fowl


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Related to fowl: fowl cholera

fowl

 (foul)
n. pl. fowl or fowls
1. Any of various birds of the order Galliformes, especially the common, widely domesticated chicken (Gallus domesticus).
2.
a. A bird, such as a duck, goose, turkey, or pheasant, that is used as food or hunted as game.
b. The flesh of such birds used as food.
3. A bird of any kind.
intr.v. fowled, fowl·ing, fowls
To hunt, trap, or shoot wildfowl.

[Middle English foul, from Old English fugol; see pleu- in Indo-European roots.]

fowl′er n.

fowl

(faʊl)
n
1. (Animals) See domestic fowl
2. (Animals) any other bird, esp any gallinaceous bird, that is used as food or hunted as game. See also waterfowl, wildfowl
3. (Cookery) the flesh or meat of fowl, esp of chicken
4. (Animals) an archaic word for any bird
vb
(Hunting) (intr) to hunt or snare wildfowl
[Old English fugol; related to Old Frisian fugel, Old Norse fogl, Gothic fugls, Old High German fogal]

fowl

(faʊl)

n., pl. fowls, (esp. collectively) fowl,
n.
1. any domestic hen or rooster; chicken.
2. any of several other, usu. gallinaceous, birds, as turkeys or pheasants.
3. a full-grown domestic fowl for food purposes, as distinguished from a chicken or young fowl.
4. the flesh or meat of a domestic fowl.
5. any bird (used chiefly in combination): waterfowl; wildfowl.
v.i.
6. to hunt or take wildfowl.
[before 900; Middle English foul, Old English fugol, fugel; c. Old Saxon fugal, Old High German fogal]

fowl

(foul)
1. A bird, such as a chicken, duck, or dove, that is raised or hunted for food.
2. In scientific usage, any of various birds having large heavy bodies, short wings, and legs built for running and scratching the ground. Most fowl nest on the ground. The turkey, pheasant, quail, grouse, partridge, and chicken are fowl.

fowl

, poultry - Chickens, ducks, geese, pheasants, and turkey are fowl in the wild and poultry if domesticated.
See also related terms for poultry.

fowl


Past participle: fowled
Gerund: fowling

Imperative
fowl
fowl
Present
I fowl
you fowl
he/she/it fowls
we fowl
you fowl
they fowl
Preterite
I fowled
you fowled
he/she/it fowled
we fowled
you fowled
they fowled
Present Continuous
I am fowling
you are fowling
he/she/it is fowling
we are fowling
you are fowling
they are fowling
Present Perfect
I have fowled
you have fowled
he/she/it has fowled
we have fowled
you have fowled
they have fowled
Past Continuous
I was fowling
you were fowling
he/she/it was fowling
we were fowling
you were fowling
they were fowling
Past Perfect
I had fowled
you had fowled
he/she/it had fowled
we had fowled
you had fowled
they had fowled
Future
I will fowl
you will fowl
he/she/it will fowl
we will fowl
you will fowl
they will fowl
Future Perfect
I will have fowled
you will have fowled
he/she/it will have fowled
we will have fowled
you will have fowled
they will have fowled
Future Continuous
I will be fowling
you will be fowling
he/she/it will be fowling
we will be fowling
you will be fowling
they will be fowling
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been fowling
you have been fowling
he/she/it has been fowling
we have been fowling
you have been fowling
they have been fowling
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been fowling
you will have been fowling
he/she/it will have been fowling
we will have been fowling
you will have been fowling
they will have been fowling
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been fowling
you had been fowling
he/she/it had been fowling
we had been fowling
you had been fowling
they had been fowling
Conditional
I would fowl
you would fowl
he/she/it would fowl
we would fowl
you would fowl
they would fowl
Past Conditional
I would have fowled
you would have fowled
he/she/it would have fowled
we would have fowled
you would have fowled
they would have fowled
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.fowl - a domesticated gallinaceous bird thought to be descended from the red jungle fowlfowl - a domesticated gallinaceous bird thought to be descended from the red jungle fowl
gallinacean, gallinaceous bird - heavy-bodied largely ground-feeding domestic or game birds
Dorking - an English breed of large domestic fowl having five toes (the hind toe doubled)
Plymouth Rock - an American breed of domestic fowl
Cornish fowl, Cornish - English breed of compact domestic fowl; raised primarily to crossbreed to produce roasters
Rock Cornish - small plump hybrid developed by crossbreeding Plymouth Rock and Cornish fowl
game fowl - any of several breeds reared for cockfighting
cochin, cochin china - Asian breed of large fowl with dense plumage and feathered legs
genus Gallus, Gallus - common domestic birds and related forms
Gallus gallus, chicken - a domestic fowl bred for flesh or eggs; believed to have been developed from the red jungle fowl
bantam - any of various small breeds of fowl
Meleagris gallopavo, turkey - large gallinaceous bird with fan-shaped tail; widely domesticated for food
guinea fowl, Numida meleagris, guinea - a west African bird having dark plumage mottled with white; native to Africa but raised for food in many parts of the world
saddle - posterior part of the back of a domestic fowl
poultry - flesh of chickens or turkeys or ducks or geese raised for food
2.fowl - the flesh of a bird or fowl (wild or domestic) used as foodfowl - the flesh of a bird or fowl (wild or domestic) used as food
bird - warm-blooded egg-laying vertebrates characterized by feathers and forelimbs modified as wings
wishbone, wishing bone - the furcula of a domestic fowl
poultry - flesh of chickens or turkeys or ducks or geese raised for food
wildfowl - flesh of any of a number of wild game birds suitable for food
drumstick - the lower joint of the leg of a fowl
second joint, thigh - the upper joint of the leg of a fowl
wing - the wing of a fowl; "he preferred the drumsticks to the wings"
giblet, giblets - edible viscera of a fowl
oyster - a small muscle on each side of the back of a fowl
parson's nose, pope's nose - the tail of a dressed fowl
meat - the flesh of animals (including fishes and birds and snails) used as food
dark meat - the flesh of the legs of fowl used as food
Verb1.fowl - hunt fowl
hunt, hunt down, track down, run - pursue for food or sport (as of wild animals); "Goering often hunted wild boars in Poland"; "The dogs are running deer"; "The Duke hunted in these woods"
2.fowl - hunt fowl in the forest
grouse - hunt grouse
hunt, hunt down, track down, run - pursue for food or sport (as of wild animals); "Goering often hunted wild boars in Poland"; "The dogs are running deer"; "The Duke hunted in these woods"

