force


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force

 (fôrs)
n.
1. The capacity to do work or cause physical change; energy, strength, or active power: the force of an explosion.
2.
a. Power made operative against resistance; exertion: use force in driving a nail.
b. The use of physical power or violence to compel or restrain: a confession obtained by force.
3.
a. Intellectual power or vigor, especially as conveyed in writing or speech.
b. Moral strength.
c. A capacity for affecting the mind or behavior; efficacy: the force of logical argumentation.
d. One that possesses such capacity: the forces of evil.
4.
a. A body of persons or other resources organized or available for a certain purpose: a large labor force.
b. A person or group capable of influential action: a retired senator who is still a force in national politics.
5.
a. Military strength.
b. A unit of a nation's military personnel, especially one deployed into combat: Our armed forces have at last engaged the enemy.
6. Physics
a. A vector quantity that tends to produce an acceleration of a body in the direction of its application. Newton's second law of motion states that a free body accelerates in the direction of the applied force and that its acceleration is directly proportional to the force and inversely proportional to its mass.
7. Baseball A force play.
tr.v. forced, forc·ing, forc·es
1. To compel through pressure or necessity: I forced myself to practice daily. He was forced to take a second job.
2.
a. To gain by the use of force or coercion: force a confession.
b. To move or effect against resistance or inertia: forced my foot into the shoe.
c. To inflict or impose relentlessly: He forced his ideas upon the group.
3.
a. To put undue strain on: She forced her voice despite being hoarse.
b. To increase or accelerate (a pace, for example) to the maximum.
c. To produce with effort and against one's will: force a laugh in spite of pain.
d. To use (language) with obvious lack of ease and naturalness.
4.
a. To move, open, or clear by force: forced our way through the crowd.
b. To break down or open by force: force a lock.
5. To rape.
6. To induce change in (a complex system) by changing one of its parameters: greenhouse gases that force the earth's climate.
7. Botany To cause to grow or mature by artificially accelerating normal processes.
8. Baseball
a. To put (a runner) out on a force play.
b. To allow (a run) to be scored by walking a batter when the bases are loaded.
9. Games To cause an opponent to play (a particular card).
Idioms:
force (oneself) on/upon
To rape.
force (someone's) hand
To force to act or speak prematurely or unwillingly.
in force
1. In full strength; in large numbers: Demonstrators were out in force.
2. In effect; operative: a rule that is no longer in force.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Medieval Latin fortia, from neuter pl. of Latin fortis, strong; see bhergh- in Indo-European roots.]

force′a·ble adj.
forc′er n.
Synonyms: force, compel, coerce, oblige, obligate
These verbs mean to cause one to follow a prescribed or dictated course against one's will. Force, the most general, usually implies the exertion of physical power or the operation of circumstances that permit no options: The driver was forced from his car at gunpoint. A downturn in the market forced us to sell. Compel has a similar range but applies especially to the exertion of legal or moral authority: The official was compelled to testify under the committee's subpoena power. I felt compelled by my conscience to return the money. Coerce implies the application of pressure or threats in securing compliance: "The technology exists to reduce or eliminate these emissions, but industry will not apply it unless coerced" (Andrew Weil).
Oblige implies the operation of authority, necessity, or moral or ethical considerations: "Work consists of whatever a body is obliged to do" (Mark Twain).
Obligate applies when compliance is enforced by a legal contract or by the dictates of one's conscience or sense of propriety: I am obligated to repay the loan. See Also Synonyms at strength.

force

(fɔːs)
n
1. strength or energy; might; power: the force of the blow; a gale of great force.
2. exertion or the use of exertion against a person or thing that resists; coercion
3. (General Physics) physics
a. a dynamic influence that changes a body from a state of rest to one of motion or changes its rate of motion. The magnitude of the force is equal to the product of the mass of the body and its acceleration
b. a static influence that produces an elastic strain in a body or system or bears weight. Symbol: F
4. (General Physics) physics any operating influence that produces or tends to produce a change in a physical quantity: electromotive force; coercive force.
5.
a. intellectual, social, political, or moral influence or strength: the force of his argument; the forces of evil.
b. a person or thing with such influence: he was a force in the land.
6. vehemence or intensity: he spoke with great force.
7. (Military) a group of persons organized for military or police functions: armed forces.
8. the force (sometimes capital) informal the police force
9. a group of persons organized for particular duties or tasks: a workforce.
10. (Law) criminal law violence unlawfully committed or threatened
11. (Philosophy) philosophy logic that which an expression is normally used to achieve. See speech act, illocution, perlocution
12. (Law) (of a law) having legal validity or binding effect
13. in great strength or numbers
14. join forces to combine strengths, efforts, etc
vb (tr)
15. to compel or cause (a person, group, etc) to do something through effort, superior strength, etc; coerce
16. to acquire, secure, or produce through effort, superior strength, etc: to force a confession.
17. to propel or drive despite resistance: to force a nail into wood.
18. to break down or open (a lock, safe, door, etc)
19. to impose or inflict: he forced his views on them.
20. (Agriculture) to cause (plants or farm animals) to grow or fatten artificially at an increased rate
21. to strain or exert to the utmost: to force the voice.
22. to rape; ravish
23. (Card Games) cards
a. to compel (a player) to trump in order to take a trick
b. to compel a player by the lead of a particular suit to play (a certain card)
c. (in bridge) to induce (a bid) from one's partner by bidding in a certain way
24. force a smile to make oneself smile
25. force down to compel an aircraft to land
26. force the pace to adopt a high speed or rate of procedure
[C13: from Old French, from Vulgar Latin fortia (unattested), from Latin fortis strong]
ˈforceable adj
ˈforceless adj
ˈforcer n
ˈforcingly adv

