franchising


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fran·chise

 (frăn′chīz′)
n.
1. A privilege or right granted by law, especially the right to vote in the election of public officials.
2. A special privilege given by government to a corporation or an individual to engage in a particular activity using public facilities, especially to provide a public service such as transportation or communications.
3. The establishment of a corporation, including the granting of certain privileges such as exemption from individual liability for the acts of the corporation.
4.
a. Authorization granted to someone to sell or distribute a company's goods or services in a certain area.
b. A business or group of businesses established or operated under such authorization.
c. A brand name under which a series of products is released.
5. The territory or limits within which immunity, a privilege, or a right may be exercised.
6. A professional sports team.
tr.v. fran·chised, fran·chis·ing, fran·chis·es
To grant a franchise to.

[Middle English fraunchise, from Old French franchise, from franche, feminine of franc, free, exempt; see frank1.]
Translations
franchising

franchising

[ˈfræntʃaɪzɪŋ] Nfranquiciamiento m
References in periodicals archive ?
The Nemos Seafood owners are discovering that franchising their business has tremendous advantages, from expanding with minimal capital investment--since franchisees provide the initial investment--to competing more effectively against much larger competitors.
Once a Latin American franchising industry leader, the company reported a loss in the fourth quarter of 2002--the first in the company's history--and began shutting some of its glass double doors after approximately US$67.
FRANCHISING DREAMS: The Lure of Entrepreneurship in America by Peter Birkeland University of Chicago Press, $22.
We also consider the number of years in business, the length of time franchising, start-up costs, litigation, percentage of terminations and whether the company provides financing.
Franchise Update Online also has a paid directory of franchise attorneys, a National Franchise Resale Network, a library of articles about franchising, and the opportunity to order print publications.
Thousands of other women have followed Shaw into the franchising world, which now has a workforce of more than 8 million people.
These franchisors, such as Holiday Inns, Midas Mufflers and H&R Block, expanded the concept of franchising to include not only the rights to operate under a well-known trademark, but to provide their franchisees with a complete system of doing business.
Sagittarius Restaurants LLC has announced a reorganization of its franchising department.
When the International Franchise Association created the Women's Franchise Committee (WFC) in 1996 the number of women-owned businesses was on the rise and many of those entrepreneurs were taking an interest in franchising.
The fad has even spawned its own service industry: Business schools offer courses in franchising, attorneys specialize in franchise law, banks advertise special financing plans and consultants are putting on franchise trade fairs.
Other rating factors include number of years in business, length of time franchising, start-up costs, litigation, percentage of terminations and whether the company provides financing.