forbear


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for·bear 1

 (fôr-bâr′)
v. for·bore (-bôr′), for·borne (-bôrn′), for·bear·ing, for·bears
v.intr.
1. To keep oneself from doing something; hold back; refrain: forbear from making a comment.
2. To be tolerant or patient in the face of provocation.
v.tr.
1. To refrain from; resist: forbore criticizing them.
2. To restrain oneself so as not (to do something): "He saw that she was preoccupied, and forbore to question her" (Thomas Hardy).

[Middle English forberen, from Old English forberan, to endure; see bher- in Indo-European roots.]

for·bear′er n.

for·bear 2

 (fôr′bâr′)
n.
Variant of forebear.

forbear

(fɔːˈbɛə)
vb, -bears, -bearing, -bore or -borne
1. (when: intr, often foll by from or an infinitive) to cease or refrain (from doing something)
2. archaic to tolerate or endure (misbehaviour, mistakes, etc)
[Old English forberan; related to Gothic frabairan to endure]
forˈbearer n
forˈbearingly adv

forbear

(ˈfɔːˌbɛə)
n
a variant spelling of forebear

for•bear1

(fɔrˈbɛər)

v. -bore, -borne, -bear•ing. v.t.
1. to refrain or abstain from; desist from.
2. Obs. to avoid; shun.
3. Obs. to endure.
v.i.
4. to refrain; hold back.
5. to be patient or self-controlled when subject to annoyance or provocation.
[before 900]
for•bear′er, n.

for•bear2

(ˈfɔrˌbɛər)

n.

forbear


Past participle: forborne
Gerund: forbearing

Imperative
forbear
forbear
Present
I forbear
you forbear
he/she/it forbears
we forbear
you forbear
they forbear
Preterite
I forbore
you forbore
he/she/it forbore
we forbore
you forbore
they forbore
Present Continuous
I am forbearing
you are forbearing
he/she/it is forbearing
we are forbearing
you are forbearing
they are forbearing
Present Perfect
I have forborne
you have forborne
he/she/it has forborne
we have forborne
you have forborne
they have forborne
Past Continuous
I was forbearing
you were forbearing
he/she/it was forbearing
we were forbearing
you were forbearing
they were forbearing
Past Perfect
I had forborne
you had forborne
he/she/it had forborne
we had forborne
you had forborne
they had forborne
Future
I will forbear
you will forbear
he/she/it will forbear
we will forbear
you will forbear
they will forbear
Future Perfect
I will have forborne
you will have forborne
he/she/it will have forborne
we will have forborne
you will have forborne
they will have forborne
Future Continuous
I will be forbearing
you will be forbearing
he/she/it will be forbearing
we will be forbearing
you will be forbearing
they will be forbearing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been forbearing
you have been forbearing
he/she/it has been forbearing
we have been forbearing
you have been forbearing
they have been forbearing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been forbearing
you will have been forbearing
he/she/it will have been forbearing
we will have been forbearing
you will have been forbearing
they will have been forbearing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been forbearing
you had been forbearing
he/she/it had been forbearing
we had been forbearing
you had been forbearing
they had been forbearing
Conditional
I would forbear
you would forbear
he/she/it would forbear
we would forbear
you would forbear
they would forbear
Past Conditional
I would have forborne
you would have forborne
he/she/it would have forborne
we would have forborne
you would have forborne
they would have forborne
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.forbear - a person from whom you are descended
ancestor, antecedent, ascendant, ascendent, root - someone from whom you are descended (but usually more remote than a grandparent)
grandparent - a parent of your father or mother
great grandparent - a parent of your grandparent
Verb1.forbear - refrain from doing; "she forbore a snicker"
refrain, forbear - resist doing something; "He refrained from hitting him back"; "she could not forbear weeping"
2.forbear - resist doing something; "He refrained from hitting him back"; "she could not forbear weeping"
leave alone, leave behind, leave - leave unchanged or undisturbed or refrain from taking; "leave it as is"; "leave the young fawn alone"; "leave the flowers that you see in the park behind"
let it go - not act; "He thought of a reply but let it go"
abstain - refrain from voting
spare, save - refrain from harming
forbear, hold back - refrain from doing; "she forbore a snicker"
help oneself, help - abstain from doing; always used with a negative; "I can't help myself--I have to smoke"; "She could not help watching the sad spectacle"
stand by - not act or do anything; "He just stood by when the police beat up the demonstrators"
sit out - not participate in (an activity, such as a dance or a sports event); "He sat out the game"

forbear

verb refrain, avoid, omit, hold back, stop, decline, pause, cease, withhold, abstain, eschew, keep from, resist the temptation to, desist, restrain yourself I forbore to comment on this.

forbear

verb
To hold oneself back:
Translations

forbear

[fɔːˈbɛəʳ] (forbore (pt) (forborne (pp))) VIcontenerse
to forbear to do sthabstenerse de hacer algo

forbear

[fɔːrˈbɛər] vi
to forbear to do sth → s'abstenir de faire qch
to forbear from sth → s'abstenir de qch

forbear

1 pret <forbore>, ptp <forborne> (form)
vi I forbore from expressing my opinionich verzichtete darauf or nahm Abstand davon, meine Meinung zu äußern; we begged him to forbearwir baten ihn, darauf zu verzichten
vt he forbore to make any commenter enthielt sich jeden Kommentars

forbear

2
n (form)Vorfahr(in) m(f), → Ahn(e) m, → Ahne f

forbear

[fɔːˈbɛəʳ] (forbore (pt) (forborne (pp))) vi to forbear from doing, to forbear to doastenersi dal fare
References in classic literature ?
But I forbear to dwell any longer on a matter which has hitherto worn too loose a garb to admit even of an accurate inspection of its real shape or tendency.
It has been very properly observed by different speakers and writers on the side of the Constitution, that if the exercise of the power of internal taxation by the Union should be discovered on experiment to be really inconvenient, the federal government may then forbear the use of it, and have recourse to requisitions in its stead.
Some forbear it, not upon negligence alone, but doubting to bring themselves into melancholy, in respect they shall find it broken.
Miss Bridget did not, however, suffer her to continue long in this doubtful situation; for having looked some time earnestly at the child, as it lay asleep in the lap of Mrs Deborah, the good lady could not forbear giving it a hearty kiss, at the same time declaring herself wonderfully pleased with its beauty and innocence.
He mentioned it in a very artful manner at council, where I was told that some of the wisest appeared, at least by their silence, to be of my opinion; but others, who were my secret enemies, could not forbear some expressions which, by a side-wind, reflected on me.
But I was a little comforted by a message from his majesty, "that he would give orders to the grand justiciary for passing my pardon in form:" which, however, I could not obtain; and I was privately assured, "that the empress, conceiving the greatest abhorrence of what I had done, removed to the most distant side of the court, firmly resolved that those buildings should never be repaired for her use: and, in the presence of her chief confidents could not forbear vowing revenge.
At last Robin could no longer forbear, and his good right arm swung round like a flash.
But 'tis the second time I have had special tickets to a show from beneath the bushes, and I cannot forbear my delight.
It is not easy to forbear reflecting with how little reason these men profess themselves the followers of Jesus, who left this great characteristic to His disciples, that they should be known by loving one another, by universal and unbounded charity and benevolence.
signifying renewal as well as change for I have sworn before you and Almighty God the same solemn oath our forbears prescribed nearly a century and three-quarters ago.
And yet the same revolutionary beliefs for which our forbears fought are still at issue around the globe.
Among his forbears had been wild moss-troopers and cattle-reivers, lairds of their own lands, as powerful as kings in their own countryside.