forester


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for·est·er

 (fôr′ĭ-stər, fŏr′-)
n.
1. One who is trained in forestry.
2. One that inhabits a forest.
3. Any of various chiefly black noctuid moths of the subfamily Agaristinae.

forester

(ˈfɒrɪstə)
n
1. (Forestry) a person skilled in forestry or in charge of a forest
2. (Animals) any of various Old World moths of the genus Ino, characterized by brilliant metallic green wings: family Zygaenidae
3. a person or animal that lives in a forest
4. (Forestry) (capital) a member of the Ancient Order of Foresters, a friendly society

Forester

(ˈfɒrɪstə)
n
(Biography) C(ecil) S(cott) 1899–1966, English novelist; creator of Captain Horatio Hornblower in a series of novels on the Napoleonic Wars

for•est•er

(ˈfɔr ə stər, ˈfɒr-)

n.
1. an expert in forestry.
2. an officer having responsibility for the maintenance of a forest.
3. an animal of the forest.
4. any moth of the family Agaristidae, typically black with two yellowish or whitish spots on each wing.
[1250–1300; Middle English < Old French]

For•est•er

(ˈfɔr ə stər, ˈfɒr-)

n.
C(ecil) S(cott), 1899–1966, English novelist.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Forester - English writer of adventure novels featuring Captain Horatio Hornblower (1899-1966)
2.forester - someone trained in forestryforester - someone trained in forestry    
farmer, granger, husbandman, sodbuster - a person who operates a farm
Translations
حِراجي، حارِس غابَه
lesník
forstmandskovfoged
metsäläinenmetsänhoitaja
erdészerdőkerülőerdőlakóerdőőr
skógræktarmaîur, skógarvörîur
ormancı

forester

[ˈfɒrɪstəʳ] N (= expert) → ingeniero/a m/f de montes; (= keeper) → guardabosques mf inv

forester

[ˈfɒrɪstər] nforestier/ière m/fforest fire nincendie m de forêtforest floor nsol m de la forêtforest ranger ngarde mf forestier/ière

forester

nFörster(in) m(f)

forester

[ˈfɒrɪstəʳ] nguardia forestale

forest

(ˈforist) noun
1. (a large piece of) land covered with trees.
2. an area of land in which animals, especially deer, are kept. a deer forest.
ˈforested adjective
covered with forest.
ˈforester noun
a person who works in a forest or is involved in forestry.
ˈforestry noun
(the science of) growing and looking after forests.
adjective
a forestry worker.
References in classic literature ?
Here for some years dwelt one Hugh Fitzooth as Head Forester, with his good wife and son Robert.
The Sheriff arrested the Forester for treason--of which, poor man, he was as guiltless as you or I--and carried him to Nottingham jail.
There was once a forester who went into the forest to hunt, and as he entered it he heard a sound of screaming as if a little child were there.
The forester climbed up, brought the child down, and thought to himself: 'You will take him home with you, and bring him up with your Lina.
Now the Sheriff of Nottingham swore that he himself would bring this knave Robin Hood to justice, and for two reasons: first, because he wanted the two hundred pounds, and next, because the forester that Robin Hood had killed was of kin to him.
As thus he walked along with a brisk step and a merry whistle, he came suddenly upon some foresters seated beneath a great oak tree.
I am,'' said the forester, ``a nameless man; but I am the friend of my country, and of my country's friends With this account of me you must for the present remain satisfied, the more especially since you yourself desire to continue unknown.
Clerk me no Clerks,'' replied the transformed priest; ``by Saint George and the Dragon, I am no longer a shaveling than while my frock is on my back When I am cased in my green cassock, I will drink, swear, and woo a lass, with any blithe forester in the West Riding.
But an I would, I could not, for that the accuser came masked by night, and told the forester, and straightway got him hence again, and so the forester knoweth him not.
It is impossible for me to say what terrific meaning was hidden in the words of this brown forester, but I know that the other passengers looked on in a sort of admiring horror, and that presently the boat was put back to the wharf, and as many of the Pioneers as could be coaxed or bullied into going away, were got rid of.
Two of the company, who were dressed in the weather-stained green doublet of foresters, lifted the big pot off the fire, and a third, with a huge pewter ladle, served out a portion of steaming collops to each guest.
Before he had, however, proceeded a hundred yards, he met the three foresters already returning from their unsuccessful pursuit.