fowl

noun poultry Ducks and many other animals are fowl.
Related words
adjective gallinaceous
male cock
female hen

Types of fowl

American wigeon or baldpate, Ancona chicken, Andalusian chicken, Australorp chicken, bantam chicken, barnacle goose, Bewick's swan, black swan, blue duck, blue goose, Brahma chicken, brush turkey, bufflehead, Campine chicken, Canada goose, canvasback, Cochin chicken, cock or cockerel, Dorking chicken, duck, eider or eider duck, Faverolle chicken, gadwall, goldeneye, goosander, goose, greylag or greylag goose, Hamburg chicken, harlequin duck, hen, Houdan chicken, Leghorn chicken, magpie goose, mallard, mallee fowl or (Austral.) gnow, mandarin duck, marsh hen, megapode, merganser or sawbill, Minorca chicken, moorhen, Muscovy duck or musk duck, mute swan, nene, New Hampshire chicken, Orpington chicken, paradise duck, pintail, Plymouth Rock chicken, pochard, redhead, Rhode Island Red chicken, ruddy duck, scaup or scaup duck, screamer, sea duck, shelduck, shoveler, smew, snow goose, sultan, Sumatra chicken, Sussex chicken, swan, teal, trumpeter swan, turkey, velvet scoter, whistling swan, whooper or whooper swan, wigeon or widgeon, wood duck, Wyandotte chicken
Translations
طَيْر، دجاجَه
drůbež
fjerkræ
baromfimadárszárnyasvíziszárnyas
fugl
naminis paukštis
mājputns
dróbptactwo
kümes hayvanı

fowl

[faʊl]
A. N
1. (= hens etc) (collective n) → aves fpl de corral; (= one bird) → ave f de corral; (served as food) → ave f
2. (archaic) (= bird in general) → ave f
the fowls of the airlas aves
B. CPD fowl pest Npeste f aviar

fowl

[ˈfaʊl] n (= birds) → volaille f

fowl

n
(= poultry)Geflügel nt; (= one bird)Huhn nt/Gans f/Truthahn metc; to keep fowlHühner etc halten; roast fowl (Cook) → Brathuhn nt
the fowls of the air (liter)die Vögel des Himmels
vi (also to go fowling)auf Vogeljagd gehen

fowl

[faʊl] npollame m, volatile m

fowl

(faul) plurals fowl ~fowls noun
a bird, especially domestic, eg hens, ducks, geese etc. He keeps fowls and a few pigs.
References in classic literature ?
The only evil I couldn't prevent was to keep a broiled fowl from drying up.
Ah, but these hens," answered the young man,--"these hens of aristocratic lineage would scorn to understand the vulgar language of a barn-yard fowl.
With the customary infirmity of temper that characterizes this unhappy fowl, she appears by the fierceness of her beak and eye, and the general truculency of her attitude, to threaten mischief to the inoffensive community; and especially to warn all citizens careful of their safety against intruding on the premises which she overshadows with her wings.
And as for going as cook, -- though I confess there is considerable glory in that, a cook being a sort of officer on ship-board --yet, somehow, I never fancied broiling fowls; --though once broiled, judiciously buttered, and judgmatically salted and peppered, there is no one who will speak more respectfully, not to say reverentially, of a broiled fowl than I will.
Not a chicken or turkey or duck in the barn-yard but looked grave when they saw her approaching, and seemed evidently to be reflecting on their latter end; and certain it was that she was always meditating on trussing, stuffing and roasting, to a degree that was calculated to inspire terror in any reflecting fowl living.
This was fortunate, as the chorus of admiration ceased abruptly when the ladies began to eat the fowl.
Not a mouthful of that lovely young fowl and bread sauce did they set a fork into yesterday--and the poor woman fair invented a pudding for them--and back it's sent.
Wragge's anxiety was nothing more important than an old-fashioned Treatise on the Art of Cookery, reduced under the usual heads of Fish, Flesh, and Fowl, and containing the customary series of recipes.
From these decayed sons and daughters of Gaul, she had acquired such wonderful arts, that the woman and girl who formed the staff of domestics regarded her as quite a Sorceress, or Cinderella's Godmother: who would send out for a fowl, a rabbit, a vegetable or two from the garden, and change them into anything she pleased.
If so, it sharpened his appetite; for I distinctly call to mind that, although he had eaten a good deal of pork and greens at dinner, and had finished off with a fowl or two, he was obliged to have cold boiled bacon for tea, and disposed of a large quantity without any emotion.
So in Nicolete's bower it illuminated with strange radiancy the dainty disorder of deserted lunch, made prisms out of the wine-glasses, painted the white cloth with wedge-shaped rainbows, and flooded the cavernous interiors of the half-eaten fowl with a pathetic yellow torchlight.
Of their smaller fowl I could take up twenty or thirty at the end of my knife.