fore-edge


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fore-edge

n
(Printing, Lithography & Bookbinding) the outer edge of the pages of a book
References in periodicals archive ?
To assist with the quick location of family groups throughout the book, the fore-edge of the book is colour coded.
The above-mentioned plate is an etching, taken from Johann Comenius's Orbis sensualium pictus (London, 1685), which shows in great detail the quasi-geometrical layout of a seventeenth-century bookshop, with books being kept in horizontal stacks of unbound sheets, for readers to bind themselves in their preferred configuration, and with only about a third of the stock kept in ready-bound form, sitting vertically on the shelf, fore-edge out.
Taking place at the Fort Mason Center in the beautiful Marina district, over 40 international participants present a range of trompe l'oeil and transformable exhibits, including metamorphic furniture and fore-edge painting.
Particularly intriguing are fore-edge paintings, scenes or figures painted on the fore-edge of a book but visible only when the pages of the book are slightly bent or fanned so as to reveal the illustration.
However, she describes with clarity the various methods, both luxurious and economical, for constructing a decorated binding for a large book: the methods of sewing signatures, of gluing, constructing bands and false bands, spines, tailpieces, fore-edge paintings, book presses--all the marvelous paraphernalia of the craft.
The boards and cording-pattern of this volume were pronounced by Graham Pollard to be Anglo-Saxoa ~Some Anglo-Saxoa bookbiadings', The Book Collector, xxiv (1975), 130-59, at 143-4, diagram 3, with argumeats about the biading's origins relying heavily, though not exclusively, on the ~Dunstan' reading); but it would be rash to make the same claim for the leather and sewing-structure, for the repairs of Nicholsoa's time were so radical that the manuscript now has raised cords and a rounded back which make the boards project unnaturally at the fore-edge.