founder

(redirected from founders)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia.

foun·der 1

 (foun′dər)
v. foun·dered, foun·der·ing, foun·ders
v.intr.
1. To sink below the surface of the water: The ship struck a reef and foundered.
2. To cave in; sink: The platform swayed and then foundered.
3. To fail utterly; collapse: a marriage that soon foundered.
4. To stumble, especially to stumble and go lame. Used of horses.
5. To become ill from overeating. Used of livestock.
6. To be afflicted with laminitis. Used of horses.
v.tr.
To cause to founder: A large wave foundered the boat.
n.

[Middle English foundren, to sink to the ground, from Old French fondrer, from Vulgar Latin *funderāre, from *fundus, *funder-, bottom, from Latin fundus, fund-.]
Usage Note: The verbs founder and flounder are often confused. Founder comes from a Latin word meaning "bottom" (as in foundation) and originally referred to knocking enemies down; it is now also used to mean "to fail utterly, collapse." Flounder means "to move clumsily, thrash about," and hence "to proceed in confusion." If John is foundering in Chemistry 101, he had better drop the course; if he is floundering, he may yet pull through.

found·er 2

 (foun′dər)
n.
One who establishes something or formulates the basis for something: the founder of a university.

founder

(ˈfaʊndə)
n
a person who establishes an institution, company, society, etc
[C14: see found2]

founder

(ˈfaʊndə)
vb (intr)
1. (Nautical Terms) (of a ship) to sink
2. to break down or fail: the project foundered.
3. to sink into or become stuck in soft ground
4. to fall in or give way; collapse
5. (Veterinary Science) (of a horse) to stumble or go lame
6. (Veterinary Science) archaic (of animals, esp livestock) to become ill from overeating
n
(Veterinary Science) vet science another name for laminitis
[C13: from Old French fondrer to submerge, from Latin fundus bottom; see found2]
Usage: Founder is sometimes wrongly used where flounder is meant: this unexpected turn of events left him floundering (not foundering)

founder

(ˈfaʊndə)
n
(Professions)
a. a person who makes metal castings
b. (in combination): an iron founder.
[C15: see found3]

found•er1

(ˈfaʊn dər)

n.
one who founds or establishes.
[1275–1325]

foun•der2

(ˈfaʊn dər)

v.i.
1. to fill with water and sink: The ship foundered.
2. to sink; subside.
3. to become wrecked; fail utterly: The project foundered.
4. (of a horse) to suffer from laminitis.
v.t.
5. to cause to suffer from laminitis.
n.
[1300–50; Middle English < Middle French fondrer « Latin fundus bottom]

found•er3

(ˈfaʊn dər)

n.
one who founds metal or type.
[1175–1225]

founder


Past participle: foundered
Gerund: foundering

Imperative
founder
founder
Present
I founder
you founder
he/she/it founders
we founder
you founder
they founder
Preterite
I foundered
you foundered
he/she/it foundered
we foundered
you foundered
they foundered
Present Continuous
I am foundering
you are foundering
he/she/it is foundering
we are foundering
you are foundering
they are foundering
Present Perfect
I have foundered
you have foundered
he/she/it has foundered
we have foundered
you have foundered
they have foundered
Past Continuous
I was foundering
you were foundering
he/she/it was foundering
we were foundering
you were foundering
they were foundering
Past Perfect
I had foundered
you had foundered
he/she/it had foundered
we had foundered
you had foundered
they had foundered
Future
I will founder
you will founder
he/she/it will founder
we will founder
you will founder
they will founder
Future Perfect
I will have foundered
you will have foundered
he/she/it will have foundered
we will have foundered
you will have foundered
they will have foundered
Future Continuous
I will be foundering
you will be foundering
he/she/it will be foundering
we will be foundering
you will be foundering
they will be foundering
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been foundering
you have been foundering
he/she/it has been foundering
we have been foundering
you have been foundering
they have been foundering
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been foundering
you will have been foundering
he/she/it will have been foundering
we will have been foundering
you will have been foundering
they will have been foundering
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been foundering
you had been foundering
he/she/it had been foundering
we had been foundering
you had been foundering
they had been foundering
Conditional
I would founder
you would founder
he/she/it would founder
we would founder
you would founder
they would founder
Past Conditional
I would have foundered
you would have foundered
he/she/it would have foundered
we would have foundered
you would have foundered
they would have foundered
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.founder - inflammation of the laminated tissue that attaches the hoof to the foot of a horse
inflammation, redness, rubor - a response of body tissues to injury or irritation; characterized by pain and swelling and redness and heat
2.founder - a person who founds or establishes some institutionfounder - a person who founds or establishes some institution; "George Washington is the father of his country"
cofounder - one of a group of founders
coloniser, colonizer - someone who helps to found a colony
foundress - a woman founder
conceiver, mastermind, originator - someone who creates new things
3.founder - a worker who makes metal castings
bell founder - a person who casts metal bells
skilled worker, skilled workman, trained worker - a worker who has acquired special skills
Verb1.founder - fail utterly; collapse; "The project foundered"
go wrong, miscarry, fail - be unsuccessful; "Where do today's public schools fail?"; "The attempt to rescue the hostages failed miserably"
2.founder - sink below the surface
go under, go down, sink, settle - go under, "The raft sank and its occupants drowned"
3.founder - break down, literally or metaphoricallyfounder - break down, literally or metaphorically; "The wall collapsed"; "The business collapsed"; "The dam broke"; "The roof collapsed"; "The wall gave in"; "The roof finally gave under the weight of the ice"
change - undergo a change; become different in essence; losing one's or its original nature; "She changed completely as she grew older"; "The weather changed last night"
implode, go off - burst inward; "The bottle imploded"
abandon, give up - stop maintaining or insisting on; of ideas or claims; "He abandoned the thought of asking for her hand in marriage"; "Both sides have to give up some claims in these negotiations"
buckle, crumple - fold or collapse; "His knees buckled"
flop - fall loosely; "He flopped into a chair"
break - curl over and fall apart in surf or foam, of waves; "The surf broke"
slide down, slump, sink - fall or sink heavily; "He slumped onto the couch"; "My spirits sank"
collapse, burst - cause to burst; "The ice broke the pipe"
4.founder - stumble and nearly fall; "the horses foundered"
trip, stumble - miss a step and fall or nearly fall; "She stumbled over the tree root"