force

(fɔːs)
n
(in northern England) a waterfall
[C17: from Old Norse fors]

force

(fɔrs, foʊrs)

n., v. forced, forc•ing. n.
1. physical power or strength: to pull with all one's force.
2. strength exerted upon an object; physical coercion; violence: to use force to open a door.
3. strength; energy; power: the force of the waves; a personality of great force.
4. power to influence, affect, or control; efficacious power: the force of circumstances.
5. Law. unlawful violence threatened or committed against persons or property.
6. persuasive power; power to convince: the force of an argument.
7. mental or moral strength: force of character.
8. might, as of a ruler or realm; strength for war.
9. Often, forces. the military or fighting strength, esp. of a nation.
10. any body of persons combined for joint action: a sales force.
11. intensity or strength of effect: the force of her acting.
12. Physics.
a. an influence on a body or system, producing or tending to produce a change in movement or shape or other effects.
b. the intensity of such an influence. Symbol: F, f
13. any influence or agency analogous to physical force: social forces.
14. binding power, as of a contract.
16. value; significance; meaning.
v.t.
17. to compel, constrain, or oblige (oneself or someone) to do something: to force a suspect to confess.
18. to drive or propel against resistance.
19. to bring about or effect by force.
20. to bring about of necessity or as a necessary result: to force a smile.
21. to put or impose (something or someone) forcibly on or upon a person: to force one's opinions on others.
22. to obtain or draw forth by or as if by force; extort: to force a confession.
23. to enter or take by force; overpower: They forced the town after a long siege.
24. to break open (a door, lock, etc.).
25. to cause (plants, fruits, etc.) to grow or mature at an increased rate by artificial means.
26. to press or urge (an animal, person, etc.) to violent effort or to the utmost.
27. to use force upon.
28. to rape.
29. Baseball.
a. to cause (a base runner) to be put out in a force play.
b. to cause (a base runner or run) to score, as by walking a batter with the bases full (often fol. by in).
30. (in cards)
a. to compel (a player) to trump by leading a suit of which the player has no cards.
b. to compel a player to play (a particular card).
c. to compel (a player) to play so as to make known the strength of the hand.
v.i.
31. to make one's way by force.
Idioms:
in force,
a. in operation; effective: a rule no longer in force.
b. in large numbers; at full strength: to attack in force.
[1250–1300; Middle English < Middle French < Vulgar Latin *fortia, derivative of Latin fortis strong]
force′a•ble, adj.
force′less, adj.
forc′er, n.

force

(fôrs)
1. Something that causes a body to move, changes its speed or direction, or distorts its shape. One force may be counteracted by another, so that there is no change or distortion.
2. Any of the four natural phenomena exerting an influence between particles of matter. From the strongest to the weakest, these four forces are the strong nuclear force, the electromagnetic force, the weak nuclear force, and gravity.
Did You Know? The verb force might make you think of pushing really hard on a stuck door or of banging the bottom of a stubborn ketchup bottle. The scientific meaning of the noun force also involves getting an object to move. In the mid-1600s, the great English physicist Isaac Newton figured out that the amount of force needed to move an object was directly related to both the mass of the object and how it is accelerated. (Pushing a pebble clearly takes less force than pushing a boulder, and pushing a boulder quickly obviously takes more force than pushing it slowly.) What is now known as Newton's second law of motion sets down this relationship quantitatively: Force equals mass times acceleration, or F = ma. You see this equation in action every time you step on a scale. Your weight is actually the downward force that results from your body mass being pulled—accelerated—by gravity. Remember that acceleration here means a change in direction or in speed, either faster or slower. A boat that bumps a dock comes momentarily to a standstill. That rapid decrease in speed multiplied by the mass of the boat is the force with which the boat hits the dock.

force

1. An aggregation of military personnel, weapon systems, equipment, and necessary support, or combination thereof.
2. A major subdivision of a fleet.

Force

 a body of men prepared for action, 1375; a body of police; policemen collectively, 1851. See also army, host, troop.

force


Past participle: forced
Gerund: forcing

Imperative
force
force
Present
I force
you force
he/she/it forces
we force
you force
they force
Preterite
I forced
you forced
he/she/it forced
we forced
you forced
they forced
Present Continuous
I am forcing
you are forcing
he/she/it is forcing
we are forcing
you are forcing
they are forcing
Present Perfect
I have forced
you have forced
he/she/it has forced
we have forced
you have forced
they have forced
Past Continuous
I was forcing
you were forcing
he/she/it was forcing
we were forcing
you were forcing
they were forcing
Past Perfect
I had forced
you had forced
he/she/it had forced
we had forced
you had forced
they had forced
Future
I will force
you will force
he/she/it will force
we will force
you will force
they will force
Future Perfect
I will have forced
you will have forced
he/she/it will have forced
we will have forced
you will have forced
they will have forced
Future Continuous
I will be forcing
you will be forcing
he/she/it will be forcing
we will be forcing
you will be forcing
they will be forcing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been forcing
you have been forcing
he/she/it has been forcing
we have been forcing
you have been forcing
they have been forcing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been forcing
you will have been forcing
he/she/it will have been forcing
we will have been forcing
you will have been forcing
they will have been forcing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been forcing
you had been forcing
he/she/it had been forcing
we had been forcing
you had been forcing
they had been forcing
Conditional
I would force
you would force
he/she/it would force
we would force
you would force
they would force
Past Conditional
I would have forced
you would have forced
he/she/it would have forced
we would have forced
you would have forced
they would have forced

