forfeiture


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for·fei·ture

 (fôr′fĭ-cho͝or′, -chər)
n.
1. The act of surrendering something as a forfeit.
2. A loss of property to penalize a failure to act in accordance with a legal requirement.

forfeiture

(ˈfɔːfɪtʃə)
n
1. something forfeited
2. the act of forfeiting or paying a penalty

for•fei•ture

(ˈfɔr fɪ tʃər)

n.
1. an act of forfeiting.
2. something that is forfeited; fine; mulct.
[1300–50; Middle English < Old French]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.forfeiture - something that is lost or surrendered as a penalty;
loss - something that is lost; "the car was a total loss"; "loss of livestock left the rancher bankrupt"
2.forfeiture - a penalty for a fault or mistake that involves losing or giving up something; "the contract specified forfeits if the work was not completed on time"
penalty - a payment required for not fulfilling a contract
3.forfeiture - the act of losing or surrendering something as a penalty for a mistake or fault or failure to perform etc.forfeiture - the act of losing or surrendering something as a penalty for a mistake or fault or failure to perform etc.
human action, human activity, act, deed - something that people do or cause to happen

forfeiture

noun loss, giving up, surrender, forfeiting, confiscation, sequestration (Law), relinquishment the forfeiture of illegally obtained profits
Translations

forfeiture

[ˈfɔːfɪtʃəʳ] Npérdida f

forfeiture

n (Jur, fig) → Verlust m, → Einbuße f; (of claim)Verwirkung f
References in classic literature ?
But, he did not conceal from me that although there might be many cases in which the forfeiture would not be exacted, there were no circumstances in this case to make it one of them.
He ask'd, but all the Heav'nly Quire stood mute, And silence was in Heav'n: on mans behalf Patron or Intercessor none appeerd, Much less that durst upon his own head draw The deadly forfeiture, and ransom set.
There are some tribes amongst them (for they are distinguished like the Jews by their tribes), among whom the crime of swearing by the name of the Virgin is punished with forfeiture of goods and even with loss of life; they are equally scrupulous of swearing by St.
The answer to this question has been anticipated in the investigation of its other characteristics, and is satisfactorily deducible from these circumstances; from the election of the President once in four years by persons immediately chosen by the people for that purpose; and from his being at all times liable to impeachment, trial, dismission from office, incapacity to serve in any other, and to forfeiture of life and estate by subsequent prosecution in the common course of law.
To declare the punishment of treason, but no attainder of treason shall work corruption of blood, or forfeiture, except during the life of the person attained.
Poor Jotham, whose life paid the forfeiture of his folly, acknowledged, before he died, that his reasons for believing in a mine were extracted from the lips of a sibyl, who, by looking in a magic glass, was enabled to discover the hidden treasures of the earth.
The Congress shall have power to declare the punishment of Treason, but no Attainder of Treason shall work Corruption of Blood, or Forfeiture except during the Life of the Person attainted.
As for mortgaging or pawning, it will little mend the matter: for either men will not take pawns without use; or if they do, they will look precisely for the forfeiture.
Into the question how far conduct, especially in the matter of alliances, constitutes a forfeiture of family claims, I do not now enter.
He often resolved, in the absence of Sophia, to leave her father's house, and to see her no more; and as often, in her presence, forgot all those resolutions, and determined to pursue her at the hazard of his life, and at the forfeiture of what was much dearer to him.
In the case that it brings tears into your affectionate eyes even to picture to yourself--in the case of your not marrying one another--no, no forfeiture on either side.
I have been told that in one of neighbour nations, whether it be in France or where else I know not, they have an order from the king, that when any criminal is condemned, either to die, or to the galleys, or to be transported, if they leave any children, as such are generally unprovided for, by the poverty or forfeiture of their parents, so they are immediately taken into the care of the Government, and put into a hospital called the House of Orphans, where they are bred up, clothed, fed, taught, and when fit to go out, are placed out to trades or to services, so as to be well able to provide for themselves by an honest, industrious behaviour.