foreign armed force

foreign armed force

An armed force belonging to a government or organizational entity other than the United States.
References in periodicals archive ?
194) The Act also creates a number of related crimes, such as recruiting persons to serve in such a foreign military (195) or leaving Canada to join such a foreign armed force.
Times have changed, he said, noting that joining a foreign armed force nowadays is "no longer forbidden.
AROUND 140 Rwandan soldiers have arrived in Sudan's troubled Darfur region, the first foreign armed force deployed there since Arab militiamen began attacking black African farmers.
Besides the national army and numerous militia of different ideologies and external backers, Syria also has five foreign armed forces on its territory - from Iran, Russia, Israel, the US and now Turkey.
It will be the Palestinian people and not foreign armed forces who will soon turn the tables in favor of Palestine.
At its regular government meeting, which will be held this Tuesday, ministers will consider amendments to the law confirming the passage and residence of allied and foreign armed forces on the territory of the Republic of Bulgaria, reports sega.
For persons who will have joined foreign armed forces before Jan.
The New York based Permanent Libyan Ambassador to the United Nations, Ibrahim Omar Dabbashi, is cleverly saying that Libya will not be inviting anytime soon foreign armed forces to help but now wants General Khalifa Haftar's Libya National Army to receive arms with the immediate lifting of the UN arms embargo on Libya.
owever, in our opinion, there is still an element that needs to be adjusted: the same people's perception on the status of foreign armed forces on the Romanian territory.
Tokyo - Seeking more assertive diplomatic and national security role internationally, Japan's Cabinet on Tuesday adopted new guidelines for international aid that for the first time clearly state that it will allow provisions for foreign armed forces, although limited to non-military purposes.
TOKYO, Feb 10 (KUNA) -- The Japanese government on Tuesday adopted a new foreign aid charter that will allow the country to offer economic assistance to foreign armed forces for the first time since Japan first began providing an official development aid in 1955.

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