formalism

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for·mal·ism

 (fôr′mə-lĭz′əm)
n.
1. Rigorous or excessive adherence to recognized forms, as in religion or art.
2. An instance of rigorous or excessive adherence to recognized forms.
3. A method of aesthetic analysis that emphasizes structural elements and artistic techniques rather than content, especially in literary works.

for′mal·ist adj. & n.
for′mal·is′tic adj.
for′mal·is′ti·cal·ly adv.

formalism

(ˈfɔːməˌlɪzəm)
n
1. (Ecclesiastical Terms) scrupulous or excessive adherence to outward form at the expense of inner reality or content
2. (Logic)
a. the mathematical or logical structure of a scientific argument as distinguished from its subject matter
b. the notation, and its structure, in which information is expressed
3. (Theatre) theatre a stylized mode of production
4. (Philosophy) (in Marxist criticism) excessive concern with artistic technique at the expense of social values, etc
5. (Philosophy) the philosophical theory that a mathematical statement has no meaning but that its symbols, regarded as physical objects, exhibit a structure that has useful applications. Compare logicism, intuitionism
ˈformalist n
ˌformalˈistic adj
ˌformalˈistically adv

for•mal•ism

(ˈfɔr məˌlɪz əm)

n.
strict observance of prescribed or traditional forms, as in music, poetry, and art.
[1830–40]
for′mal•ist, n., adj.
for`mal•is′tic, adj.
for`mal•is′ti•cal•ly, adv.

formalism

a critical emphasis upon style, arrangement, and artistic means with limited attention to content, — formalist, n. — formalistic, adj.
See also: Criticism
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.formalism - the doctrine that formal structure rather than content is what should be represented
doctrine, ism, philosophical system, philosophy, school of thought - a belief (or system of beliefs) accepted as authoritative by some group or school
imitation - the doctrine that representations of nature or human behavior should be accurate imitations
2.formalism - (philosophy) the philosophical theory that formal (logical or mathematical) statements have no meaning but that its symbols (regarded as physical entities) exhibit a form that has useful applications
philosophy - the rational investigation of questions about existence and knowledge and ethics
philosophical doctrine, philosophical theory - a doctrine accepted by adherents to a philosophy
3.formalism - the practice of scrupulous adherence to prescribed or external forms
practice, pattern - a customary way of operation or behavior; "it is their practice to give annual raises"; "they changed their dietary pattern"
Translations

formalism

[ˈfɔːməlɪzəm] Nformalismo m

formalism

[ˈfɔːrməlɪzəm] nformalisme m

formalism

nFormalismus m

formalism

[ˈfɔːməˌlɪzm] nformalismo
References in periodicals archive ?
analysis is pitched so formalistically that the resulting procedural
Evaluating the limits of trust between aspiring migrants and migration brokers according to the expectations and motivations of aspiring migrants themselves allows us to see beyond formalistically understood 'rights' and 'obligations' of an economic business agreement.
This law has a good chance of passing the various preemption tests, even if they are applied formalistically.
For this reason equal protection jurisprudence that turns formalistically on facial discrimination will, from an antisubordination perspective, get it exactly backward.
It has been formalistically read as a fractal metaphor of cyclic, unprogressive narratives dominating the naturalist aesthetic (Pizer 1984, 21).
Paraguay, Sempra merely waves the question away formalistically.
How odd it is then that Ludwig Wittgenstein, a central figure in the development of analytic philosophy from roughly 1919 until his death in 1951, in his epochal 1921 Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus (English translation 1922), produced what Ben Ware aptly describes as 'a work which is modernist through and through: difficult, formalistically pure, perfectionist, heroic, resistant to any kind of instrumental appropriation' (p25) and marked by 'an aesthetic of compression and concentration' (pxii).
Unlike the failed legislation that formalistically sought to preclude subsidiaries from making expenditures based on a foreign-involvement percentage threshold, veil-piercing doctrine would preclude only the expenditures actually made by the foreign parent.
While the political investments that first mobilized Asian American poets and the more formalistically inclined Language poets might seem to occupy opposite ends of the creative spectrum, Timothy Yu makes the compelling case for reading the two traditions alongside each other: "Central to both is a surprisingly acute sense of how race can inflect aesthetics, and of the relations of power that racial differences create among contemporaneous avant-gardes" (2009, 2).
26) Strictly speaking, this means that not only the law of contract itself, but also the texts through which the law of contract is formalistically presented to society (ie, through a code, case law, legislation), need to subjugate their performative instances to tradition.
In fact, according to our programmatic presuppositions, the music's "sense" is either a-conceptual, or it coincides formalistically with music itself: there is no universal determination of a concept of a not-merely-formalistic "sense" of music--this determination being possible only in and as its artistic analogy, in and as literary or cinematographic expressions.
Japanese people tend not to like tough questions or conflicts and confrontation, so may find it in their interest to observe the spirit of the reforms early on, rather than just formalistically going through the motions.