forestage


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.

fore·stage

 (fôr′stāj′)
n.
The part of a stage in front of the closed curtain.

forestage

(ˈfɒrɪstɪdʒ)
n
(Historical Terms) (in ancient times) a duty paid to a king by foresters

a•pron

(ˈeɪ prən)

n.
1. a garment covering part of the front of the body and usu. tied at the back of the waist, worn to protect the clothing.
2. a metal plate or cover, as on a machine, for protecting the operator.
3. a paved area near an airfield's buildings and hangars where planes are parked.
4.
a. any device for protecting a surface of earth from the action of moving water.
b. a platform to receive the water falling over a dam.
5. the part of a stage floor in front of the curtain line.
7. the outer border of a green of a golf course.
8. the part of the floor of a boxing ring that extends outside the ropes.
9. the open part of a pier for loading and unloading vessels.
10. the frill of long hairs on the throat and chest of certain long-haired dogs, as the collie.
[1275–1325; Middle English napron (by later misdividing a napron as an apron) < Middle French naperon=nape tablecloth (< Latin mappa napkin; compare map) + -eron n. suffix]

forestage

The area of stage in front of the curtain in proscenium theaters.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.forestage - the part of a modern theater stage between the curtain and the orchestra (i.e., in front of the curtain)forestage - the part of a modern theater stage between the curtain and the orchestra (i.e., in front of the curtain)
footlights - theater light at the front of a stage that illuminate the set and actors
prompt box, prompter's box - a booth projecting above the floor in the front of a stage where the prompter sits; opens toward the performers on stage
stage - a large platform on which people can stand and can be seen by an audience; "he clambered up onto the stage and got the actors to help him into the box"
theater stage, theatre stage - a stage in a theater on which actors can perform
Translations

forestage

nVorbühne f
References in periodicals archive ?
He can do so because of "Congreve's signature playwriting technique," his preference to present "action upon the forestage with pairs of characters" (129).
From an electronic corpus of 72 plays written between 1661 and 1674, Keenan extracts a wealth of data that challenges three longstanding tenets of Restoration theatre studies: that four sets of backshutters were located upstage of the proscenium; that there were two doors on either side of the forestage; and that the forestage alone was used for performance, with actors discouraged from straying up into the scenes.
All that partner swapping has left our quartet of lovers unsure of their own reality as they finally stagger out of the obscured, warped world created by Alfonso and on to the forestage by the finale.
Before the house lies an apron, curving beyond the forestage into the orchestra.
A restored rococo fan that was previously used to push organ music toward the audience now functions as an acoustical reflector above the forestage.
The symphony forestage was programmed from mid-afternoon by Michael Sollis.
3) suggests performance conditions by depicting four overhead chandeliers and a forestage abutting the parterre; the Le Pautre screen (fig.
Between them and the proscenium there intervened a 20-foot gulf, walled with wood on the audience side, which variously accommodated a forestage, an orchestra pit, or a flight of steps.
To our surprise, we were able to effectively light the forestage and let the rest of the cottage recede into darkness.
9) The projecting edge of a platform, also called the forestage (or apron) had been shortened so as to be pushed back into the shell of the theatre and in its place was put the orchestra pit which is still to be found in more or less the same position across the world even if in different manifestations.
Looking at the beard, slowly walking forestage, touching his own face and eyes) Where are his eyes?