frank


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Frank

 (frăngk)
n.
A member of one of the Germanic tribes of the Rhine region in the early Christian era, especially one of the Salian Franks who conquered Gaul about ad 500 and established an extensive empire that reached its greatest power in the ninth century.

[Middle English, from Old English Franca and Old French Franc, both from Late Latin Francus, of Germanic origin.]

frank 1

 (frăngk)
adj. frank·er, frank·est
1. Open and sincere in expression; straightforward: made several frank remarks about the quality of their work.
2. Clearly manifest; evident: frank enjoyment.
tr.v. franked, frank·ing, franks
1.
a. To put an official mark on (a piece of mail) so that it can be sent free of charge.
b. To send (mail) free of charge.
2. To place a stamp or mark on (a piece of mail) to show the payment of postage.
3. To enable (a person) to come and go freely.
n.
1.
a. A mark or signature placed on a piece of mail to indicate the right to send it free of charge.
b. The right to send mail free.
2. A franked piece of mail.

[Middle English, free, from Old French franc, from Late Latin Francus, Frank; see Frank.]

frank′ness n.
Synonyms: frank1, candid, forthright, outspoken, straightforward, open
These adjectives mean revealing or disposed to reveal one's thoughts freely and honestly. Frank implies directness, sometimes to the point of bluntness: "And yes, to be frank, the singing was atrocious" (Eileen Pollack).
Candid and forthright often suggest refusal to evade difficult or unpleasant issues: "Save, save, oh save me from the candid friend!" (George Canning)."He wanted his countrymen to know the truth, and he was forthright about the challenges they faced" (Sean Hannity).
Outspoken usually implies bold lack of reserve: "She is outspoken to the point of never holding back, on politics or much else" (Joseph Epstein).
Straightforward denotes directness of manner and expression: "George was a straightforward soul....'See here!' he said. 'Are you engaged to anybody?'" (Booth Tarkington).
Open suggests freedom from all trace of reserve or secretiveness: "I will be open and sincere with you" (Joseph Addison).

frank 2

 (frăngk)
n. Informal
A frankfurter.

Frank

(fræŋk)
n
(Historical Terms) a member of a group of West Germanic peoples who spread from the east bank of the middle Rhine into the Roman Empire in the late 4th century ad, gradually conquering most of Gaul and Germany. The Franks achieved their greatest power under Charlemagne
[Old English Franca; related to Old High German Franko; perhaps from the name of a typical Frankish weapon (compare Old English franca javelin)]

Frank

(fræŋk)
n
(Historical Terms) a member of a group of West Germanic peoples who spread from the east bank of the middle Rhine into the Roman Empire in the late 4th century ad, gradually conquering most of Gaul and Germany. The Franks achieved their greatest power under Charlemagne
[Old English Franca; related to Old High German Franko; perhaps from the name of a typical Frankish weapon (compare Old English franca javelin)]

Frank

(Dutch fraŋk)
n
1. (Biography) Anne. 1929–45, German Jewess, whose Diary (1947) recorded the experiences of her family while in hiding from the Nazis in Amsterdam (1942–44). They were betrayed and she died in a concentration camp
2. (Biography) Robert. born 1924, US photographer and film maker, born in Switzerland; best known for his photographic book The Americans (1959)

frank1

(fræŋk)

adj. , frank•er, frank•est,
adj.
1. direct and unreserved in speech: frank criticism.
2. lacking inhibition or subterfuge: frank curiosity.
3. unmistakable; clinically evident: frank blood.
n.
4. a stamp, printed marking, or signature on a piece of mail indicating that postal charges have been paid.
v.t.
5. to mark (mail) for transmission by virtue of a frank.
6. to enable to pass or go freely.
7. to facilitate the comings and goings of (a person).
[1250–1300; Middle English < Old French franc < Late Latin francus free, orig. Frank1]
frank′a•ble, adj.
frank′er, n.
syn: frank, candid, open, outspoken imply a freedom and boldness in speaking. frank implies a straightforward, almost tactless expression of one's real opinions or sentiments: He was frank in his rejection of the proposal. candid suggests sincerity, truthfulness, and impartiality: a candid appraisal of her work. open implies a lack of reserve or of concealment: open antagonism. outspoken suggests free and bold expression, even when inappropriate: an outspoken and unnecessary show of disapproval.

