forum


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fo·rum

 (fôr′əm)
n. pl. fo·rums also fo·ra (fôr′ə)
1.
a. The public square or marketplace of an ancient Roman city that was the assembly place for judicial activity and public business.
b. A public meeting place for open discussion.
c. A medium for open discussion or voicing of ideas, such as a newspaper, a radio or television program, or a website.
2. A public meeting or presentation involving a discussion usually among experts and often including audience participation.
3.
a. An area of legal authority; a jurisdiction.
b. A court of law or tribunal.

[Middle English, from Latin; see dhwer- in Indo-European roots.]

forum

(ˈfɔːrəm)
n, pl -rums or -ra (-rə)
1. a meeting or assembly for the open discussion of subjects of public interest
2. a medium for open discussion, such as a magazine
3. a public meeting place for open discussion
4. a court; tribunal
5. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) (in South Africa) a pressure group of leaders or representatives, esp Black leaders or representatives
6. (Historical Terms) (in ancient Italy) an open space, usually rectangular in shape, serving as a city's marketplace and centre of public business
[C15: from Latin: public place; related to Latin foris outside]

Forum

(rəʊˈmɑːnəm) or

Forum Romanum

n
(Historical Terms) the Forum the main forum of ancient Rome, situated between the Capitoline and the Palatine Hills

fo•rum

(ˈfɔr əm, ˈfoʊr əm)

n., pl. fo•rums, fo•ra (ˈfɔr ə, ˈfoʊr ə)
1. the marketplace or public square of an ancient Roman city, the center of judicial and business affairs and place of assembly.
2. a court; tribunal.
3.
a. a meeting place for discussion of matters of public interest or a means through which such discussion can be conducted, as a newspaper.
b. a public meeting or assembly for such discussion.
c. a discussion of a public issue or other serious topic by a select group, as of experts or specialists, esp. a radio or television broadcast for this purpose.
[1425–75; late Middle English < Latin: marketplace, public place]

Forum

 of Greeks—Sqfire in N. Y. Times, 1983.

forum


click for a larger image
1. In Roman architecture an open space surrounded by public buildings and colonnades. In ancient Rome the forum was the centre of civic and commercial life.
2. A Roman central open area surrounded by temples and other public buildings and suitable for public meetings. It was derived from the Greek “agora.”
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.forum - a public meeting or assembly for open discussionforum - a public meeting or assembly for open discussion
group meeting, meeting - a formally arranged gathering; "next year the meeting will be in Chicago"; "the meeting elected a chairperson"
2.forum - a public facility to meet for open discussionforum - a public facility to meet for open discussion
facility, installation - a building or place that provides a particular service or is used for a particular industry; "the assembly plant is an enormous facility"

forum

noun
1. meeting, conference, assembly, meeting place, court, body, council, parliament, congress, gathering, diet, senate, rally, convention, tribunal (archaic or literary), seminar, get-together (informal), congregation, caucus (chiefly U.S. & Canad.), synod, convergence, symposium, hui (N.Z.), moot, assemblage, conclave, convocation, consistory (in various Churches), ecclesia (in Church use), colloquium, folkmoot (in medieval England) a forum where problems could be discussed
2. public square, court, square, chamber, platform, arena, pulpit, meeting place, amphitheatre, stage, rostrum, agora (in ancient Greece) Generals appeared before the excited crowds in the Forum.
Translations
ساحَه عامّه في روما القَديمَهسوق في المدن الرومانيّه القديمَه
fórum
forum
fórum
staîur ætlaîur til almennra umræînatorg
伝言板
forumas
diskusiju vietaforums
fórum
forum

forum

[ˈfɔːrəm] N (forums or fora (pl)) [ˈfɔːrə]foro m (fig) → tribunal m, foro m

forum

[ˈfɔːrəm] nforum m, tribune f
a forum for discussion → un forum de discussion

forum

nForum nt

forum

[ˈfɔːrəm] n (History) → foro (fig) → tribuna

forum

(ˈfoːrəm) noun
1. any public place in which discussions take place, speeches are made etc. In modern times the television studio is as much a forum for public opinion as the market-places of ancient Rome used to be.
2. a market-place in ancient Roman cities and towns.
References in classic literature ?
to prevent it from becoming merely a forum for invective.
He was to leave the city by the Porta del Popolo, skirt the outer wall, and re-enter by the Porta San Giovanni; thus they would behold the Colosseum without finding their impressions dulled by first looking on the Capitol, the Forum, the Arch of Septimus Severus, the Temple of Antoninus and Faustina, and the Via Sacra.
Charlotte, unselfish in the Forum, would have tried a sweeter temper than Lucy's, and once, in the Baths of Caracalla, they had doubted whether they could continue their tour.
He is reported also to have presented a person with a crown who adjudged the victory to another; and some say that it is the statue of that judge which is placed in the forum.
The evening was charming, and he promised himself the satisfaction of walking home beneath the Arch of Constantine and past the vaguely lighted monuments of the Forum.
We necessarily visited the Forum, where Caesar was assassinated, and also the Tarpeian Rock.
But, instead, he went into the Forum Cafe and ordered a breakfast that cost two dollars.
There was marked out the place for a temple, here the ground of a forum, on this spot the plan of a palace, in another the plateau for a citadel; the whole overlooked by a central mountain of
What is called eloquence in the forum is commonly found to be rhetoric in the study.
That age will be rich indeed when those relics which we call Classics, and the still older and more than classic but even less known Scriptures of the nations, shall have still further accumulated, when the Vaticans shall be filled with Vedas and Zendavestas and Bibles, with Homers and Dantes and Shakespeares, and all the centuries to come shall have successively deposited their trophies in the forum of the world.
In old Rome the public roads beginning at the Forum proceeded north, south, east, west, to the centre of every province of the empire, making each market-town of Persia, Spain and Britain pervious to the soldiers of the capital: so out of the human heart go as it were highways to the heart of every object in nature, to reduce it under the dominion of man.
Half a block on, passing the Forum Cafe, he stopped suddenly.