force

1. Something applied which alters a body’s state of rest or motion.
2. A technique of inducing a plant to flower, fruit, or grow out of season by controlling the environment.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.force - a powerful effect or influence; "the force of his eloquence easily persuaded them"
influence - a power to affect persons or events especially power based on prestige etc; "used her parents' influence to get the job"
pressure - a force that compels; "the public brought pressure to bear on the government"
duress - compulsory force or threat; "confessed under duress"
heartbeat - an animating or vital unifying force; "New York is the commercial heartbeat of America"
lifeblood - an essential or life-giving force; "water is the lifeblood of India"
wheel - forces that provide energy and direction; "the wheels of government began to turn"
2.force - (physics) the influence that produces a change in a physical quantity; "force equals mass times acceleration"
natural philosophy, physics - the science of matter and energy and their interactions; "his favorite subject was physics"
physical phenomenon - a natural phenomenon involving the physical properties of matter and energy
aerodynamic force - forces acting on airfoils in motion relative to the air (or other gaseous fluids)
chemical attraction, affinity - the force attracting atoms to each other and binding them together in a molecule; "basic dyes have an affinity for wool and silk"
attraction, attractive force - the force by which one object attracts another
repulsion, repulsive force - the force by which bodies repel one another
centrifugal force - the outward force on a body moving in a curved path around another body
centripetal force - the inward force on a body moving in a curved path around another body
cohesion - (physics) the intermolecular force that holds together the molecules in a solid or liquid
Coriolis force - (physics) a force due to the earth's rotation; acts on a body in motion (airplane or projectile) in a rotating reference frame; in a rotating frame of reference Newton's second law of motion can be made to apply if in addition to the real forces acting on a body a Coriolis force and a centrifugal force are introduced
drift, impetus, impulsion - a force that moves something along
Lorentz force - the force experienced by a point charge moving along a wire that is in a magnetic field; the force is at right angles to both the current and the magnetic field; "the Lorentz force can be used to suspend a current-carrying object between two magnets"
moment - a turning force produced by an object acting at a distance (or a measure of that force)
propulsion - a propelling force
pull - the force used in pulling; "the pull of the moon"; "the pull of the current"
thrust, push - the force used in pushing; "the push of the water on the walls of the tank"; "the thrust of the jet engines"
reaction - (mechanics) the equal and opposite force that is produced when any force is applied to a body; "every action has an equal and opposite reaction"
stress - (physics) force that produces strain on a physical body; "the intensity of stress is expressed in units of force divided by units of area"
torque, torsion - a twisting force
magnetomotive force - the force that produces magnetic flux
elan vital, life force, vital force, vitality - (biology) a hypothetical force (not physical or chemical) once thought by Henri Bergson to cause the evolution and development of organisms
3.force - physical energy or intensity; "he hit with all the force he could muster"; "it was destroyed by the strength of the gale"; "a government has not the vitality and forcefulness of a living man"
brunt - main force of a blow etc; "bore the brunt of the attack"
momentum, impulse - an impelling force or strength; "the car's momentum carried it off the road"
vigor, vigour, energy, zip - forceful exertion; "he plays tennis with great energy"; "he's full of zip"
intensiveness, intensity - high level or degree; the property of being intense
4.force - group of people willing to obey ordersforce - group of people willing to obey orders; "a public force is necessary to give security to the rights of citizens"
organization, organisation - a group of people who work together
guerilla force, guerrilla force - an irregular armed force that fights by sabotage and harassment; often rural and organized in large groups
armed service, military service, service - a force that is a branch of the armed forces
armed forces, armed services, military, military machine, war machine - the military forces of a nation; "their military is the largest in the region"; "the military machine is the same one we faced in 1991 but now it is weaker"
paramilitary, paramilitary force, paramilitary organisation, paramilitary organization, paramilitary unit - a group of civilians organized in a military fashion (especially to operate in place of or to assist regular army troops)
constabulary, police, police force, law - the force of policemen and officers; "the law came looking for him"
private security force, security force - a privately employed group hired to protect the security of a business or industry
military police, MP - a military corps that enforces discipline and guards prisoners
manpower, men, work force, workforce, hands - the force of workers available
patrol - a group that goes through a region at regular intervals for the purpose of security
military personnel, soldiery, troops - soldiers collectively
rank and file, rank - the ordinary members of an organization (such as the enlisted soldiers of an army); "the strike was supported by the union rank and file"; "he rose from the ranks to become a colonel"
staff - personnel who assist their superior in carrying out an assigned task; "the hospital has an excellent nursing staff"; "the general relied on his staff to make routine decisions"
line personnel - personnel having direct job performance responsibilities
management personnel - personnel having overall planning and direction responsibilities
5.force - a unit that is part of some military serviceforce - a unit that is part of some military service; "he sent Caesar a force of six thousand men"
trip wire - a small military force that serves as a first line of defense; if they become engaged in hostilities it will trigger the intervention of stronger military forces
social unit, unit - an organization regarded as part of a larger social group; "the coach said the offensive unit did a good job"; "after the battle the soldier had trouble rejoining his unit"
command - a military unit or region under the control of a single officer
enemy - an opposing military force; "the enemy attacked at dawn"
task force - a temporary military unit formed to accomplish a particular objective
army unit - a military unit that is part of an army
naval unit - a military unit that is part of a navy
air unit - a military unit that is part of the airforce
armour, armor - a military unit consisting of armored fighting vehicles
armed service, military service, service - a force that is a branch of the armed forces
armed forces, armed services, military, military machine, war machine - the military forces of a nation; "their military is the largest in the region"; "the military machine is the same one we faced in 1991 but now it is weaker"
mujahadeen, mujahadein, mujahadin, mujahedeen, mujahedin, mujahideen, mujahidin - a military force of Muslim guerilla warriors engaged in a jihad; "some call the mujahidin international warriors but others just call them terrorists"
guard - a military unit serving to protect some place or person
legion - a large military unit; "the French Foreign Legion"
echelon - a body of troops arranged in a line
phalanx - a body of troops in close array
Republican Guard - formerly Iraq's elite military unit whose primary role was to protect the government in Baghdad
Haganah - the clandestine military wing of the Jewish leadership during the British rule over the mandate of Palestine from 1920 to 1948; became the basis for the Israeli defense force
IDF, Israeli Defense Force - the ground and air and naval forces of Israel
militia, reserves - civilians trained as soldiers but not part of the regular army
commando - an amphibious military unit trained for raids into enemy territory
contingent, detail - a temporary military unit; "the peacekeeping force includes one British contingent"
headquarters - (plural) a military unit consisting of a commander and the headquarters staff
spearhead - the leading military unit in an attack
military man, serviceman, man, military personnel - someone who serves in the armed forces; a member of a military force; "two men stood sentry duty"
6.force - an act of aggression (as one against a person who resists)force - an act of aggression (as one against a person who resists); "he may accomplish by craft in the long run what he cannot do by force and violence in the short one"
aggression, hostility - violent action that is hostile and usually unprovoked
domestic violence - violence or physical abuse directed toward your spouse or domestic partner; usually violence by men against women
road rage - violence exhibited by drivers in traffic
public violence, riot - a public act of violence by an unruly mob
7.force - one possessing or exercising power or influence or authority; "the mysterious presence of an evil power"; "may the force be with you"; "the forces of evil"
causal agency, causal agent, cause - any entity that produces an effect or is responsible for events or results
