foxglove


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fox·glove

 (fŏks′glŭv′)
n.
Any of several herbs of the genus Digitalis, especially D. purpurea of Europe and northern Africa, having a long cluster of large, tubular, pinkish-purple flowers and leaves that are the source of the drug digitalis. Also called digitalis.

[From the resemblance of its flowers to the fingers of a glove.]

foxglove

(ˈfɒksˌɡlʌv)
n
(Plants) any Eurasian scrophulariaceous plant of the genus Digitalis, esp D. purpurea, having spikes of purple or white thimble-like flowers. The soft wrinkled leaves are a source of digitalis
[Old English]

fox•glove

(ˈfɒksˌglʌv)

n.
a common plant, Digitalis purpurea, of the figwort family, with purple flowers on a tall spike: the leaves yield digitalis.
[before 1000]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.foxglove - any of several plants of the genus Digitalisfoxglove - any of several plants of the genus Digitalis
herb, herbaceous plant - a plant lacking a permanent woody stem; many are flowering garden plants or potherbs; some having medicinal properties; some are pests
genus Digitalis - genus of Eurasian herbs having alternate leaves and racemes of showy bell-shaped flowers
common foxglove, Digitalis purpurea, fairy bell, fingerflower, finger-flower, fingerroot, finger-root - tall leafy European biennial or perennial having spectacular clusters of large tubular pink-purple flowers; leaves yield drug digitalis and are poisonous to livestock
Digitalis lutea, straw foxglove, yellow foxglove - European yellow-flowered foxglove
Translations
sormustinkukka
revebjelle
naparstnica

foxglove

[ˈfɒksglʌv] Ndedalera f

foxglove

[ˈfɒksglʌv] ndigitale f

foxglove

[ˈfɒksˌglʌv] n (Bot) → digitale f

fox·glove

n. dedalera, nombre común de Digitalis purpurea.
References in classic literature ?
The low wall was one of the prettiest things in Yorkshire because he had tucked moorland foxglove and ferns and rock-cress and hedgerow flowers into every crevice until only here and there glimpses of the stones were to be seen.
He had inherited from his mother some acquaintance with medicinal herbs and their preparation--a little store of wisdom which she had imparted to him as a solemn bequest--but of late years he had had doubts about the lawfulness of applying this knowledge, believing that herbs could have no efficacy without prayer, and that prayer might suffice without herbs; so that the inherited delight he had in wandering in the fields in search of foxglove and dandelion and coltsfoot, began to wear to him the character of a temptation.
Standing on one side of the stage, and partly overshadowing it, was a tall foxglove, which seemed, as the evening breeze gently swayed it hither and thither, to offer exactly the sort of accommodation that the orator desired.
Down the wilder shrubbery walks foxgloves and mulleins will (I hope) shine majestic; and one cool corner, backed by a group of firs, is graced by Madonna lilies, white foxgloves, and columbines.
Some, such as the common foxglove, may seem innocuous while others, like Atropa belladonna (deadly nightshade), always come with a skull and crossbone warning.
Toxic plants: Asiatic lily, asparagus fern, begonia, box, calla lily, cherry laurel, clematis, cordyline, chrysanthemum, daisy, daffodil bulbs, dahlia, delphinium, elderberry, eucalyptus, flax, foxglove, geranium, grape plant, green seed potatoes, hydrangea, ivy, lobelia, lupin, marigold, nerium oleander, peony, plantain lily, poppy, privet hedge, tomato plant, verbena, wisteria, yew tree.
Foxglove digitalis purpurea, (Bysedd y Cwn in Welsh, which translates as Dog Fingers) is native to the British Isles and grows in the open on disturbed soils.
THE staple of any cottage garden is the common foxglove - stately spires of purple or white tubular blooms.
He created it by crossing two distant foxglove cousins and selecting the best of countless hybrids.
15) blew the start and still won a fair opening sprint maiden EYECATCHER Fairy Foxglove (7.
What is the flower spike on such plants as foxglove known as?
I know of a European biologist, well trained, who ate a salad of comfrey that contained a few leaves of self-seeded foxglove that was mixed in with the patch of comfrey.