fossil


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fos·sil

 (fŏs′əl)
n.
1. A remnant or trace of an organism of a past geologic age, such as a skeleton or leaf imprint, embedded and preserved in the earth's crust.
2. One that is outdated or antiquated: He was viewed as a fossil after decades in the same job.
3. Linguistics
a. A word or morpheme that is used only in certain restricted contexts, as kempt in unkempt, but is otherwise obsolete.
b. An archaic syntactic rule or pattern used only in idioms, as so be it.
adj.
1. Characteristic of or having the nature of a fossil.
2. Being or similar to a fossil.
3. Belonging to the past; antiquated.

[From Latin fossilis, dug up, from fossus, past participle of fodere, to dig.]

fossil

(ˈfɒsəl)
n
1. (Palaeontology)
a. a relic, remnant, or representation of an organism that existed in a past geological age, or of the activity of such an organism, occurring in the form of mineralized bones, shells, etc, as casts, impressions, and moulds, and as frozen perfectly preserved organisms
b. (as modifier): fossil insects.
2. informal derogatory
a. a person, idea, thing, etc, that is outdated or incapable of change
b. (as modifier): fossil politicians.
3. (Linguistics) linguistics a form once current but now appearing only in one or two special contexts, as for example stead, which is found now only in instead (of) and in phrases like in his stead
4. obsolete any rock or mineral dug out of the earth
[C17: from Latin fossilis dug up, from fodere to dig]

fos•sil

(ˈfɒs əl)

n.
1. any preserved remains or imprint of a living organism, usu. of a former geologic age, as a bone, shell, or leaf impression.
2. a markedly outdated or old-fashioned person or thing.
3. an obsolete or archaic word preserved in certain restricted contexts, as nonce in for the nonce, or a construction following a pattern no longer productive in the language, as So be it.
adj.
4. of the nature of a fossil: fossil insects.
5. formed from the remains of prehistoric life, as coal or oil: fossil fuels; fossil resins.
6. antiquated.
[1555–65; < French fossile < Latin fossilisobtained by digging, derivative of fodere to dig]
fos′sil•like`, adj.

fos·sil

(fŏs′əl)
The hardened remains or imprint of a plant or animal that lived long ago. Fossils are often found in layers of sedimentary rock and along the beds of rivers that flow through them. Other sources of fossils include tar pits, ice, and amber. ♦ Petroleum, coal, and natural gas, which are derived from the accumulated remains of ancient plants and animals, are called fossil fuels.

fossilize verb

fossil

1. The remains of a prehistoric plant or animal found preserved in a solid, mineralized form in rocks or, sometimes, frozen in ice.
2. The remains or trace of an organism preserved in sedimentary rocks.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.fossil - someone whose style is out of fashion
colloquialism - a colloquial expression; characteristic of spoken or written communication that seeks to imitate informal speech
2.fossil - the remains (or an impression) of a plant or animal that existed in a past geological age and that has been excavated from the soil
fucoid - a fossilized cast or impression of algae of the order Fucales
belemnite - a conical calcareous fossil tapering to a point at one end and with a conical cavity at the other end containing (when unbroken) a small chambered phragmocone from the shell of any of numerous extinct cephalopods of the family Belemnitidae
ammonite, ammonoid - one of the coiled chambered fossil shells of extinct mollusks
guide fossil, index fossil - a fossil known to have lived in a particular geologic age that can be used to date the rock layer in which it is found
microfossil - a fossil that must be studied microscopically
remains - any object that is left unused or still extant; "I threw out the remains of my dinner"
wormcast - fossil trail of a worm
Adj.1.fossil - characteristic of a fossil

fossil

noun fossilized remains, remains, petrified remains, impression, relic They dissolved the fossil and extracted the DNA.

fossil

noun
An old-fashioned person who is reluctant to change or innovate:
Informal: stick-in-the-mud.
Slang: square.
Translations
مُتَحَجِّرَه
zkamenělina
fossilforstening
FossilInkluse
fossiili
fosil
kövület
steingervingur
化石
fosilijapaversti į akmenįsuakmenėjusi liekana
fosilija
skamenelina
okamnina

fossil

[ˈfɒsl]
A. Nfósil m
B. CPDfósil
fossil fuel Nhidrocarburo m

fossil

[ˈfɒsəl]
nfossile m
modif [collector, hunter] → de fossilesfossil energy nénergie f fossilefossil fuel ncombustible m fossile

fossil

n (lit)Fossil nt; he’s an old fossil! (inf)er ist so verknöchert
adjversteinert

fossil

[ˈfɒsl] n & adjfossile (m)

fossil

(ˈfosl) noun
the hardened remains of an animal or vegetable found in rock. Fossils have been found here which may be a million years old.
ˈfossilize, ˈfossilise verb
to change into a fossil. Time had fossilized the animal remains in the river-bed.
References in classic literature ?
Ere entering upon the subject of Fossil Whales, I present my credentials as a geologist, by stating that in my miscellaneous time i have been a stone-mason, and also a great digger of ditches, canals, and wells, wine-vaults, cellars, and cisterns of all sorts.
The geologist has discovered that the figures of serpents, griffins, flying dragons, and other fanciful embellishments of heraldry, have their prototypes in the forms of fossil species which were extinct before man was created, and hence "indicate a faint and shadowy knowledge of a previous state of organic existence.
It's a little out-of-the-way place, where they administer what is called ecclesiastical law, and play all kinds of tricks with obsolete old monsters of acts of Parliament, which three-fourths of the world know nothing about, and the other fourth supposes to have been dug up, in a fossil state, in the days of the Edwards.
Leave that old fossil, who'll be dead by to-morrow.
It reminded me of a sepia painting I had once seen done from the ink of a fossil Belemnite that must have perished and become fossilized millions of years ago.
It would do you good to walk there and back two or three times a day; besides, are you such a fossil that you never wish to see a flower or a green leaf?
These plains, however, had not always been equally destitute of wood, as was evident from the trunks of the trees which the travellers repeatedly met with, some still standing, others lying about in broken fragments, but all in a fossil state, having flourished in times long past.
You will observe from the cartilage that this is no fossil specimen, but recent.
Put a feather with a fossil and a bit of coral and everyone will think it's a specimen.
In short, in his bringing up he has been so nursed by Law and Equity that he has become a kind of fossil imp, to account for whose terrestrial existence it is reported at the public offices that his father was John Doe and his mother the only female member of the Roe family, also that his first long-clothes were made from a blue bag.
Ah, if I had only known then that he was only a common mortal, and that his mission had nothing more overpowering about it than the collecting of seeds and uncommon yams and extraordinary cabbages and peculiar bullfrogs for that poor, useless, innocent, mildewed old fossil the Smithsonian Institute, I would have felt so much relieved.
Hi, old fossil," cried the man who had first called on him for assistance, "did je think we wanted of you to read the bloomin' notis to yourself?