juggernaut, steamroller - a massive inexorable force that seems to crush everything in its way
influence - one having power to influence another; "she was the most important influence in my life"; "he was a bad influence on the children"
Moloch - a tyrannical power to be propitiated by human subservience or sacrifice; "the great Moloch of war"; "duty has become the Moloch of modern life"- Norman Douglas
8.force - a group of people having the power of effective action; "he joined forces with a band of adventurers"
social group - people sharing some social relation
9.force - (of a law) having legal validity; "the law is still in effect"
validness, validity - the quality of having legal force or effectiveness
law, jurisprudence - the collection of rules imposed by authority; "civilization presupposes respect for the law"; "the great problem for jurisprudence to allow freedom while enforcing order"
10.force - a putout of a base runner who is required to run; the putout is accomplished by holding the ball while touching the base to which the runner must advance before the runner reaches that base; "the shortstop got the runner at second on a force"
putout - an out resulting from a fielding play (not a strikeout); "the first baseman made 15 putouts"
baseball, baseball game - a ball game played with a bat and ball between two teams of nine players; teams take turns at bat trying to score runs; "he played baseball in high school"; "there was a baseball game on every empty lot"; "there was a desire for National League ball in the area"; "play ball!"
Verb1.force - to cause to do through pressure or necessity, by physical, moral or intellectual means :"She forced him to take a job in the city"; "He squeezed her for information"
turn up the heat, turn up the pressure - apply great or increased pressure; "The Democrats turned up the heat on their candidate to concede the election"
drive - to compel or force or urge relentlessly or exert coercive pressure on, or motivate strongly; "She is driven by her passion"
bludgeon - overcome or coerce as if by using a heavy club; "The teacher bludgeoned the students into learning the math formulas"
steamroll, steamroller - bring to a specified state by overwhelming force or pressure; "The Senator steamrollered the bill to defeat"
squeeze for - squeeze someone for money, information, etc.
dragoon, railroad, sandbag - compel by coercion, threats, or crude means; "They sandbagged him to make dinner for everyone"
terrorise, terrorize - coerce by violence or with threats
compel, obligate, oblige - force somebody to do something; "We compel all students to fill out this form"
bring oneself - cause to undertake a certain action, usually used in the negative; "He could not bring himself to call his parents"
2.force - urge or force (a person) to an action; constrain or motivate
cause, do, make - give rise to; cause to happen or occur, not always intentionally; "cause a commotion"; "make a stir"; "cause an accident"
3.force - move with force, "He pushed the table into a corner"
nudge, poke at, prod - to push against gently; "She nudged my elbow when she saw her friend enter the restaurant"
push, press - make strenuous pushing movements during birth to expel the baby; "`Now push hard,' said the doctor to the woman"
force back, push back, repel, beat back, repulse, drive - cause to move back by force or influence; "repel the enemy"; "push back the urge to smoke"; "beat back the invaders"
shove - push roughly; "the people pushed and shoved to get in line"
flick, jerk - throw or toss with a quick motion; "flick a piece of paper across the table"; "jerk his head"
move, displace - cause to move or shift into a new position or place, both in a concrete and in an abstract sense; "Move those boxes into the corner, please"; "I'm moving my money to another bank"; "The director moved more responsibilities onto his new assistant"
shove, jostle - come into rough contact with while moving; "The passengers jostled each other in the overcrowded train"
push - press against forcefully without moving; "she pushed against the wall with all her strength"
nose - push or move with the nose
obtrude, push out, thrust out - push to thrust outward
push aside, push away - push out of the way
muscle into - force one's way; "He muscled into the union"
push up - push upward
thrust - push forcefully; "He thrust his chin forward"
drive - urge forward; "drive the cows into the barn"
jam - push down forcibly; "The driver jammed the brake pedal to the floor"
stuff, thrust, shove, squeeze - press or force; "Stuff money into an envelope"; "She thrust the letter into his hand"
topple, tumble, tip - cause to topple or tumble by pushing
crowd out, force out - press, force, or thrust out of a small space; "The weeds crowded out the flowers"
drive out, rouse, rout out, force out - force or drive out; "The police routed them out of bed at 2 A.M."
4.force - impose urgently, importunately, or inexorably; "She forced her diet fads on him"
sting, stick - saddle with something disagreeable or disadvantageous; "They stuck me with the dinner bill"; "I was stung with a huge tax bill"
compel, obligate, oblige - force somebody to do something; "We compel all students to fill out this form"
5.force - squeeze like a wedge into a tight spaceforce - squeeze like a wedge into a tight space; "I squeezed myself into the corner"
impact - press or wedge together; pack together
compress, pack together, compact - make more compact by or as if by pressing; "compress the data"
move, displace - cause to move or shift into a new position or place, both in a concrete and in an abstract sense; "Move those boxes into the corner, please"; "I'm moving my money to another bank"; "The director moved more responsibilities onto his new assistant"
6.force - force into or from an action or state, either physically or metaphorically; "She rammed her mind into focus"; "He drives me mad"
toenail, toe - drive obliquely; "toe a nail"
drive - compel somebody to do something, often against his own will or judgment; "She finally drove him to change jobs"
thrust - push forcefully; "He thrust his chin forward"
drive - to compel or force or urge relentlessly or exert coercive pressure on, or motivate strongly; "She is driven by her passion"
7.force - cause to move by pulling; "draw a wagon"; "pull a sled"
twitch - move or pull with a sudden motion
pull back - move to a rearward position; pull towards the back; "Pull back your arms!"
adduct - draw a limb towards the body; "adduct the thigh muscle"
abduct - pull away from the body; "this muscle abducts"
stretch - pull in opposite directions; "During the Inquisition, the torturers would stretch their victims on a rack"
pluck, plunk, pick - pull lightly but sharply with a plucking motion; "he plucked the strings of his mandolin"
tug - pull or strain hard at; "Each oar was tugged by several men"
drag - pull, as against a resistance; "He dragged the big suitcase behind him"; "These worries were dragging at him"
cart, haul, drag, hale - draw slowly or heavily; "haul stones"; "haul nets"
attract, pull in, draw in, pull, draw - direct toward itself or oneself by means of some psychological power or physical attributes; "Her good looks attract the stares of many men"; "The ad pulled in many potential customers"; "This pianist pulls huge crowds"; "The store owner was happy that the ad drew in many new customers"
jerk, yank - pull, or move with a sudden movement; "He turned the handle and jerked the door open"
winch - pull or lift up with or as if with a winch; "winch up the slack line"
pluck, pull off, tweak, pick off - pull or pull out sharply; "pluck the flowers off the bush"
pull - apply force so as to cause motion towards the source of the motion; "Pull the rope"; "Pull the handle towards you"; "pull the string gently"; "pull the trigger of the gun"; "pull your knees towards your chin"
move, displace - cause to move or shift into a new position or place, both in a concrete and in an abstract sense; "Move those boxes into the corner, please"; "I'm moving my money to another bank"; "The director moved more responsibilities onto his new assistant"
pull, draw - cause to move in a certain direction by exerting a force upon, either physically or in an abstract sense; "A declining dollar pulled down the export figures for the last quarter"
8.force - do forcibly; exert force; "Don't force it!"
pull - apply force so as to cause motion towards the source of the motion; "Pull the rope"; "Pull the handle towards you"; "pull the string gently"; "pull the trigger of the gun"; "pull your knees towards your chin"
act, move - perform an action, or work out or perform (an action); "think before you act"; "We must move quickly"; "The governor should act on the new energy bill"; "The nanny acted quickly by grabbing the toddler and covering him with a wet towel"
gouge, force out - force with the thumb; "gouge out his eyes"
squirt, eject, force out, squeeze out - cause to come out in a squirt; "the boy squirted water at his little sister"
evict, force out - expel from one's property or force to move out by a legal process; "The landlord evicted the tenants after they had not paid the rent for four months"
force back, push back, repel, beat back, repulse, drive - cause to move back by force or influence; "repel the enemy"; "push back the urge to smoke"; "beat back the invaders"
9.force - take by force; "Storm the fort"
penetrate, perforate - pass into or through, often by overcoming resistance; "The bullet penetrated her chest"

