foulness


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foul

 (foul)
adj. foul·er, foul·est
1.
a. Offensive to the senses; revolting: "a foul little creature with greedy eyes and slobbering mouth" (J.R.R. Tolkien).
b. Having a bad odor or taste: foul breath; food that tasted foul.
c. Rotten or putrid: foul meat.
2.
a. Containing dirt, impurities, or other foreign matter; foul water.
b. Clogged or bestrewn with unwanted material: The bay is foul with old sunken vessels.
c. Overgrown or encrusted with weeds, barnacles, or other organisms. Used of a ship's bottom.
d. Entangled or enwrapped: a foul anchor.
3.
a. Morally detestable; wicked: foul deeds.
b. Vulgar or obscene: foul language.
c. Violating accepted standards or rules; dishonorable: used foul means to gain power.
4.
a. Very disagreeable or displeasing; horrid: a foul movie.
b. Inclement or unfavorable: in fair weather or foul.
c. Irritable or upset: in a foul mood.
5.
a. Sports Contrary to the rules of a game or sport: a foul boxing punch.
b. Baseball Outside the foul lines: a foul fly ball.
6. Marked with editorial changes or corrections: foul copy.
7. Archaic Ugly; unattractive.
n.
1. Abbr. F
a. Sports An infraction or a violation of the rules of play.
b. Baseball A foul ball.
2. An entanglement or a collision.
3. An instance of clogging or obstructing.
4. A foul copy of a document.
adv.
In a foul manner.
v. fouled, foul·ing, fouls
v.tr.
1. To make dirty or foul; pollute. See Synonyms at contaminate.
2. To bring into dishonor; besmirch.
3. To clog or obstruct.
4. To entangle or catch (a rope, for example).
5. To encrust (a ship's hull) with foreign matter, such as barnacles.
6.
a. Sports To commit a foul against.
b. Baseball To hit (a ball) outside the foul lines.
v.intr.
1. To become foul.
2.
a. Sports To commit a foul.
b. Baseball To hit a ball outside the foul lines: fouled twice and then struck out; fouled out to the catcher.
3. To become entangled or twisted: The anchor line fouled on a rock.
4. To become clogged or obstructed.
Phrasal Verbs:
foul out
Sports To be put out of a game for exceeding the number of permissible fouls.
foul up
To blunder or cause to blunder because of mistakes or poor judgment.

[Middle English, from Old English fūl; see pū̆- in Indo-European roots.]

foul′ly adv.
foul′ness n.

foulness

(ˈfaʊlnɪs)
n
1. the state or quality of being foul
2. obscenity; vulgarity
3. viciousness or inhumanity
4. foul matter; filth

Foulness

(faʊlˈnɛs)
n
(Placename) a flat marshy island in SE England, in Essex north of the Thames estuary
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.foulness - disgusting wickedness and immorality; "he understood the foulness of sin"; "his display of foulness deserved severe punishment"; "mouths which speak such foulness must be cleansed"
iniquity, wickedness, dark, darkness - absence of moral or spiritual values; "the powers of darkness"
2.foulness - a state characterized by foul or disgusting dirt and refusefoulness - a state characterized by foul or disgusting dirt and refuse
unsanitariness - a state that is not conducive to health
3.foulness - (of weather) the badness of the weather; "they were wearied with the foulness of the weather"
severeness, severity, badness - used of the degree of something undesirable e.g. pain or weather
4.foulness - the attribute of having a strong offensive smellfoulness - the attribute of having a strong offensive smell
aroma, odor, olfactory property, odour, smell, scent - any property detected by the olfactory system
B.O., body odor, body odour - malodorousness resulting from a failure to bathe

foulness

noun
Translations

foulness

n
(= disgusting nature, of place, food, taste, smell, breath) → Widerlichkeit f; (of water)Fauligkeit f; (of air)Stickigkeit f
(= dreadfulness) (of behaviour, crime)Abscheulichkeit f; (of day, weather)Scheußlichkeit f (inf); the foulness of his behaviour (Brit) or behavior (US) to her, his foulness to hersein gemeines Verhalten or seine Gemeinheit ihr gegenüber; the foulness of her moodihre ganz üble Laune; the foulness of her temperihre schreckliche Übellaunigkeit
(of language)Unflätigkeit f
References in classic literature ?
And though now nailed amidst all the rustiness of iron bolts and the verdigris of copper spikes, yet, untouchable and immaculate to any foulness, it still preserved its Quito glow.
The men who worked on the killing beds would come to reek with foulness, so that you could smell one of them fifty feet away; there was simply no such thing as keeping decent, the most careful man gave it up in the end, and wallowed in uncleanness.
It was true that the portrait still preserved, under all the foulness and ugliness of the face, its marked likeness to himself; but what could they learn from that?
We passed through a range of low arches, descended, passed on, and descending again, arrived at a deep crypt, in which the foulness of the air caused our flambeaux rather to glow than flame.
There have been from the loins of this very one great men and good women, and their graves make sacred the earth where alone this foulness can dwell.
I was only glad to be quit of the foulness of the Beast People.
For after the sailors could no longer come up the Thames, they came on to the Essex coast, to Harwich and Walton and Clacton, and afterwards to Foulness and Shoebury, to bring off the people.
Is it to the Lord's house that you come to pour forth the foulness of your heart and the inspiration of the devil?
Think of the hypocrite with his greasy smile penning his leading article, and arranging the foulness of the public placard.
For aviaries, I like them not, except they be of that largeness as they may be turfed, and have living plants and bushes set in them; that the birds may have more scope, and natural nesting, and that no foulness appear in the floor of the aviary.
Decamnichus also was the chief cause of the conspiracy against Archelaus, for he urged others on: the occasion of his resentment was his having delivered him to Euripides the poet to be scourged; for Euripides was greatly offended with him for having said something of the foulness of his breath.
I think that a good deal of its foulness was lost upon me, but I certainly understood that it would not do to present it to an American public just as it was, in the translation which I presently planned to make.