foresail


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fore·sail

 (fôr′səl, -sāl′)
n. Nautical
1. The lowest and usually largest sail set on the foremast of a sailing vessel.
2. The triangular sail hung to the forestay of a cutter or sloop.

foresail

(ˈfɔːˌseɪl; nautical ˈfɔːsəl)
n
1. (Nautical Terms) the aftermost headsail of a fore-and-aft rigged vessel
2. (Nautical Terms) the lowest sail set on the foremast of a square-rigged vessel

fore•sail

(ˈfɔrˌseɪl, ˈfoʊr-; Naut. -səl)

n.
1. the lowermost sail on a foremast.
2. the staysail or jib, set immediately forward of the mainmast of a sloop, cutter, yawl, or ketch.
[1475–85]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.foresail - the lowest sail on the foremast of a square-rigged vesselforesail - the lowest sail on the foremast of a square-rigged vessel
sail, canvass, canvas, sheet - a large piece of fabric (usually canvas fabric) by means of which wind is used to propel a sailing vessel
Translations

foresail

[ˈfɔːseɪl] Ntrinquete m

foresail

n (Naut) → Focksegel nt

foresail

[ˈfɔːˌseɪl] n (Naut) → (vela di) trinchetto
References in classic literature ?
Foresail rises and discovers the watch standing, lounging, leaning, and lying in various attitudes, all singing in chorus.
Her two masts leaned a trifle backward; she carried brigantine, foresail, storm-jib, and standing-jib, and was well rigged for running before the wind; and she seemed capable of brisk speed, which, indeed, she had already proved by gaining several prizes in pilot-boat races.
Indeed, it is less than nothing, and I have seen, when the great soul of the world turned over with a heavy sigh, a perfectly new, extra-stout foresail vanish like a bit of some airy stuff much lighter than gossamer.
It happened while we were setting a reefed foresail, at dusk.
As to the seas, they runs more in uppers in the Bay of Biscay, unless it may be in a sow-wester, when they tumble about quite handsomely; thof it’s not in the narrow sea that you are to look for a swell; just go off the Western Islands, in a westerly blow, keeping the land on your larboard hand, with the ship’s head to the south’ard, and bring to, under a close-reefed topsail; or, mayhap, a reefed foresail, with a fore-topmast-staysail and mizzen staysail to keep her up to the sea, if she will bear it; and ay there for the matter of two watches, if you want to see mountains.
An' see that big one with a patch in her foresail an' a new jib?
The Jessie swung off under her full staysail, then the foresail, double-reefed, was run up.
The sun was shining brightly, but something more than a half-gale was shrieking up the Carquinez Straits, and the Mary Rebecca got under way with two reefs in her mainsail and one in her foresail.
Coming home from church this morning, the wind blew me about, and Will called out, right in the street, 'Brail up the foresail, and take in the flying-jib, that will ease her.
As I understood it, there were two ways of getting it cleared,-- first, by lowering the foresail, which was comparatively easy and without danger; and second, by climbing out the peak-halyards to the end of the gaff itself, an exceedingly hazardous performance.
She was on the starboard tack, and on the left hand, under the arched foot of the foresail, I could see the sunset still quite bright.
rigging and fitting my masts and sails; for I finished them very complete, making a small stay, and a sail, or foresail, to it, to assist if we should turn to windward; and, what was more than all, I fixed a rudder to the stern of her to steer with.