forces


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Related to forces: Fundamental forces

force

 (fôrs)
n.
1. The capacity to do work or cause physical change; energy, strength, or active power: the force of an explosion.
2.
a. Power made operative against resistance; exertion: use force in driving a nail.
b. The use of physical power or violence to compel or restrain: a confession obtained by force.
3.
a. Intellectual power or vigor, especially as conveyed in writing or speech.
b. Moral strength.
c. A capacity for affecting the mind or behavior; efficacy: the force of logical argumentation.
d. One that possesses such capacity: the forces of evil.
4.
a. A body of persons or other resources organized or available for a certain purpose: a large labor force.
b. A person or group capable of influential action: a retired senator who is still a force in national politics.
5.
a. Military strength.
b. A unit of a nation's military personnel, especially one deployed into combat: Our armed forces have at last engaged the enemy.
6. Physics
a. A vector quantity that tends to produce an acceleration of a body in the direction of its application. Newton's second law of motion states that a free body accelerates in the direction of the applied force and that its acceleration is directly proportional to the force and inversely proportional to its mass.
7. Baseball A force play.
tr.v. forced, forc·ing, forc·es
1. To compel through pressure or necessity: I forced myself to practice daily. He was forced to take a second job.
2.
a. To gain by the use of force or coercion: force a confession.
b. To move or effect against resistance or inertia: forced my foot into the shoe.
c. To inflict or impose relentlessly: He forced his ideas upon the group.
3.
a. To put undue strain on: She forced her voice despite being hoarse.
b. To increase or accelerate (a pace, for example) to the maximum.
c. To produce with effort and against one's will: force a laugh in spite of pain.
d. To use (language) with obvious lack of ease and naturalness.
4.
a. To move, open, or clear by force: forced our way through the crowd.
b. To break down or open by force: force a lock.
5. To rape.
6. To induce change in (a complex system) by changing one of its parameters: greenhouse gases that force the earth's climate.
7. Botany To cause to grow or mature by artificially accelerating normal processes.
8. Baseball
a. To put (a runner) out on a force play.
b. To allow (a run) to be scored by walking a batter when the bases are loaded.
9. Games To cause an opponent to play (a particular card).
Idioms:
force (oneself) on/upon
To rape.
force (someone's) hand
To force to act or speak prematurely or unwillingly.
in force
1. In full strength; in large numbers: Demonstrators were out in force.
2. In effect; operative: a rule that is no longer in force.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Medieval Latin fortia, from neuter pl. of Latin fortis, strong; see bhergh- in Indo-European roots.]

force′a·ble adj.
forc′er n.
Synonyms: force, compel, coerce, oblige, obligate
These verbs mean to cause one to follow a prescribed or dictated course against one's will. Force, the most general, usually implies the exertion of physical power or the operation of circumstances that permit no options: The driver was forced from his car at gunpoint. A downturn in the market forced us to sell. Compel has a similar range but applies especially to the exertion of legal or moral authority: The official was compelled to testify under the committee's subpoena power. I felt compelled by my conscience to return the money. Coerce implies the application of pressure or threats in securing compliance: "The technology exists to reduce or eliminate these emissions, but industry will not apply it unless coerced" (Andrew Weil).
Oblige implies the operation of authority, necessity, or moral or ethical considerations: "Work consists of whatever a body is obliged to do" (Mark Twain).
Obligate applies when compliance is enforced by a legal contract or by the dictates of one's conscience or sense of propriety: I am obligated to repay the loan. See Also Synonyms at strength.

Forces

(ˈfɔːsɪz)
pl n
(Military) the Forces the armed services of a nation
Translations
قُوّات، جُنود، جَيْش
síly
væbnede styrker
herafli
ozbrojené sily
silâhlı kuvvetler

force

(foːs) noun
1. strength or power that can be felt. the force of the wind.
2. a person or thing that has great power. the forces of Nature.
3. (sometimes with capital) a group of men prepared for action. the police force; the Royal Air Force.
verb
1. to make (someone or something) do something, go somewhere etc, often against his etc will. He forced me to give him money.
2. to achieve by strength or effort. He forced a smile despite his grief.
forced adjective
done with great effort. a forced march.
ˈforceful adjective
powerful. a forceful argument.
ˈforcefully adverb
ˈforces noun plural
the army, navy and air force considered together. The Forces played a large part in the parade.
in/into force
in or into operation; working or effective. The new law is now in force.
References in classic literature ?
His walking in the fields and through the forests at night had brought him close to nature and there were forces in the passionately religious man that ran out to the forces in nature.
Maybe you're thinking of joining forces with the professor again, as you did when you dug the big tunnel.
He observed his hostess attentively from under his shaggy brows, and noted a subtle change which had transformed her from the listless woman he had known into a being who, for the moment, seemed palpitant with the forces of life.
You forget that I have told you our guide is now a Mohawk, and that he serves with our forces as a friend.
Whether this answer affected their courage, or not, I cannot tell; but, contrary to our expectations, they formed a scheme to deceive us, declaring it was their orders, from Governor Hamilton, to take us captives, and not to destroy us; but if nine of us would come out, and treat with them, they would immediatly withdraw their forces from our walls, and return home peaceably.
In that grand order of battle in which Captain Ahab would probably marshal his forces to descend on the whales, these three headsmen were as captains of companies.
That I do not despair is because I know also the forces that are driving behind you--because I know the raging lash of poverty, the sting of contempt and mastership, 'the insolence of office and the spurns.
Legree, like some potentates we read of in history, governed his plantation by a sort of resolution of forces.
He took one look and then flew to rouse out his forces.
Such is the way in which the Germans seem to define the word "rest"; that is to say, they rest a member by recreating, recuperating, restore its forces.
But at last the battle was done, and the forces re- tired with weaker and weaker threatenings and grum- blings, and peace resumed her sway.
But other forces had been at work in Rebecca, and the traits of unknown forbears had been wrought into her fibre.