foresail

(redirected from foresails)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

fore·sail

 (fôr′səl, -sāl′)
n. Nautical
1. The lowest and usually largest sail set on the foremast of a sailing vessel.
2. The triangular sail hung to the forestay of a cutter or sloop.

foresail

(ˈfɔːˌseɪl; nautical ˈfɔːsəl)
n
1. (Nautical Terms) the aftermost headsail of a fore-and-aft rigged vessel
2. (Nautical Terms) the lowest sail set on the foremast of a square-rigged vessel

fore•sail

(ˈfɔrˌseɪl, ˈfoʊr-; Naut. -səl)

n.
1. the lowermost sail on a foremast.
2. the staysail or jib, set immediately forward of the mainmast of a sloop, cutter, yawl, or ketch.
[1475–85]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.foresail - the lowest sail on the foremast of a square-rigged vesselforesail - the lowest sail on the foremast of a square-rigged vessel
sail, canvass, canvas, sheet - a large piece of fabric (usually canvas fabric) by means of which wind is used to propel a sailing vessel
Translations

foresail

[ˈfɔːseɪl] Ntrinquete m

foresail

n (Naut) → Focksegel nt

foresail

[ˈfɔːˌseɪl] n (Naut) → (vela di) trinchetto
References in classic literature ?
Foresail rises and discovers the watch standing, lounging, leaning, and lying in various attitudes, all singing in chorus.
Her two masts leaned a trifle backward; she carried brigantine, foresail, storm-jib, and standing-jib, and was well rigged for running before the wind; and she seemed capable of brisk speed, which, indeed, she had already proved by gaining several prizes in pilot-boat races.
Indeed, it is less than nothing, and I have seen, when the great soul of the world turned over with a heavy sigh, a perfectly new, extra-stout foresail vanish like a bit of some airy stuff much lighter than gossamer.
It happened while we were setting a reefed foresail, at dusk.
As to the seas, they runs more in uppers in the Bay of Biscay, unless it may be in a sow-wester, when they tumble about quite handsomely; thof it’s not in the narrow sea that you are to look for a swell; just go off the Western Islands, in a westerly blow, keeping the land on your larboard hand, with the ship’s head to the south’ard, and bring to, under a close-reefed topsail; or, mayhap, a reefed foresail, with a fore-topmast-staysail and mizzen staysail to keep her up to the sea, if she will bear it; and ay there for the matter of two watches, if you want to see mountains.
An' see that big one with a patch in her foresail an' a new jib?
The Jessie swung off under her full staysail, then the foresail, double-reefed, was run up.