founder

1

founder

2
verb
2. sink, go down, be lost, submerge, capsize, go to the bottom Three ships foundered in heavy seas.
Usage: Founder is sometimes wrongly used where flounder is meant: this unexpected turn of events left him floundering (not foundering).

founder 1

verb
To go beneath the surface or to the bottom of a liquid:

founder 2

noun
One that creates, founds, or originates:
Translations
مؤَسِّس
zakladatel
grundlæggerstifter
asutaja
stofnandi
fundatorzałożyciel
zakladateľ
ustanovitelj
kurucu

founder

1 [ˈfaʊndəʳ]
A. N (= originator) → fundador(a) m/f
B. CPD founder member N (Brit) → miembro mf fundador(a)

founder

2 [ˈfaʊndəʳ] VI (Naut) → hundirse, irse a pique (fig) → fracasar (on debido a)

founder

[ˈfaʊndər]
nfondateur/trice m/f
vi
[ship] → couler, sombrer
[negotiations, talks] → échouerfounder member n (British)membre m fondateurfounding father n (= founder) [institution, organization, idea] → père m fondateurFounding Fathers npl
the Founding Fathers → les pères mpl fondateurs

founder

1
n (of school, colony, organization etc)Gründer(in) m(f); (of charity, museum)Stifter(in) m(f)

founder

2
vi
(ship: = sink) → sinken, untergehen
(horse etc: = stumble) → straucheln, stolpern
(fig: = fail, plan, project) → scheitern, fehlschlagen; (hopes)auf den Nullpunkt sinken

founder

3
n (Metal) → Gießer(in) m(f)

founder

1 [ˈfaʊndəʳ] nfondatore/trice

founder

2 [ˈfaʊndəʳ] vi (Naut) (also) (fig) → affondare, colare a picco

found2

(faund) verb
1. to start or establish. The school was founded by the king.
2. (with on/upon) to base on. The story was founded upon fact.
founˈdation noun
1. the act of founding. the foundation of a new university.
2. the base on which something is built. First they laid the foundations, then they built the walls.
3. an amount of money to be used for a special purpose or the organization that manages it. The British Foundation for Cancer Research.
ˈfounder noun
a person who founds a school, college, organization etc. We commemorate the founder of the school.
ˈfounding noun
The founding of the organization took place a long time ago.
ˈfounding ˈfather noun
1. the first or one of the first founders of an organization, a school of thought etc. the founding father of psychoanalysis.
2. The Founding Fathers of the United States of America were the people who drew up its constitution.
References in classic literature ?
The true marshalling of the degrees of sovereign honor, are these: In the first place are conditores imperiorum, founders of states and commonwealths; such as were Romulus, Cyrus, Caesar, Ottoman, Ismael.
This is indeed a very simple account of the matter; for if citizens are so, according to this definition, it will be impossible to apply it to the first founders or first inhabitants of states, who cannot possibly claim in right either of their father or mother.
Finally, at the suggestion of the International League of Cannon Founders, which had important branches in both countries, they decided to refer their claims to the Bumbo of Jiam, and abide by his judgment.
The founders of a new colony, whatever Utopia of human virtue and happiness they might originally project, have invariably recognised it among their earliest practical necessities to allot a portion of the virgin soil as a cemetery, and another portion as the site of a prison.
She dips her rim, She sinks, she founders in the mist; and still The stream flows on, and to the insatiate sea Hurries her white-wave flocks innumerable In never-ending tale.
When our founders boldly declared America's independence to the world, and our purposes to the Almighty, they knew that America, to endure, would have to change.
Of those that began great and ended in a point, there are thousands of examples, for all the Pharaohs and Ptolemies of Egypt, the Caesars of Rome, and the whole herd (if I may such a word to them) of countless princes, monarchs, lords, Medes, Assyrians, Persians, Greeks, and barbarians, all these lineages and lordships have ended in a point and come to nothing, they themselves as well as their founders, for it would be impossible now to find one of their descendants, and, even should we find one, it would be in some lowly and humble condition.
The founders of your race are not handed down to you, like the fathers of the Roman people, as the sucklings of a wolf.
Two months previously when Pierre was already staying with the Rostovs he had received a letter from Prince Theodore, asking him to come to Petersburg to confer on some important questions that were being discussed there by a society of which Pierre was one of the principal founders.
I said to him, You and I, Adeimantus, at this moment are not poets, but founders of a State: now the founders of a State ought to know the general forms in which poets should cast their tales, and the limits which must be observed by them, but to make the tales is not their business.
Towards evening the mate and boatswain begged the master of our ship to let them cut away the fore-mast, which he was very unwilling to do; but the boatswain protesting to him that if he did not the ship would founder, he consented; and when they had cut away the fore-mast, the main-mast stood so loose, and shook the ship so much, they were obliged to cut that away also, and make a clear deck.
The bicentenary loomed but a year ahead, and a movement was on foot to mark the epoch with an adequate statue of our pious founder.