fox


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Fox

 (fŏks)
n. pl. Fox or Fox·es
1. A member of a Native American people formerly inhabiting various parts of southern Michigan, southern Wisconsin, northern Illinois, and eastern Iowa, with present-day populations in central Iowa and with the Sauk in Oklahoma.
2. The Algonquian language of the Fox.

[Translation of French Renards, foxes, perhaps translation of Fox wa·koše·haki, foxes (applied as a name to a clan with the totem of a fox).]

fox

 (fŏks)
n.
1. pl. fox·es also fox
a. Any of various carnivorous mammals of the family Canidae and especially of the genus Vulpes, found worldwide and characteristically having upright ears, a pointed snout, and a long bushy tail.
b. The fur of one of these mammals.
2. A crafty, sly, or clever person.
3. Slang A sexually attractive person.
4. Nautical Small cordage made by twisting together two or more strands of tarred yarn.
5. Archaic A sword.
v. foxed, fox·ing, fox·es
v.tr.
1. To trick or fool by ingenuity or cunning; outwit.
2. To baffle or confuse.
3. To make (beer) sour by fermenting.
4. To repair (a shoe) by attaching a new upper.
5. Obsolete To intoxicate.
v.intr.
1. To act slyly or craftily.
2. To turn sour in fermenting. Used of beer.

[Middle English, from Old English.]

fox

(fɒks)
n, pl foxes or fox
1. (Animals) any canine mammal of the genus Vulpes and related genera. They are mostly predators that do not hunt in packs and typically have large pointed ears, a pointed muzzle, and a bushy tail.
2. (Animals) the fur of any of these animals, usually reddish-brown or grey in colour
3. a person who is cunning and sly
4. slang chiefly US a sexually attractive woman
5. (Bible) Bible
a. a jackal
b. an image of a false prophet
6. (Nautical Terms) nautical small stuff made from yarns twisted together and then tarred
vb
7. (tr) to perplex or confound: to fox a person with a problem.
8. (Printing, Lithography & Bookbinding) to cause (paper, wood, etc) to become discoloured with spots, or (of paper, etc) to become discoloured, as through mildew
9. (tr) to trick; deceive
10. (intr) to act deceitfully or craftily
11. (tr) informal Austral to pursue stealthily; tail
12. (tr) informal Austral to chase and retrieve (a ball)
13. (tr) obsolete to befuddle with alcoholic drink
[Old English; related to Old High German fuhs, Old Norse fōa fox, Sanskrit puccha tail; see vixen]
ˈfoxˌlike adj

Fox

(fɒks)
npl Fox or Foxes
1. (Peoples) a member of a North American Indian people formerly living west of Lake Michigan along the Fox River
2. (Languages) the language of this people, belonging to the Algonquian family

Fox

(fɒks)
n
1. (Biography) Charles James. 1749–1806, British Whig statesman and orator. He opposed North over taxation of the American colonies and Pitt over British intervention against the French Revolution. He advocated parliamentary reform and the abolition of the slave trade
2. (Biography) George. 1624–91, English religious leader; founder (1647) of the Society of Friends (Quakers)
3. (Biography) Terry, full name Terrance Stanley Fox (1958–81). Canadian athlete: he lost a leg to cancer and subsequently attempted a coast-to-coast run across Canada to raise funds for cancer research
4. (Biography) Vicente (Spanish viˈθɛnte). born 1942, Mexican politician; president of Mexico (2000-06)
5. (Biography) Sir William. 1812–93, New Zealand statesman, born in England: prime minister of New Zealand (1856; 1861–62; 1869–72; 1873)

fox

(fɒks)

n., pl. fox•es, (esp. collectively) fox,
n.
1. any of several small carnivores of the dog family, Canidae, esp. those of the genus Vulpes, having a sharply pointed muzzle and a long bushy tail.
2. the fur of this animal.
3. a cunning or crafty person.
4. Slang. a physically attractive young person, esp. a woman.
v.t.
5. to deceive or trick.
6. to repair or trim (a shoe) with leather or other material on the upper front.
7. Obs. to intoxicate or befuddle.
[before 900; Middle English, Old English; c. Old Saxon vohs, Old High German fuhs]
fox′like`, adj.

Fox

(fɒks)
n., pl. Fox•es, (esp. collectively) Fox.
1. a member of an American Indian people residing in Wisconsin at time of first contact, and later confined to a single settlement in E Iowa.
2. the Algonquian language shared by the Fox, Sauk, and Kickapoo.

