fourth dimension


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fourth dimension

n.
Time regarded as a coordinate dimension and required by relativity theory, along with three spatial dimensions, to specify completely the location of any event.

fourth dimension

n
1. (General Physics) the dimension of time, which is necessary in addition to three spatial dimensions to specify fully the position and behaviour of a point or particle
2. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) the concept in science fiction of a dimension in addition to three spatial dimensions, used to explain supernatural phenomena, events, etc
ˌfourth-diˈmensional adj

fourth′ dimen′sion


n.
1. a dimension, usu. time, in addition to length, width, and depth, used to discuss phenomena that depend on four variables in geometrical language.
2. something beyond scientific explanation.
[1870–75]
fourth′-di•men′sion•al, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.fourth dimension - the fourth coordinate that is required (along with three spatial dimensions) to specify a physical event
dimension - the magnitude of something in a particular direction (especially length or width or height)
Translations

fourth dimension

n the fourth dimensionla quarta dimensione
References in classic literature ?
Really this is what is meant by the Fourth Dimension, though some people who talk about the Fourth Dimension do not know they mean it.
But,' said the Medical Man, staring hard at a coal in the fire, `if Time is really only a fourth dimension of Space, why is it, and why has it always been, regarded as something different?
Among themselves they communicate by means of what Perry says must be a sixth sense which is cognizant of a fourth dimension.
What they do," said Perry, "is to project their thoughts into the fourth dimension, when they become appreciable to the sixth sense of their listener.
Or if this postulate is as untenable as all the others, still I am very glad that I did not then lose any fact of the majesty, and beauty, and pathos of the great certain measures for the sake of that fourth dimension of the poem which is not yet made palpable or visible.
It was like encountering an inhabitant of the fourth dimension of space, a being who was free from all one's own limitations.
Sarah Frost, the novelist, came with her husband, a very genial and placid old scholar who had become slightly deranged upon the subject of the fourth dimension.
From some conning-tower in this fourth dimension he perceived himself eating broiled lobster and drinking champagne and heard himself bearing an adequate part in the conversation; but his movements were largely automatic.
She had spent her life over the dish-pan and she knew no more about the world than I do of the fourth dimension, or the fifth.
He had thoughts on the border of thought; fancies about a fourth dimension which was itself a hole to hide anything, of seeing everything from a new angle out of a new window in the senses; or of some mystical light and transparency, like the new rays of chemistry, in which he could see Bulmer's body, horrible and glaring, floating in a lurid halo over the woods and the wall.
The author admits that the fourth dimension has a robust history of representation in science fiction.
To translate the spatial symmetry of a regular crystal into the fourth dimension, the atoms in such a "time crystal" would have to continuously rotate and return to their original location.