franc


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Related to franc: Franc Tireur

franc

 (frăngk)
n. Abbr. F or fr.
1. See Table at currency.
2. The primary unit of currency in Belgium, France, Luxembourg, and Monaco before the adoption of the euro.

[Middle English frank, French gold coin, from Old French franc, from Medieval Latin Francōrum (rēx), (king) of the Franks (from the legend on the first of these coins), genitive pl. of Francus, Frank; see Frank.]

franc

(fræŋk; French frɑ̃)
n
1. (Currencies) Also called: French franc the former standard monetary unit of France, most French dependencies, Andorra, and Monaco, divided into 100 centimes; replaced by the euro in 2002
2. (Currencies) the former standard monetary unit of Belgium (Belgian franc) and Luxembourg (Luxembourg franc), divided into 100 centimes; replaced by the euro in 2002
3. (Currencies) Also called: Swiss franc the standard monetary unit of Switzerland and Liechtenstein, divided into 100 centimes
4. (Currencies) Also called: franc CFA, CFA franc or franc of the African financial community the standard monetary unit, comprising 100 centimes, of the following countries: Benin, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, the Central African Republic, Chad, Congo-Brazzaville, Côte d'Ivoire, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, Guinea-Bissau, Mali, Niger, Senegal, and Togo
5. (Currencies) the standard monetary unit of Burundi (Burundi franc), Comoros (Comorian franc), Democratic Republic of Congo (Congolese franc), Djibouti (Djibouti franc), Guinea (Guinea franc), Madagascar (franc malgache), Rwanda (Rwanda franc), and French Polynesia and New Caledonia (French Pacific franc)

franc

(fræŋk)

n.
1. the basic currency of France, Belgium, and Luxembourg, which has a fixed value relative to the euro.
2. the basic monetary unit of Burundi, Djibouti, Guinea, Madagascar, Rwanda, and Switzerland.
3. a former silver coin of France, first issued under Henry III.
[1350–1400; Middle English frank < Old French franc < Medieval Latin Rēx Francōrum King of the Franks (orig. inscription on the coin)]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.franc - the basic monetary unit in many countriesfranc - the basic monetary unit in many countries; equal to 100 centimes
monetary unit - a unit of money
centime - a fractional monetary unit of several countries: France and Algeria and Belgium and Burkina Faso and Burundi and Cameroon and Chad and the Congo and Gabon and Haiti and the Ivory Coast and Luxembourg and Mali and Morocco and Niger and Rwanda and Senegal and Switzerland and Togo
Belgian franc - formerly the basic unit of money in Belgium
Benin franc - the basic unit of money in Benin
Burundi franc - the basic unit of money in Burundi
Cameroon franc - the basic unit of money in Cameroon
Central African Republic franc - the basic unit of money in the Central African Republic
Chadian franc - the basic unit of money in Chad
Congo franc - the basic unit of money in the Congo
Djibouti franc - the basic unit of money in Djibouti
French franc - formerly the basic unit of money in France
Gabon franc - the basic unit of money in Gabon
Cote d'Ivoire franc, Ivory Coast franc - the basic unit of money in the Ivory Coast
Luxembourg franc - formerly the basic unit of money in Luxembourg
Madagascar franc - the basic unit of money in Madagascar
Mali franc - the basic unit of money in Mali
Niger franc - the basic unit of money in Niger
Rwanda franc - the basic unit of money in Rwanda
Senegalese franc - the basic unit of money in Senegal
Swiss franc - the basic unit of money in Switzerland
Togo franc - the basic unit of money in Togo
Burkina Faso franc - the basic unit of money in Burkina Faso
Guinean franc - the basic unit of money in Guinea
Translations
فْرَنْك
frank
franc
frangi
frank
franki
frankas
franks
frank
frank

franc

[fræŋk] Nfranco m

franc

[ˈfræŋk] nfranc m

franc

nFranc m

franc

[fræŋk] nfranco

franc

(frӕŋk) noun
the standard unit of currency in France, Belgium, Switzerland and several other countries, eg in some parts of Africa where French is spoken.
References in classic literature ?
All summer long the tourists flock to that church about six o'clock in the evening, and pay their franc, and listen to the noise.
It is worth another franc, mademoiselle," she said, "to cut a handkerchief from the CENTRE of the piece.
Just as I was opening the outer door, I remembered the twenty francs which I had not restored; I paused: impossible to carry them away with me; difficult to force them back on their original owner; I had now seen her in her own humble abode, witnessed the dignity of her poverty, the pride of order, the fastidious care of conservatism, obvious in the arrangement and economy of her little home; I was sure she would not suffer herself to be excused paying her debts; I was certain the favour of indemnity would be accepted from no hand, perhaps least of all from mine: yet these four five-franc pieces were a burden to my self-respect, and I must get rid of them.
Business transactions with that useful institution had always been conducted by her, it being Mr Warden's theory that Woman can extract in these crises just that extra franc or two which is denied to the mere male.
When we arrived at the garden in Asnieres, we paid a franc or two admission and entered a place which had flower beds in it, and grass plots, and long, curving rows of ornamental shrubbery, with here and there a secluded bower convenient for eating ice cream in.
For a franc, they got an egg, a plate of meat, cheese, and a small bottle of wine.
A rather good-looking Ouled-Nail was dancing, and, perceiving Tarzan's European clothes, and scenting a generous gratuity, she threw her silken handkerchief upon his shoulder, to be rewarded with a franc.
I gave her a spray of lilac, I remember, and you gave her a franc.
I receive my salary regularly at the end of each month--not a franc extra, though I have done many things which are not part of a courier's proper work.
Not another word shall I speak," said Aylward; "but here is a franc for thee and I crave thy blessing.
The reader must know that the ghost had calmly been paid his first twenty thousand francs.
Madame Lardot leased to the chevalier two rooms on the second floor of her house, for the modest sum of one hundred francs a year.