founded


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found 1

 (found)
tr.v. found·ed, found·ing, founds
1. To establish or set up, especially with provision for continuing existence: The college was founded in 1872. See Synonyms at establish.
2. To establish the foundation or basis of; base: found a theory on firm evidence.

[Middle English founden, from Old French fonder, from Latin fundāre, from fundus, bottom.]

found 2

 (found)
tr.v. found·ed, found·ing, founds
1. To melt (metal) and pour into a mold.
2. To make (objects) by pouring molten material into a mold.

[Middle English founden, from Old French fondre, from Latin fundere; see gheu- in Indo-European roots.]

found 3

 (found)
v.
Past tense and past participle of find.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:

founded

adjective
founded on based on, built on, rooted in, grounded on, established on His game is founded on power and determination.
Translations

founded

[ˈfaʊndɪd] adj
to be founded on sth → être basé(e) sur qch
References in classic literature ?
For various reasons, however, and from impressions often too vaguely founded to be put on paper, the writer cherishes the belief that many, if not most, of the successive proprietors of this estate were troubled with doubts as to their moral right to hold it.
In connexion with this appellative of Whalebone whales , it is of great importance to mention, that however such a nomenclature may be convenient in facilitating allusions to some kind of whales, yet it is in vain to attempt a clear classification of the Leviathan, founded upon either his baleen, or hump, or fin, or teeth; notwithstanding that those marked parts or features very obviously seem better adapted to afford the basis for a regular system of Cetology than any other detached bodily distinctions, which the whale, in his kinds, presents.
The anatomical fact of this labyrinth is indisputable; and that the supposition founded upon it is reasonable and true, seems the more cogent to me, when I consider the otherwise inexplicable obstinacy of that leviathan in having his spoutings out, as the fishermen phrase it.
I was from Con- necticut, whose Constitution declares "that all political power is inherent in the people, and all free govern- ments are founded on their authority and instituted for their benefit; and that they have AT ALL TIMES an undeni- able and indefeasible right to ALTER THEIR FORM OF GOVERN- MENT in such a manner as they may think expedient.
But, as it was, she only learned, from some very significant looks, how far their penetration, founded on Margaret's instructions, extended.
I do not doubt it," replied he, rather astonished at her earnestness and warmth; for had he not imagined it to be a joke for the good of her acquaintance in general, founded only on a something or a nothing between Mr.
Although they firmly believed their good opinion of Frank to be well founded -- still, in the interest of their daughter's happiness, it was necessary to put that opinion firmly to the proof, by fixing certain conditions, and by interposing a year of delay between the contemplated marriage and the present time.
I can make no claim therefore to have known, at that time, how matters stood; or to have any remembrance, founded on the evidence of my own senses, of what follows.
When the robbery was talked of at the Rainbow and elsewhere, in good company, the balance continued to waver between the rational explanation founded on the tinder-box, and the theory of an impenetrable mystery that mocked investigation.
All romance, like all temptation, is founded on the Fascination of the Exception.
For Spirits when they please Can either Sex assume, or both; so soft And uncompounded is their Essence pure, Not ti'd or manacl'd with joynt or limb, Nor founded on the brittle strength of bones, Like cumbrous flesh; but in what shape they choose Dilated or condens't, bright or obscure, Can execute their aerie purposes, And works of love or enmity fulfill.
e of our forefathers; indeed, I am convinced, that however I myself may fail in the ensuing attempt, yet, with more labour in collecting, or more skill in using, the materials within his reach, illustrated as they have been by the labours of Dr Henry, of the late Mr Strutt, and, above all, of Mr Sharon Turner, an abler hand would have been successful; and therefore I protest, beforehand, against any argument which may be founded on the failure of the present experiment.

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