force

verb
2. impose, foist To force this agreement on the nation is wrong.
3. push, thrust, propel They forced her head under the icy waters, drowning her.
4. break open, blast, wrench, prise, open, wrest, use violence on The police forced the door of the flat and arrested him.
5. extort, drag, exact, wring using torture to force a confession out of a suspect
extort convince, persuade, prevail, induce, coax, talk into
noun
1. compulsion, pressure, violence, enforcement, constraint, oppression, coercion, duress, arm-twisting (informal) calls for the siege to be ended by force
3. agency, means, power, medium, influence, vehicle, instrument, mechanism, instrumentality, operation The army was the most powerful political force.
4. influence, power, effect, authority, weight, strength, punch (informal), significance, effectiveness, validity, efficacy, soundness, persuasiveness, cogency, bite He changed our world through the force of his ideas.
5. intensity, vigour, vehemence, fierceness, drive, emphasis, persistence She took a step back from the force of his rage.
6. army, unit, division, corps, company, body, host, troop, squad, patrol, regiment, battalion, legion, squadron, detachment a pan-European peace-keeping force
in force
7. valid, working, current, effective, binding, operative, operational, in operation, on the statute book The new tax is already in force.
8. in great numbers, all together, in full strength Voters turned out in force.
Quotations
"Force without reason falls of its own weight" [Horace Odes]
"There is no real force without justice" [Napoleon Maxims]
"Where force is necessary, there it must be applied boldly, decisively and completely. But one must know the limitations of force; one must know when to blend force with a manoeuvre, a blow with an agreement" [Leon Trotsky What Next?]
"Force is as pitiless to the man who possesses it, or thinks he does, as it is to its victims; the second it crushes, the first it intoxicates. The truth is, nobody really possesses it" [Simone Weil The Iliad or the Poem of Force]

