four-in-hand


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four-in-hand

(fôr′ĭn-hănd′)
n.
1. A team of four horses controlled by one driver.
2. A vehicle drawn by four horses.
3. A necktie tied in a slipknot with long ends left hanging one in front of the other.

four-in-hand

n
1. (Automotive Engineering) Also called: tally-ho a road vehicle drawn by four horses and driven by one driver
2. (Horse Training, Riding & Manège) a four-horse team in a coach or carriage
3. (Clothing & Fashion) a long narrow tie formerly worn tied in a flat slipknot with the ends dangling

four′-in-hand`



n.
1. a long necktie to be tied in a slipknot with the ends left hanging.
2. a vehicle drawn by four horses and driven by one person.
3. a team of four horses.
[1785–95]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.four-in-hand - a long necktie that is tied in a slipknot with one end hanging in front of the otherfour-in-hand - a long necktie that is tied in a slipknot with one end hanging in front of the other
necktie, tie - neckwear consisting of a long narrow piece of material worn (mostly by men) under a collar and tied in knot at the front; "he stood in front of the mirror tightening his necktie"; "he wore a vest and tie"
2.four-in-hand - a carriage pulled by four horses with one driver
box seat, box - the driver's seat on a coach; "an armed guard sat in the box with the driver"
carriage, equipage, rig - a vehicle with wheels drawn by one or more horses
stagecoach, stage - a large coach-and-four formerly used to carry passengers and mail on regular routes between towns; "we went out of town together by stage about ten or twelve miles"
References in classic literature ?
The tourist, the valetudinarian, or the amateur of the beauties of nature, who, in the train of his four-in-hand, now rolls through the scenes we have attempted to describe, in quest of information, health, or pleasure, or floats steadily toward his object on those artificial waters which have sprung up under the administration of a statesman* who has dared to stake his political character on the hazardous issue, is not to suppose that his ancestors traversed those hills, or struggled with the same currents with equal facility.
He was a first-rate driver; he could take a four-in-hand or a tandem as easily as a pair.
he exclaimed; but at that moment the Duke of Berwick's four-in-hand came between, and when it had left the space clear, the carriage had swept out of the park.