forbearance

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Related to forbearances: deferment

for·bear·ance

 (fôr-bâr′əns)
n.
1. Tolerance and restraint in the face of provocation; patience.
2. Law The act of giving a debtor more time to pay rather than immediately enforcing a debt that is due.

forbearance

(fɔːˈbɛərəns)
n
1. the act of forbearing
2. self-control; patience
3. (Law) law abstention from or postponement of the enforcement of a legal right, esp by a creditor allowing his debtor time to pay

for•bear•ance

(fɔrˈbɛər əns)

n.
1. the act of forbearing; a refraining from taking action.
2. forbearing conduct or quality; patient endurance; self-control.
3. an abstaining from the enforcement of a right, esp. a creditor's granting of more time to repay a debt.
[1570–80]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.forbearance - good-natured tolerance of delay or incompetenceforbearance - good-natured tolerance of delay or incompetence
good nature - a cheerful, obliging disposition
2.forbearance - a delay in enforcing rights or claims or privileges; refraining from acting; "his forbearance to reply was alarming"
delay, holdup - the act of delaying; inactivity resulting in something being put off until a later time

forbearance

forbearance

noun
1. The capacity of enduring hardship or inconvenience without complaint:
2. Forbearing or lenient treatment:
Translations
صَبْر، طول أناة، إحْتِمال
trpělivost
langmodighedtålmodighed
umburîarlyndi
atturībaiecietība

forbearance

[fɔːˈbɛərəns] Npaciencia f

forbearance

[fɔːrˈbɛərəns] npatience f

forbearance

nNachsicht f

forbearance

[fɔːˈbɛərns] npazienza, tolleranza

forˈbearance

(fəˈbeərəns) noun
patience; control of temper. She showed great forbearance.
forˈbearing adjective
patient. a patient and forbearing friend.
References in classic literature ?
The particular policy of the national and of the State systems of finance might now and then not exactly coincide, and might require reciprocal forbearances.
It is only your due that I should now thank you for treating me with great forbearance at a time when forbearance was mercy.
If you are generous, here is a fitting opportunity for the exercise of your magnanimity: if you are proud, here am I - your rival - ready to acknowledge myself your debtor for an act of the most noble forbearance.
You must suppress your gratitude, and endeavour to forget my forbearance in the matter of the bracelet.
Indeed, a state which is well composed of two others ought to resemble them both, and neither, Such a state ought to have its means of preservation in itself, and not without; and when I say in itself, I do not mean that it should owe this to the forbearance of their neighbours, for this may happen to a bad government, but to every member of the community's not being willing that there should be the least alteration in their constitution.
I have already recognized you as a lady in embarrassed circumstances, who has peculiar claims on my consideration and forbearance.
Perhaps she might have passed over more had his manners been flattering to Isabella's sister, but they were only those of a calmly kind brother and friend, without praise and without blindness; but hardly any degree of personal compliment could have made her regardless of that greatest fault of all in her eyes which he sometimes fell into, the want of respectful forbearance towards her father.
That it is true his other virtues would not have been sufficient for him may be proved by the case of Scipio, that most excellent man, not only of his own times but within the memory of man, against whom, nevertheless, his army rebelled in Spain; this arose from nothing but his too great forbearance, which gave his soldiers more license than is consistent with military discipline.
He believed he had taxed the forbearance of the powers above to the extremity of endurance and that this was the result.
I was calm for some time; but the greatest degree of forbearance may be overcome, and I hope I was afterwards sufficiently keen.
Jones no sooner heard this than he quitted the master, laying on him at the same time the most violent injunctions of forbearance from any further insult on the Merry-Andrew; and then taking the poor wretch with him into his own apartment, he soon learned tidings of his Sophia, whom the fellow, as he was attending his master with his drum the day before, had seen pass by.
The forbearance of her family on a point, respecting which she could be in no doubt of their wishes, might be their surest means of forwarding it.