forewing

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Related to forewings: dipterous, dipterous insect

fore·wing

 (fôr′wĭng′)
n.
Either of a pair of anterior wings of a four-winged insect.

forewing

(ˈfɔːˌwɪŋ)
n
(Zoology) either wing of the anterior pair of an insect's two pairs of wings

fore•wing

(ˈfɔrˌwɪŋ, ˈfoʊr-)

n.
either of the front smaller pair of wings of an insect having four wings.
[1885–90]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.forewing - either of the anterior pair of wings on an insect that has four wings
wing - a movable organ for flying (one of a pair)
Translations

forewing

nVorderflügel m
References in periodicals archive ?
Description: This butterfly is commonly known as akk butterfly, plain tiger or African monarch, they are generally brown in appearance with white markings at apical part of forewing, both forewings and hindwings have fringe of dark brown with small uneven spots, mid of hindwing with three spots.
Preston-Mafham 2000): when the first spermatophore is ready to transfer, the male turns his back while raising his forewings perpendicularly to the body, which exposes the glandular structures located on the metanotum below the base of the forewings.
Earwigs intricately fold and tuck their hindwings under tiny forewings, inspiring design of satellite solar panels.
The waterscorpion moved its forewings slightly (Figures 5, 6) and then suddenly, some 15 minutes after we first found it, it flew off strongly, making a whirring/buzzing noise as it did so.
Identification of the individual were based on the following: In males, they are smaller which means less weight to carry, greater strength to weight ratio for better agility, they are more brightly colored, more pointed forewings (flight aerodynamics, built for speed, chase and evasion) and they have skinner abdomens (no eggs) which is opposite to the females.
Same as the macropterous female, but with neotenic characters as follows: Forewings scale-like, with dense field of microspines throughout the surface, with no trace of venation (Fig.
The moth, which is just 5mm long, with shiny, bright brown forewings and thin, silvery white stripes is now becoming far more noticeable in Wales.
Also these three species show a reduced vein CuP in the forewings, sometimes absent or partially developed, with different states even in the wings of the same specimen.
And it has two pairs of wings, the forewings marked by a chestnut leading edge.
The forewings are black, and at the front edge there occur white stripes.
Their forewings are boldly-marked with stripes and bands similar to tigers in the jungle.