Fox

(fɒks)

n.
1. Charles James, 1749–1806, British statesman.
2. George, 1624–91, English religious leader: founder of the Society of Friends.
3. Vicente, born 1942, Mexican politician: president of Mexico since 2000.

fox

(fŏks)
Any of various meat-eating mammals related to the dogs and wolves. Foxes usually have upright ears, a pointed snout, and a long bushy tail.

fox


Past participle: foxed
Gerund: foxing

Imperative
fox
fox
Present
I fox
you fox
he/she/it foxes
we fox
you fox
they fox
Preterite
I foxed
you foxed
he/she/it foxed
we foxed
you foxed
they foxed
Present Continuous
I am foxing
you are foxing
he/she/it is foxing
we are foxing
you are foxing
they are foxing
Present Perfect
I have foxed
you have foxed
he/she/it has foxed
we have foxed
you have foxed
they have foxed
Past Continuous
I was foxing
you were foxing
he/she/it was foxing
we were foxing
you were foxing
they were foxing
Past Perfect
I had foxed
you had foxed
he/she/it had foxed
we had foxed
you had foxed
they had foxed
Future
I will fox
you will fox
he/she/it will fox
we will fox
you will fox
they will fox
Future Perfect
I will have foxed
you will have foxed
he/she/it will have foxed
we will have foxed
you will have foxed
they will have foxed
Future Continuous
I will be foxing
you will be foxing
he/she/it will be foxing
we will be foxing
you will be foxing
they will be foxing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been foxing
you have been foxing
he/she/it has been foxing
we have been foxing
you have been foxing
they have been foxing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been foxing
you will have been foxing
he/she/it will have been foxing
we will have been foxing
you will have been foxing
they will have been foxing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been foxing
you had been foxing
he/she/it had been foxing
we had been foxing
you had been foxing
they had been foxing
Conditional
I would fox
you would fox
he/she/it would fox
we would fox
you would fox
they would fox
Past Conditional
I would have foxed
you would have foxed
he/she/it would have foxed
we would have foxed
you would have foxed
they would have foxed
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.fox - alert carnivorous mammal with pointed muzzle and ears and a bushy tailfox - alert carnivorous mammal with pointed muzzle and ears and a bushy tail; most are predators that do not hunt in packs
canid, canine - any of various fissiped mammals with nonretractile claws and typically long muzzles
vixen - a female fox
Reynard - a conventional name for a fox used in tales following usage in the old epic `Reynard the Fox'
Vulpes vulpes, red fox - the common Old World fox; having reddish-brown fur; commonly considered a single circumpolar species
Vulpes fulva, red fox - New World fox; often considered the same species as the Old World fox
prairie fox, Vulpes velox, kit fox - small grey fox of the plains of western North America
kit fox, Vulpes macrotis - small grey fox of southwestern United States; may be a subspecies of Vulpes velox
Alopex lagopus, Arctic fox, white fox - thickly-furred fox of Arctic regions; brownish in summer and white in winter
gray fox, grey fox, Urocyon cinereoargenteus - dark grey American fox; from Central America through southern United States
2.fox - a shifty deceptive personfox - a shifty deceptive person    
beguiler, cheater, deceiver, trickster, slicker, cheat - someone who leads you to believe something that is not true
3.fox - the grey or reddish-brown fur of a fox
fur, pelt - the dressed hairy coat of a mammal
4.fox - English statesman who supported American independence and the French Revolution (1749-1806)Fox - English statesman who supported American independence and the French Revolution (1749-1806)
5.fox - English religious leader who founded the Society of Friends (1624-1691)Fox - English religious leader who founded the Society of Friends (1624-1691)
6.Fox - a member of an Algonquian people formerly living west of Lake Michigan along the Fox River
Algonquian, Algonquin - a member of any of the North American Indian groups speaking an Algonquian language and originally living in the subarctic regions of eastern Canada; many Algonquian tribes migrated south into the woodlands from the Mississippi River to the Atlantic coast
7.Fox - the Algonquian language of the Fox
Algonquian language, Algonquin, Algonquian - family of North American Indian languages spoken from Labrador to South Carolina and west to the Great Plains
Verb1.fox - deceive somebodyfox - deceive somebody; "We tricked the teacher into thinking that class would be cancelled next week"
cozen, deceive, delude, lead on - be false to; be dishonest with
snooker - fool or dupe; "He was snookered by the con-man's smooth talk"
2.fox - be confusing or perplexing tofox - be confusing or perplexing to; cause to be unable to think clearly; "These questions confuse even the experts"; "This question completely threw me"; "This question befuddled even the teacher"
demoralize - confuse or put into disorder; "the boss's behavior demoralized everyone in the office"
bewilder, dumbfound, flummox, baffle, mystify, nonplus, perplex, puzzle, stupefy, amaze, gravel, vex, pose, stick, beat, get - be a mystery or bewildering to; "This beats me!"; "Got me--I don't know the answer!"; "a vexing problem"; "This question really stuck me"
disconcert, flurry, confuse, put off - cause to feel embarrassment; "The constant attention of the young man confused her"
disorient, disorientate - cause to be lost or disoriented
be - have the quality of being; (copula, used with an adjective or a predicate noun); "John is rich"; "This is not a good answer"
3.fox - become discolored with, or as if with, mildew spots
spot - become spotted; "This dress spots quickly"

