foul up


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foul

 (foul)
adj. foul·er, foul·est
1.
a. Offensive to the senses; revolting: "a foul little creature with greedy eyes and slobbering mouth" (J.R.R. Tolkien).
b. Having a bad odor or taste: foul breath; food that tasted foul.
c. Rotten or putrid: foul meat.
2.
a. Containing dirt, impurities, or other foreign matter; foul water.
b. Clogged or bestrewn with unwanted material: The bay is foul with old sunken vessels.
c. Overgrown or encrusted with weeds, barnacles, or other organisms. Used of a ship's bottom.
d. Entangled or enwrapped: a foul anchor.
3.
a. Morally detestable; wicked: foul deeds.
b. Vulgar or obscene: foul language.
c. Violating accepted standards or rules; dishonorable: used foul means to gain power.
4.
a. Very disagreeable or displeasing; horrid: a foul movie.
b. Inclement or unfavorable: in fair weather or foul.
c. Irritable or upset: in a foul mood.
5.
a. Sports Contrary to the rules of a game or sport: a foul boxing punch.
b. Baseball Outside the foul lines: a foul fly ball.
6. Marked with editorial changes or corrections: foul copy.
7. Archaic Ugly; unattractive.
n.
1. Abbr. F
a. Sports An infraction or a violation of the rules of play.
b. Baseball A foul ball.
2. An entanglement or a collision.
3. An instance of clogging or obstructing.
4. A foul copy of a document.
adv.
In a foul manner.
v. fouled, foul·ing, fouls
v.tr.
1. To make dirty or foul; pollute. See Synonyms at contaminate.
2. To bring into dishonor; besmirch.
3. To clog or obstruct.
4. To entangle or catch (a rope, for example).
5. To encrust (a ship's hull) with foreign matter, such as barnacles.
6.
a. Sports To commit a foul against.
b. Baseball To hit (a ball) outside the foul lines.
v.intr.
1. To become foul.
2.
a. Sports To commit a foul.
b. Baseball To hit a ball outside the foul lines: fouled twice and then struck out; fouled out to the catcher.
3. To become entangled or twisted: The anchor line fouled on a rock.
4. To become clogged or obstructed.
Phrasal Verbs:
foul out
Sports To be put out of a game for exceeding the number of permissible fouls.
foul up
To blunder or cause to blunder because of mistakes or poor judgment.

[Middle English, from Old English fūl; see pū̆- in Indo-European roots.]

foul′ly adv.
foul′ness n.

foul up

vb (adverb)
1. (tr) to bungle; mismanage
2. (tr) to make dirty; contaminate
3. to be or cause to be blocked, choked, or entangled
n
a state of confusion or muddle caused by bungling
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.foul up - make a mess of, destroy or ruinfoul up - make a mess of, destroy or ruin; "I botched the dinner and we had to eat out"; "the pianist screwed up the difficult passage in the second movement"
go wrong, miscarry, fail - be unsuccessful; "Where do today's public schools fail?"; "The attempt to rescue the hostages failed miserably"

foul

adjective
1. Extremely unpleasant to the senses or feelings:
2. Having an unpleasant odor:
Informal: smelly.
3. Heavily soiled; very dirty or unclean:
4. Offensive to accepted standards of decency:
Slang: raunchy.
verb
1. To make physically impure:
2. To twist together so that separation is difficult:
phrasal verb
foul up
To harm irreparably through inept handling; make a mess:
Informal: bollix up, muck up.
Idiom: make a muck of.
Translations

w>foul up

vt sep (inf)versauen (inf)
References in periodicals archive ?
And the question which must be asked in both cases is whether these penalties are actually punitive enough to hurt these companies in a way which ensures no future foul ups and at the same time discourages others from offending.