forgivable


Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal, Idioms.

for·give

 (fər-gĭv′, fôr-)
v. for·gave (-gāv′), for·giv·en (-gĭv′ən), for·giv·ing, for·gives
v.tr.
1. To give up resentment against or stop wanting to punish (someone) for an offense or fault; pardon.
2. To relent in being angry or in wishing to exact punishment for (an offense or fault).
3. To absolve from payment of (a debt, for example).
v.intr.
To grant forgiveness.

[Middle English forgiven, from Old English forgiefan; see ghabh- in Indo-European roots.]

for·giv′a·ble adj.
for·giv′a·bly adv.
for·giv′er n.
Synonyms: forgive, pardon, excuse, condone
These verbs mean to refrain from imposing punishment on an offender or demanding satisfaction for an offense. The first three can be used as conventional ways of offering apology. More strictly, to forgive is to grant pardon without harboring resentment: "Children begin by loving their parents; as they grow older they judge them; sometimes they forgive them" (Oscar Wilde).
Pardon more strongly implies release from the liability for or penalty entailed by an offense: After the revolution all political prisoners were pardoned.
To excuse is to pass over a mistake or fault without demanding punishment or redress: "Valencia was incredibly generous to these deadbeats. She memorized their poetry and excused their bad behavior" (David Sedaris).
To condone is to overlook an offense, usually a serious one, and often suggests tacit forgiveness: Failure to protest the policy may imply a willingness to condone it.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.forgivable - easily excused or forgiven; "a venial error"
pardonable - admitting of being pardoned

forgivable

adjective pardonable, allowable, excusable, condonable, minor, slight, petty, understandable, unimportant, permissible, not serious, venial His sense of humour makes all else forgivable.

forgivable

adjective
Admitting of forgiveness or pardon:
Translations

forgivable

[fəˈgɪvəbl] ADJperdonable

forgivable

[fərˈgɪvəbəl] adjpardonnable

forgivable

adjverzeihlich, verzeihbar

forgivable

[fəˈgɪvəbl] adjperdonabile
References in classic literature ?
A very natural and forgivable mistake, Meg, but one that had better be remedied before you take to different ways, for children should draw you nearer than ever, not separate you, as if they were all yours, and John had nothing to do but support them.
As he watched the cat deliberately crouch for the spring, Cocky, gallant mote of life that he was, betrayed his one and forgivable panic.
15 Aintree SP forecast 10-11 Dual Cheltenham Festival winner, who won first three starts in novice chases, including the RSA before forgivable flop on final start at Punchestown.
A combination of a federal congestion mitigation grant and a forgivable loan through the Ohio Development Services Agency will support the improvements.
But his comments during an enforced spell on the sidelines through injury - when his world ranking dropped by a staggering 600 places - are less forgivable.
Through a series of improbable but forgivable plot gimmicks, Eric and Stosh end up living next door to Zara and Caryn.
Burton also zeroed in on Hicks' decision in 2013 to vote against the board's majority in seeking another review of the Law School Foundation's forgivable loan program.
This would be slightly less forgivable if this same man hadn't also spent the past few minutes sitting in a Glasgow cafe, blithely referring to Scotland as "England".
There are many Americans who believe that Bill Clinton was the best President they ever had, and comparing Watergate with a fling with a secretary leaves me concluding that Clinton's faux pas was far more forgivable than what Nixon was impeached for.
Clashes revolved around these conflicts, not the modern definition of purposeful genocide, and chapters thus make the case for ethnic cleansing--no less forgivable, but different.
Three key elements contribute to making new homes affordable for Calgarians with moderate incomes: forgivable equity loans, affordable home prices and a joint appreciation plan.
Diane Ridd FOR an American to think the whole country is called England is forgivable to be honest.