force

noun
1. Capacity or power for work or vigorous activity:
2. Power used to overcome resistance:
3. Effective means of influencing, compelling, or punishing:
Informal: clout, muscle.
4. The strong effect exerted by one person or thing on another:
5. The capacity to exert an influence:
6. A group of people organized for a particular purpose:
verb
1. To cause (a person or thing) to act or move in spite of resistance:
2. To compel by pressure or threats:
Informal: hijack, strong-arm.
3. To compel (another) to participate in or submit to a sexual act:
Translations
قُوّاتقُوَّةقُوَّهيُجْبِريُجْبِرُ
nutitsílasílyvynutitletectvo
tvingekraftstyrkekraftenmagt
pakottaavoimaväkivaltavalta
כח
prisilitisila
erõszakolkarhatalomkatonai erõkierõszakolkikényszerít
afl, krafturmannafli, liîsafliná/gera meî erfiîismunumòvinga, neyîa
強いる
강요하다
cogo
forsuotasgalingasjėgakaro pajėgospajėgos
bruņotie spēkiizspiestkaraspēkspiespiestspēki
forţă
prinútiť sasila
silasilitivlomitimoč
styrkatvingakraft
กำลังบังคับ
cưỡng éplực

force

[fɔːs]
A. N
1. (= strength) → fuerza f
the building took the full force of the blastel edificio recibió toda la fuerza or todo el impacto de la explosión
to do sth by forcehacer algo por la fuerza
they removed him from the bar by forcelo sacaron del bar a la fuerza or por la fuerza
by force of armspor la fuerza de las armas
by force of circumstance(s)debido a las circunstancias
by sheer force (physical) → sólo a base de fuerza
by (sheer) force of numberspor pura superioridad numérica
she tried to convert people by force of argumentintentaba convencer a la gente a fuerza de or a base de argumentos
by or through sheer force of personalitya fuerza de or a base de puro carácter
from force of habitpor la fuerza de la costumbre
the force of gravityla fuerza de la gravedad
the police were out in forcela policía había salido en masa, había un enorme despliegue policial
to resort to forcerecurrir a la fuerza
to use forcehacer uso de la fuerza
see also brute B
2. (Met) a force five windun viento de fuerza cinco
3. (= influence) → fuerza f
the social and economic forces that influence our decisionslas fuerzas sociales y económicas que influyen en nuestras decisiones
he is a powerful force in the trade union movementes una persona con mucho peso dentro del movimiento sindicalista
the forces of evillas fuerzas del mal
the forces of naturelas fuerzas de la naturaleza
Janet is obviously a force to be reckoned withJanet es sin lugar a dudas una persona a (la que hay que) tener en cuenta
see also driving, join, life, market
4. (= legitimacy) → fuerza f
the guidelines do not have the force of lawlas directrices no tienen fuerza de ley
to be in force [law, tax] → estar vigente or en vigor
a curfew is in forcese ha impuesto un toque de queda
to come into forceentrar en vigor, hacerse vigente
5. (= body of people) (Mil) → fuerza f
allied forcesfuerzas fpl aliadas, ejércitos mpl aliados
sales force (Comm) → personal m de ventas
the force (= police force) → la policía, el cuerpo (de policía)
the forces (Brit) (Mil) → las fuerzas armadas
B. VT
1. (= compel) [+ person] → obligar, forzar
she was forced to the conclusion thatse vio obligada or forzada a concluir que ...
to force sb to do sthobligar or forzar a algn a hacer algo
I am forced to admit thatme veo obligado or forzado a admitir que ...
I had to force myself to pick it uptuve que obligarme or forzarme a recogerlo del suelo
I had to force myself to stay calmtuve que obligarme or forzarme a permanecer sereno
to force sb into doing sthobligar or forzar a algn a hacer algo
they forced me into signing the agreementme obligaron or forzaron a firmar el acuerdo
to force sb into a corner (fig) → arrinconar a algn
to force sb's hand (intentionally) → apretar las tuercas or las clavijas a algn; (by circumstances) → no dejar a algn más remedio que actuar
2. (= impose)
to force sth on sbimponer algo a algn
he forced his views on themles impuso su punto de vista
the decision was forced on himla decisión le fue or le vino impuesta
to force o.s. on sb: I don't want to force myself on you, butno quisiera importunarte (con mi presencia), pero ...
he forced himself on one of the girls (sexually) → forzó a una de las chicas
3. (= push, squeeze)
he forced the clothes into the suitcasemetió la ropa en la maleta a la fuerzaembutió la ropa en la maleta
they forced their way into the flatse metieron en el piso a or por la fuerza
the lorry forced the car off the roadel camión obligó or forzó al coche a salirse de la carreterael camión hizo que el coche se saliera de la carretera
he was forced out of officelo obligaron or forzaron a dimitir del cargo
she forced her way through the crowdse abrió paso entre la muchedumbre a or por la fuerza
to force a bill through Parliamenthacer que se apruebe un proyecto de ley en el Parlamento
4. (= break open) [+ lock, door] → forzar
to force sth open [+ drawer, door, window] → forzar algo
5. (= exert, strain) [+ voice] → forzar
to force the pace (lit) → forzar el ritmo or la marcha (fig) → forzar la marcha de los acontecimientos
don't force the situationno fuerces la situación
6. (= produce with effort) [+ answer] → forzar
to force a smileforzar una sonrisa, sonreír de manera forzada
7. (Hort, Agr) [+ vegetable, fruit] → acelerar el crecimiento de
8. (= obtain by force) → conseguir a or por la fuerza
to force a confession from or out of sbobtener una confesión de algn a or por la fuerza
we forced the secret out of himle sacamos el secreto a or por la fuerza
to force a vote on sthforzar una votación sobre algo
C. CPD force majeure Nfuerza f mayor
force back VT + ADV
1. [+ crowd, enemy] → obligar a retroceder, hacer retroceder (a la fuerza)
2. [+ laughter, tears] → contener
she forced back her desire to laughcontuvo las ganas de reírse
to force back one's tearscontener las lágrimas
force down VT + ADV
1. [+ food] → tragarse a la fuerza
can you force a bit more down? (hum) → ¿te cabe un poco más?
2. [+ aeroplane] → obligar a aterrizar
3. [+ prices] → hacer bajar, hacer que bajen
force out VT + ADV
1. [+ person] (from office) → obligar a dejar el cargo
2. [+ words] → conseguir pronunciar
he forced out an apologycon un esfuerzo enorme, pidió perdón
force up VT + ADV [+ prices] → hacer subir, hacer que suban

