found object


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found object

n.
A natural object or an artifact not originally intended as art, found and considered to have aesthetic value. Also called objet trouvé.

[Translation of French objet trouvé : objet, object + trouvé, past participle of trouver, to find.]

found object

n
another name for objet trouvé

found′ ob′ject


n.
a natural or manufactured object that is perceived as being aesthetically satisfying and is exhibited as such.
[1955–60; translation of French objet trouvé]
References in periodicals archive ?
FROM DUCHAMP TO GARBAGE: THE LEGACY OF THE FOUND OBJECT
Running through May 13, the exhibition includes figurative painting, pastel drawing, urban cityscapes, found object mosaics and sculpture.
The book itself has the appearance of a found object using a scrapbook style of presentation with the text appearing as if typed on scraps of paper roughly taped onto the page.
Also, the newly found object, along with Pluto, may be one of many objects residing in the Kuiper belt.
Wendy Parry, museum and galleries manager, said: "They can be as creative as they like and bring in a found object that symbolises their life in some way, or a photograph representing their ideas.
Harry Anderson's work shows his affinity for the found object.
Best known for her found object media sculptures that reflect the past and memory, Kokin addresses various aspects of the human condition and longing for days gone by.
Often, he presents a single item of this sort as a found object.
Calculations by Syuichi Nakano, working at the Harvard Smithsonian Center, have revealed not only that the newly found object and HAPAG are one and the same, but also that HAPAG appears on several photographic plates taken in the 1950s and 1980s, though it was not identified at the time.
Both, however, are mainly deployed in service of a regime of the found object, suggesting in particular those early conceptual riffs on the form of the photoessay, such as Smithson's "A Tour of the Monuments of Passaic, New Jersey" (1967) and Dan Graham's "Homes for America" (1966)--with which so-called advanced art began the exodus first out of the gallery, then out of New York City as the second "capital of modern art.
Cut: Film as Found Object in Contemporary Video," curated by Stefano Basilico, attempts to plot the current value of one strand of the collage aesthetic through a selection of recent video art constructed from preexisting film footage.