fox

noun reynard footprints of badgers and foxes
Related words
adjective vulpine
male dog
female vixen
young cub, kit
collective noun skulk
habitation earth
Translations
ثَعْلَبفَرْو الثَّعْلَبيَخْدَع، يَغُش
лисица
liškaoklamatzmástkočkališčí
rævforvirre
vulpo
rebane
روباه
kettukelmi
लोमड़ी
lisica
rókarókaprém
refaskinnrefurtófatófa, refur
キツネ
여우
vulpes
foksterjeraslapėlapėslapinaslapiškas
lapsalapsas-piekrāptpiemānīt
vulpe
líščí
lisica
räv
mbweha
สุนัขจิ้งจอก
tilkitilkiye aitfaka bastırmak
con cáo

fox

[fɒks]
A. N
1. (= dog fox) → zorro m; (= female fox) → zorra f
2. (fig) (= cunning person) → zorro m
he's an old foxes un viejo zorro
B. VT (esp Brit) (= deceive) → engañar; (= puzzle) → dejar perplejo a
this will fox themesto les despistará
you had me completely foxed thereeso me tuvo completamente despistado
C. CPD fox cub Ncachorro m (de zorro)
fox fur Npiel f de zorro
fox terrier Nfoxterrier m, perro m raposero or zorrero

fox

[ˈfɒks]
nrenard m
vtdérouterfox fur nrenard m

fox

n
(lit, fig)Fuchs m; he’s a sly fox (fig)er ist ein schlauer Fuchs
(= fox fur)Fuchs(pelz) m
(dated US inf: = sexy woman) → scharfes Weib (inf)
vt (= deceive)täuschen, reinlegen (inf); (= bewilder)verblüffen; that’s foxed you, hasn’t it?da bist du baff, was? (inf)

fox

:
fox cub
nFuchsjunge(s) nt, → Fuchswelpe m
foxglove
n (Bot) → Fingerhut m
foxhole
n
Fuchsbau m
(Mil) → Schützengraben m, → Schützenloch nt
foxhound
nFuchshund m
fox hunt
nFuchsjagd f
viauf (die) Fuchsjagd gehen
fox-hunting
nFuchsjagd f; to go foxauf die or zur Fuchsjagd gehen
fox terrier
nFoxterrier m
foxtrot
nFoxtrott m

fox

[fɒks]
1. nvolpe f
a sly fox (fig) → una volpe, un furbacchione
2. vt (puzzle) → lasciare perplesso/a, confondere; (deceive) → ingannare

fox

(foks) plural ˈfoxes noun
a type of reddish-brown wild animal which looks like a dog.
adjective
fox-fur.
verb
to puzzle or confuse. She was completely foxed.
ˈfoxy adjective
1. clever in a deceitful way. He's a foxy fellow.
2. like a fox. She had rather foxy features.
ˈfoxhound noun
a kind of dog trained to chase foxes.
fox terrier
a kind of dog formerly trained to drive foxes out of their holes in the ground.

fox

ثَعْلَب liška ræv Fuchs αλεπού zorro kettu renard lisica volpe キツネ 여우 vos rev lis raposa лиса räv สุนัขจิ้งจอก tilki con cáo 狐狸
References in classic literature ?
An impromptu circus, fox and geese, and an amicable game of croquet finished the afternoon.
The young hounds go laughing and singing too much already through the woods, when they ought not to breathe louder than a fox in his cover.
A fox, startled from his sleep by her light footstep on the leaves, looked inquisitively at Pearl, as doubting whether it were better to steal off, or renew his nap on the same spot.
Well, no," she said, "you must not say that; but though I am an old horse, and have seen and heard a great deal, I never yet could make out why men are so fond of this sport; they often hurt themselves, often spoil good horses, and tear up the fields, and all for a hare or a fox, or a stag, that they could get more easily some other way; but we are only horses, and don't know.
I can easily walk ten, fifteen, twenty, any number of miles, commencing at my own door, without going by any house, without crossing a road except where the fox and the mink do: first along by the river, and then the brook, and then the meadow and the woodside.
When Professor Marsh was out here hunting bones for the chapel of Yale University he found skeletons of horses no bigger than a fox, bedded in the rocks, and he said they were ancestors of my father.
She returned just in time to join the others as they quitted the house, on an excursion through its more immediate premises; and the rest of the morning was easily whiled away, in lounging round the kitchen garden, examining the bloom upon its walls, and listening to the gardener's lamentations upon blights, in dawdling through the green-house, where the loss of her favourite plants, unwarily exposed, and nipped by the lingering frost, raised the laughter of Charlotte,--and in visiting her poultry-yard, where, in the disappointed hopes of her dairy-maid, by hens forsaking their nests, or being stolen by a fox, or in the rapid decrease of a promising young brood, she found fresh sources of merriment.
It shows you are a cunning little fox, and nobody will put faith in you any more.
He once found a little fox cub half drowned in its hole and he brought it home in th' bosom of his shirt to keep it warm.
When exceptional circumstances compel me to take an opposite course, there isn't a slyer fox alive than I am.
The red fox made him say all this, I knew, to exhibit him to me in the light he had indicated on the night when he poisoned my rest.
Let us out, you old fox, or I'll get him to bring an action against you for false imprisonment.