force

[ˈfɔːrs]
n
(= strength) (physical)force f
the force of the explosion → la force de l'explosion
(= influential factor) → force f
outside forces (= external factors) → forces extérieures
Society is apparently directed by outside forces → La société est apparemment contrôlée par des forces extérieures.
from force of habit, through force of habit → par la force de l'habitude
by force of circumstance → par la force des choses
(= power) → force f
to have the force of law → avoir force de loi
the forces of evil → les forces du mal
(natural)force f
forces of nature → forces fpl de la nature
(METEOROLOGY)force f
a force 5 wind → un vent de force 5
(= coercion) → force f
by force → par la force
by force of arms (= by military power) → à la force des armes
(= military contingent) → force f
a volunteer force → une troupe de volontaires
in force (= in large numbers) → en force
to turn up in force → arriver en force
the sales force (= team) → la force de vente
to be in force (= in operation) [law, system] → être en vigueur
No-smoking rules are now in force → Un règlement qui interdit de fumer est maintenant en vigueur.
to come into force → entrer en vigueur
to join forces (= work together) → unir ses forces
to join forces with sb → unir ses forces avec qn Forces
npl
the Forces (British)l'armée f
vt
(= compel) → forcer
to force sb to do sth → forcer qn à faire qch
They forced him to open the safe → Ils l'ont forcé à ouvrir le coffre-fort.
to force o.s. to do sth → se forcer à faire qch
to force sth on sb → imposer qch à qn
(= push roughly) → forcer
to force one's way somewhere
He was trying to force his way into the building → Il essayait de forcer l'entrée du bâtiment.
to force one's way through the crowd → se frayer un chemin à travers la foule
[+ lock, door, window] → forcer
to force a smile → se forcer à sourire
force back
vt
[+ crowd, enemy] → repousser
[+ tears] → refouler
force down
vt [+ food] → se forcer à manger
force off
vt (= force to leave) to force a farmer off his land → expulser un fermier de ses terres
to be forced off [player] → devoir quitter le terrain
force out
vt
(= expel) → faire sortir par la force
to be forced out of sth [+ position] → contraindre à quitter qch
(= extract) to force a confession out of sb → arracher des aveux à qn

force

n
no pl (= physical strength, power)Kraft f; (of blow, impact, collision)Wucht f; (= physical coercion)Gewalt f; (Phys) → Kraft f; to resort to forceGewalt anwenden; to settle something by forceetw gewaltsam or durch Gewalt beilegen; by sheer forcedurch reine Gewalt; by or through sheer force of numbersaufgrund or auf Grund zahlenmäßiger Überlegenheit; there is a force 5 wind blowinges herrscht Windstärke 5; the force of the wind was so great he could hardly standder Wind war so stark, dass er kaum stehen konnte; they were there in forcesie waren in großer Zahl da; they came in forcesie kamen in großer Zahl or Stärke
no pl (fig) (of argument)Überzeugungskraft f; (of music, phrase)Eindringlichkeit f; (of character)Stärke f; (of words)Macht f; that was force of habitdas war die Macht der Gewohnheit; by or from force of habitaus Gewohnheit; by force of willdurch Willensanstrengung or Willenskraft; the force of circumstancesder Druck der Verhältnisse; I see the force of what he is sayingich sehe ein, was er sagt, ist zwingend
(= powerful thing, person)Macht f; Forces of NatureNaturgewalten pl; there are various forces at work herehier sind verschiedene Kräfte am Werk; he is a powerful force in the reform movementer ist ein einflussreicher Mann in der Reformbewegung ? life force
(= body of men) the forces (Mil) → die Streitkräfte pl; the (police) forcedie Polizei; to join forcessich zusammentun ? sales force, workforce
to come into/be in forcein Kraft treten/sein
vt
(= compel)zwingen; to force somebody/oneself to do somethingjdn/sich zwingen, etw zu tun; he was forced to resigner wurde gezwungen zurückzutreten; (= felt obliged to)er sah sich gezwungen zurückzutreten; he was forced to conclude that …er sah sich zu der Folgerung gezwungen or gedrängt, dass …
(= extort, obtain by force)erzwingen; he forced a confession out of or from meer erzwang ein Geständnis von mir; to force an error (Sport) → einen Fehler erzwingen, den Gegner ausspielen
to force something (up)on somebody (present, one’s company)jdm etw aufdrängen; conditions, obediencejdm etw auferlegen; conditions, decision, warjdm etw aufzwingen; he forced himself on her (sexually) → er tat ihr Gewalt an
(= break open)aufbrechen; to force (an) entrysich (dat)gewaltsam Zugang or Zutritt verschaffen
(= push, squeeze) to force books into a boxBücher in eine Kiste zwängen; the liquid is forced up the tube by a pumpdie Flüssigkeit wird von einer Pumpe durch das Rohr nach oben gepresst; if it won’t open/go in, don’t force itwenn es nicht aufgeht/passt, wende keine Gewalt an; to force one’s way into somethingsich (dat)gewaltsam Zugang zu etw or in etw (acc)verschaffen; to force one’s way throughsich (dat)gewaltsam einen Weg bahnen; to force a car off the roadein Auto von der Fahrbahn drängen; to force a bill through parliamenteine Gesetzesvorlage durch das Parlament peitschen
plantstreiben
(= produce with effort) to force a smilegezwungen lächeln; to force the pacedas Tempo forcieren; don’t force iterzwingen Sie es nicht

