for the present


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Related to for the present: in the wrong, pay a visit

pres·ent 1

 (prĕz′ənt)
n.
1. A moment or period in time perceptible as intermediate between past and future; now.
2. Grammar
a. The present tense.
b. A verb form in the present tense.
3. presents Law The document or instrument in question: Be it known by these presents.
adj.
1. Existing or happening now; current: the present leader; present trends.
2.
a. Being at hand or in attendance: Thirty guests were present at the ceremony.
b. Existing in something specified: Oxygen is present in the bloodstream.
3. Now being considered; actually here or involved: the present subject; present company excepted.
4. Grammar Designating a verb tense or form that expresses current time.
5. Archaic Readily available; immediate.
6. Obsolete Alert to circumstances; attentive.
Idioms:
at present
At the present time; right now.
for the present
For the time being; temporarily.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin praesēns, praesent-, present participle of praeesse, to be present : prae-, pre- + esse, to be; see es- in Indo-European roots.]

pres′ent·ness n.

pre·sent 2

 (prĭ-zĕnt′)
v. pre·sent·ed, pre·sent·ing, pre·sents
v.tr.
1.
a. To make a gift or award of: presented the medal to the winner.
b. To make a gift to: presented the winner with a medal.
2.
a. To offer for observation, examination, or consideration; show or display: The detective presented his badge.
b. To offer (a play, for example) for public entertainment.
c. To afford or furnish: The situation presented us with a chance to improve our knowledge.
d. To turn or position in the direction of another: presented his face to the camera.
e. Immunology To display (an antigen) on the cell surface. Used especially of cells such as macrophages and dendritic cells, where the displayed antigen activates T cells as part of an immune response.
3. To represent or depict in a certain manner: The movie presents bankers as greedy and coldhearted.
4.
a. To introduce, especially with formal ceremony.
b. To introduce (a young woman) to society with conventional ceremony.
5. To hold, carry, or point (a weapon) in a particular manner as a salutation or sign of honor, usually along the center axis of the body.
6. Ecclesiastical To recommend (a cleric) for a benefice.
v.intr.
1. To make a presentation.
2. Medicine
a. To be evident or manifest. Used of a disease or condition: how Lyme disease presents in its later stages.
b. To exhibit symptoms or signs during a medical examination: The patient presented with headache and heel pain.
n.
1. pres·ent (prĕz′ənt) Something presented; a gift.
2. pre·sent (prĭ-zĕnt′) The position of a rifle or other weapon when presented.

[Middle English presenten, from Old French presenter, from Latin presentāre, to show, from praesēns, praesent-, present participle of praeesse, to be in front of; see present1.]

pre·sent′er n.
Translations
في هذا الوَقْت، الآن
pro tuto chvíli
for nu
sem stendur, í bili
şimdilik

present1

(ˈpreznt) adjective
1. being here, or at the place, occasion etc mentioned. My father was present on that occasion; Who else was present at the wedding?; Now that the whole class is present, we can begin the lesson.
2. existing now. the present moment; the present prime minister.
3. (of the tense of a verb) indicating action now. In the sentence `She wants a chocolate', the verb is in the present tense.
ˈpresently adverb
1. soon. He will be here presently.
2. (especially American) at the present time. The manager is presently on holiday.
the present
the time now. Forget the past – think more of the present and the future!
at present
at the present time. He's away from home at present.
for the present
as far as the present time is concerned. You've done enough work for the present.
References in classic literature ?
I shall have much to say about images in a later lecture; for the present I am merely concerned with them in so far as they are "copies" of past sensations.
The now temperate regions of the United States would likewise be covered by arctic plants and animals, and these would be nearly the same with those of Europe; for the present circumpolar inhabitants, which we suppose to have everywhere travelled southward, are remarkably uniform round the world.
Once or twice indeed, since James's engagement had taught her what could be done, she had got so far as to indulge in a secret "perhaps," but in general the felicity of being with him for the present bounded her views: the present was now comprised in another three weeks, and her happiness being certain for that period, the rest of her life was at such a distance as to excite but little interest.