frail


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Related to frail: frail elderly

frail 1

 (frāl)
adj. frail·er, frail·est
1. Physically weak or delicate: an invalid's frail body; in frail health. See Synonyms at weak.
2. Easily broken or destroyed; fragile: a flower with a frail stem.
3. Not strong or substantial; slight: a frail voice; evidence too frail to stand up in court.
4. Easily led astray; morally weak.

[Middle English frele, from Old French, from Latin fragilis, from frangere, frag-, to break; see bhreg- in Indo-European roots.]

frail′ly adv.
frail′ness n.

frail 2

 (frāl)
n.
1. A rush basket for holding fruit, especially dried fruit.
2. The quantity of fruit, such as raisins or figs, that such a basket can hold.

[Middle English fraiel, from Old French.]

frail

(freɪl)
adj
1. physically weak and delicate
2. fragile: a frail craft.
3. easily corrupted or tempted
[C13: from Old French frele, from Latin fragilis, fragile]
ˈfrailly adv
ˈfrailness n

frail

(freɪl)
n
1. a rush basket for figs or raisins
2. (Units) a quantity of raisins or figs equal to between 50 and 75 pounds
[C13: from Old French fraiel, of uncertain origin]

frail1

(freɪl)

adj. , -er, -est.
1. having delicate health.
2. easily broken or destroyed.
3. morally weak.
[1300–50; Middle English < Old French < Latin fragilis fragile]
frail′ly, adv.
frail′ness, n.
syn: frail, brittle, fragile imply a delicacy or weakness of substance or construction. frail applies particularly to health and immaterial things: a frail constitution; frail hopes. brittle implies a hard material that snaps or breaks to pieces easily: brittle as glass. fragile implies that the object must be handled carefully to avoid breakage or damage: fragile bric-a-brac.

frail2

(freɪl)

n.
a basket made of rushes and used esp. for dried fruits.
[1300–50; Middle English frayel, fraelle < Old French frayel, of uncertain orig.]

frail

- Fifty pounds of raisins.
See also related terms for raisin.

Frail

 a rush basket, hence, the quantity it could contain, ranging from 30 to 76 Ibs.
Examples: frail of currants, 1836; of figs, 1382; of raisins, 1420; of sprats, 1618.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.frail - the weight of a frail (basket) full of raisins or figs; between 50 and 75 pounds
weight unit, weight - a unit used to measure weight; "he placed two weights in the scale pan"
2.frail - a basket for holding dried fruit (especially raisins or figs)
basket, handbasket - a container that is usually woven and has handles
Adj.1.frail - physically weak; "an invalid's frail body"
delicate - exquisitely fine and subtle and pleasing; susceptible to injury; "a delicate violin passage"; "delicate china"; "a delicate flavor"; "the delicate wing of a butterfly"
weak - wanting in physical strength; "a weak pillar"
robust - sturdy and strong in form, constitution, or construction; "a robust body"; "a robust perennial"
2.frail - wanting in moral strength, courage, or will; having the attributes of man as opposed to e.g. divine beings; "I'm only a fallible human"; "frail humanity"
human - having human form or attributes as opposed to those of animals or divine beings; "human beings"; "the human body"; "human kindness"; "human frailty"
3.frail - easily broken or damaged or destroyed; "a kite too delicate to fly safely"; "fragile porcelain plates"; "fragile old bones"; "a frail craft"
breakable - capable of being broken or damaged; "earthenware pottery is breakable"; "breakable articles should be packed carefully"

frail

adjective
1. feeble, weak, puny, decrepit, infirm She lay in bed looking particularly frail.
feeble strong, sound, tough, healthy, substantial, robust, vigorous, sturdy, hale, stalwart
2. flimsy, weak, vulnerable, delicate, fragile, brittle, unsound, wispy, insubstantial, breakable, frangible, slight The frail craft rocked as he clambered in.

frail

adjective
Translations
ضَعيف، واهِنواهٍ
slabýchatrného zdraví
skrøbeligsvagelig
heikko
krhak
gyenge egészségû
veikburîa
かよわい
허약한
trauslsvārs
slaboten
bräcklig
แบบบาง
yếu ớt

frail

[freɪl] ADJ (frailer (compar) (frailest (superl))) [person] → débil; [health] → delicado, frágil; [chair etc] → frágil (fig) [hope] → leve; [relationship] → frágil

frail

[ˈfreɪl] adj
[old person] → frêle
[thing] → fragile

frail

adj (+er)
(= weak) persongebrechlich; healthzart, anfällig; to be in frail healthkränklich sein, gesundheitlich angeschlagen sein; to look frailschwach aussehen
(= fragile) structurefragil; boat, aircraftleicht gebaut; (fig) hopeschwach; egolabil; happiness is a frail commodityGlück ist eine unsichere Angelegenheit

frail

[freɪl] adj (-er (comp) (-est (superl))) (person, health, structure) → fragile, delicato/a (fig) (hope, relationship) → tenue, debole

frail

(freil) adjective
weak, especially in health. a frail old lady.
ˈfrailtyplural ˈfrailties noun
physical weakness or (a) moral failing. She loved him in spite of his frailties.

frail

واهٍ slabý skrøbelig schwach ευπαθής débil heikko frêle krhak fragile かよわい 허약한 zwak skjør kruchy frágil хилый bräcklig แบบบาง hastalıklı yếu ớt 虚弱的

frail

adj frágil, débil
References in classic literature ?
It was no paler and but littler thinner than in the autumn, yet there was a strange, transparent look about it, as if the mortal was being slowly refined away, and the immortal shining through the frail flesh with an indescribably pathetic beauty.
One son, Fuchs said, was well-grown, and strong enough to work the land; but the father was old and frail and knew nothing about farming.
So soon as Cora and Alice were seated, the scout, without regarding the element, directed Heyward to support one side of the frail vessel, and posting himself at the other, they bore it up against the stream, followed by the dejected owner of the dead foal.
In the way of furniture, there were two tables: one, constructed with perplexing intricacy and exhibiting as many feet as a centipede; the other, most delicately wrought, with four long and slender legs, so apparently frail that it was almost incredible what a length of time the ancient tea-table had stood upon them.
As now he thus vainly strove, the jaw slipped from him; the frail gunwales bent in, collapsed, and snapped, as both jaws, like an enormous shears, sliding further aft, bit the craft completely in twain, and locked themselves fast again in the sea, midway between the two floating wrecks.
Everybody laughed at them, for Tamoszius was petite and frail, and Marija could have picked him up and carried him off under one arm.
The general prevalence of agricultural pursuits of a quiet and gradual nature, not requiring those periodic seasons of hurry and pressure that are called for in the business of more southern districts, makes the task of the negro a more healthful and reasonable one; while the master, content with a more gradual style of acquisition, has not those temptations to hardheartedness which always overcome frail human nature when the prospect of sudden and rapid gain is weighed in the balance, with no heavier counterpoise than the interests of the helpless and unprotected.
It is as I told you in my other letter: both my poor sister and her husband, when they found they could not recover, expressed the wish that you should have their little Catherine - as knowing that you would presently be retired from the army - rather than that she should remain with me, who am broken in health, or go to your mother in California, whose health is also frail.
By this time the sea was running inches high, and threatening every moment to engulf the frail bark.
At last Becky's frail limbs refused to carry her farther.
Burch was a slim, frail little woman with dark hair, a broad low forehead, and patient mouth.
When once I had pressed the frail shoulder, something new--a fresh sap and sense--stole into my frame.