fouled


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Idioms, Encyclopedia.
Related to fouled: fouled up

foul

 (foul)
adj. foul·er, foul·est
1.
a. Offensive to the senses; revolting: "a foul little creature with greedy eyes and slobbering mouth" (J.R.R. Tolkien).
b. Having a bad odor or taste: foul breath; food that tasted foul.
c. Rotten or putrid: foul meat.
2.
a. Containing dirt, impurities, or other foreign matter; foul water.
b. Clogged or bestrewn with unwanted material: The bay is foul with old sunken vessels.
c. Overgrown or encrusted with weeds, barnacles, or other organisms. Used of a ship's bottom.
d. Entangled or enwrapped: a foul anchor.
3.
a. Morally detestable; wicked: foul deeds.
b. Vulgar or obscene: foul language.
c. Violating accepted standards or rules; dishonorable: used foul means to gain power.
4.
a. Very disagreeable or displeasing; horrid: a foul movie.
b. Inclement or unfavorable: in fair weather or foul.
c. Irritable or upset: in a foul mood.
5.
a. Sports Contrary to the rules of a game or sport: a foul boxing punch.
b. Baseball Outside the foul lines: a foul fly ball.
6. Marked with editorial changes or corrections: foul copy.
7. Archaic Ugly; unattractive.
n.
1. Abbr. F
a. Sports An infraction or a violation of the rules of play.
b. Baseball A foul ball.
2. An entanglement or a collision.
3. An instance of clogging or obstructing.
4. A foul copy of a document.
adv.
In a foul manner.
v. fouled, foul·ing, fouls
v.tr.
1. To make dirty or foul; pollute. See Synonyms at contaminate.
2. To bring into dishonor; besmirch.
3. To clog or obstruct.
4. To entangle or catch (a rope, for example).
5. To encrust (a ship's hull) with foreign matter, such as barnacles.
6.
a. Sports To commit a foul against.
b. Baseball To hit (a ball) outside the foul lines.
v.intr.
1. To become foul.
2.
a. Sports To commit a foul.
b. Baseball To hit a ball outside the foul lines: fouled twice and then struck out; fouled out to the catcher.
3. To become entangled or twisted: The anchor line fouled on a rock.
4. To become clogged or obstructed.
Phrasal Verbs:
foul out
Sports To be put out of a game for exceeding the number of permissible fouls.
foul up
To blunder or cause to blunder because of mistakes or poor judgment.

[Middle English, from Old English fūl; see pū̆- in Indo-European roots.]

foul′ly adv.
foul′ness n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.fouled - made dirty or foulfouled - made dirty or foul; "a building befouled with soot"; "breathing air fouled and darkened with factory soot"
dirty, soiled, unclean - soiled or likely to soil with dirt or grime; "dirty unswept sidewalks"; "a child in dirty overalls"; "dirty slums"; "piles of dirty dishes"; "put his dirty feet on the clean sheet"; "wore an unclean shirt"; "mining is a dirty job"; "Cinderella did the dirty work while her sisters preened themselves"
2.fouled - especially of a ship's lines etcfouled - especially of a ship's lines etc; "with its sails afoul"; "a foul anchor"
tangled - in a confused mass; "pushed back her tangled hair"; "the tangled ropes"
References in classic literature ?
First off, I flew thirty yards, and then fouled an Irishman and brought him down - brought us both down, in fact.
I ran to fetch it, but I was quite unsteadied by all that had fallen out, and I broke one glass and fouled the tap, and while I was still getting in my own way, I heard a loud fall in the parlour, and running in, beheld the captain lying full length upon the floor.
Until the other, who has fouled your sweet life, is true dead you must not die.
There was a tattered man, fouled with dust, blood and powder stain from hair to shoes, who trudged quietly at the youth's side.
The hook had fouled among a bunch of strawberries, red on one side and white on the other - perfect reproductions of the land fruit, except that there were no leaves, and the stem was all pipy and slimy.
But now all that life-and-death fun was ended, and the Jungle People came up, starved and weary, to the shrunken river,--tiger, bear, deer, buffalo, and pig, all together,--drank the fouled waters, and hung above them, too exhausted to move off.
Instead, they rushed me--the three of them simultaneously; and it was that which gave me an advantage, for they fouled one another in the narrow precincts of the balcony, so that the foremost of them stumbled full upon my blade at the first onslaught.
Butteridge had already discovered, they had fouled a fold of silk in the throat.
Lashed to the gunwale close at hand a single landing leather that had not fouled the tangled mass beneath whipped free from the ship's side, the hook snapping at its outer end.
I missed stays, pretty as you please, and the Flibberty drifted down on him and fouled him, and we went ashore together in as nice a mess as you ever want to see.
But the chain remained tangled, and amid all kinds of mocking advice we drifted down upon and fouled the Ghost, whose bowsprit poked square through our mainsail and ripped a hole in it as big as a barn door.