force

[fɔːs]
1. n
a. (gen) → forza
to resort to force → ricorrere alla violenza
force of gravity → forza di gravità
a force 5 wind → un vento forza 5
the forces of evil (fig) → le forze del male
by force → con la forza
by force of habit → per abitudine
by sheer force of character, he ... → grazie alla sua forza di carattere, lui...
to be in force (Law) → essere in vigore
to come into force (Law) → entrare in vigore
to turn out in force → manifestare in gran numero or in massa
b. (body of men) → gruppo (Mil) → forza
the force (police force) → la polizia, il corpo di polizia
the sales force (Comm) → l'effettivo dei rappresentanti
c. the Forces (Brit) (Mil) → le forze armate
2. vt
a. (compel, person) → forzare, costringere
to force sb to do sth → costringere qn a fare qc
b. (impose) to force sth on sbimporre qc a qn
to force o.s. on sb → imporsi a qn, imporre la propria presenza a qn
c. (push, squeeze) → schiacciare
he forced the clothes into the suitcase → ha fatto entrare a forza i vestiti nella valigia
to force one's way into → entrare con la forza in
to force one's way through (crowd) → farsi strada tra (opening) → penetrare a forza in, passare a forza attraverso
d. (break open, lock) → forzare
to force an entry → entrare con la forza
to force sb's hand (fig) → forzare la mano a qn
e. (produce with effort) to force a smile/a replysforzarsi di sorridere/rispondere
don't force the situation → non forzare le cose
f. (obtain by force, smile, confession) → strappare
force back vt + adv (crowd, enemy) → respingere; (urge) → reprimere; (tears) → ingoiare
force down vt + adv (food) → sforzarsi di mangiare; (aircraft) → forzare ad atterrare
force out vt + adv (person) → costringere ad uscire; (cork) → far uscire con la forza

force

(foːs) noun
1. strength or power that can be felt. the force of the wind.
2. a person or thing that has great power. the forces of Nature.
3. (sometimes with capital) a group of men prepared for action. the police force; the Royal Air Force.
verb
1. to make (someone or something) do something, go somewhere etc, often against his etc will. He forced me to give him money.
2. to achieve by strength or effort. He forced a smile despite his grief.
forced adjective
done with great effort. a forced march.
ˈforceful adjective
powerful. a forceful argument.
ˈforcefully adverb
ˈforces noun plural
the army, navy and air force considered together. The Forces played a large part in the parade.
in/into force
in or into operation; working or effective. The new law is now in force.

force

قُوَّة, يُجْبِرُ nutit, síla styrke, tvinge Kraft, zwingen εξαναγκάζω, ισχύς fuerza, obligar pakottaa, voima force, forcer prisiliti, sila forza, forzare, 強いる 강요하다, 힘 dwingen, macht styrke, tvinge siła, zmusić força, forçar принуждать, сила styrka, tvinga กำลัง, บังคับ güç, zorlamak cưỡng ép, lực 力量, 强制

force

n. fuerza, vigor, energía;
v.
to ___ outechar a la fuerza;
to ___ throughhacer penetrar a la fuerza;
v. forzar, violentar, obligar.

force

n fuerza
References in classic literature ?
I know better than that), and the next asserts that `Though it is original, and written with great force and feeling, it is a dangerous book.
He was one of those men in whom the force that creates life is diffused, not centralized.
Damon, in his enthusiasm, banged his fist down on the table with such force that he knocked some books to the floor.
The veteran Scotchman just named held the first, with a regiment of regulars and a few provincials; a force really by far too small to make head against the formidable power that Montcalm was leading to the foot of his earthen mounds.
Young Andrews sprang to his feet, and, with the force of a hose flushing a gutter, swept his soiled visitors into the hall.
The hostile disposition of the savages, and their allies, caused General Clark, the commandant at the Falls of the Ohio, immediately to begin an expedition with his own regiment, and the armed force of the country, against Pecaway, the principal town of the Shawanese, on a branch of Great Miami, which he finished with great success, took seventeen scalps, and burnt the town to ashes, with the loss of seventeen men.
You force me to tell you something I should like to forget.
His son lacked not merely the father's eminent position, but the talent and force of character to achieve it: he could, therefore, effect nothing by dint of political interest; and the bare justice or legality of the claim was not so apparent, after the Colonel's decease, as it had been pronounced in his lifetime.
Lucie with her arms stretched out to him, and with that old look of earnestness so concentrated and intensified, that it seemed as though it had been stamped upon her face expressly to give force and power to it in this one passage of her life.
how chang'd From him, who in the happy Realms of Light Cloth'd with transcendent brightnes didst outshine Myriads though bright: If he whom mutual league, United thoughts and counsels, equal hope, And hazard in the Glorious Enterprize, Joynd with me once, now misery hath joynd In equal ruin: into what Pit thou seest From what highth fal'n, so much the stronger provd He with his Thunder: and till then who knew The force of those dire Arms?
Animated with these succours, he marched out of his trenches to enter those of the Portuguese, who received him with the utmost bravery, destroyed prodigious numbers of his men, and made many sallies with great vigour, but losing every day some of their small troops, and most of their officers being killed, it was easy to surround and force them.
That is a chain of galley slaves, on the way to the galleys by force of the king's orders.