frank2

(fræŋk)

n.
a frankfurter.
[1900–05, Amer.; by shortening]

Frank

(fræŋk)

n.
1. a member of a confederation of Germanic peoples living on the right bank of the lower Rhine in the 3rd century a.d. and by the 6th century ruling most of what is now France, the Low Countries, and W Germany.
2. an inhabitant of the early medieval polities founded by the Franks.
3. (now in historical contexts) any native of W Europe.
[before 900; Middle English; Old English Franca]

Frank

(fræŋk, frɑŋk)

n.
Anne, 1929–45, German Jewish girl who died in Belsen concentration camp in Germany: her diaries about her family hiding from Nazis in Amsterdam (1942–44) published in 1947.

frank


Past participle: franked
Gerund: franking

Imperative
frank
frank
Present
I frank
you frank
he/she/it franks
we frank
you frank
they frank
Preterite
I franked
you franked
he/she/it franked
we franked
you franked
they franked
Present Continuous
I am franking
you are franking
he/she/it is franking
we are franking
you are franking
they are franking
Present Perfect
I have franked
you have franked
he/she/it has franked
we have franked
you have franked
they have franked
Past Continuous
I was franking
you were franking
he/she/it was franking
we were franking
you were franking
they were franking
Past Perfect
I had franked
you had franked
he/she/it had franked
we had franked
you had franked
they had franked
Future
I will frank
you will frank
he/she/it will frank
we will frank
you will frank
they will frank
Future Perfect
I will have franked
you will have franked
he/she/it will have franked
we will have franked
you will have franked
they will have franked
Future Continuous
I will be franking
you will be franking
he/she/it will be franking
we will be franking
you will be franking
they will be franking
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been franking
you have been franking
he/she/it has been franking
we have been franking
you have been franking
they have been franking
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been franking
you will have been franking
he/she/it will have been franking
we will have been franking
you will have been franking
they will have been franking
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been franking
you had been franking
he/she/it had been franking
we had been franking
you had been franking
they had been franking
Conditional
I would frank
you would frank
he/she/it would frank
we would frank
you would frank
they would frank
Past Conditional
I would have franked
you would have franked
he/she/it would have franked
we would have franked
you would have franked
they would have franked
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Frank - a member of the ancient Germanic peoples who spread from the Rhine into the Roman Empire in the 4th century
European - a native or inhabitant of Europe
Salian, Salian Frank - a member of the tribe of Franks who settled in the Netherlands in the 4th century AD
2.frank - a smooth-textured sausage of minced beef or pork usually smokedfrank - a smooth-textured sausage of minced beef or pork usually smoked; often served on a bread roll
sausage - highly seasoned minced meat stuffed in casings
Vienna sausage - short slender frankfurter usually with ends cut off
red hot, hot dog, hotdog - a frankfurter served hot on a bun
Verb1.frank - stamp with a postmark to indicate date and time of mailing
stamp - to mark, or produce an imprint in or on something; "a man whose name is permanently stamped on our maps"
2.frank - exempt by means of an official pass or letter, as from customs or other checks
let off, excuse, exempt, relieve - grant exemption or release to; "Please excuse me from this class"
Adj.1.frank - characterized by directness in manner or speech; without subtlety or evasion; "blunt talking and straight shooting"; "a blunt New England farmer"; "I gave them my candid opinion"; "forthright criticism"; "a forthright approach to the problem"; "tell me what you think--and you may just as well be frank"; "it is possible to be outspoken without being rude"; "plainspoken and to the point"; "a point-blank accusation"
direct - straightforward in means or manner or behavior or language or action; "a direct question"; "a direct response"; "a direct approach"
2.frank - clearly manifest; evident; "frank enjoyment"
obvious - easily perceived by the senses or grasped by the mind; "obvious errors"

frank

verb
1. postmark, mark, stamp The letter was franked in London.

frank

adjective
Translations
искрен
upřímnýfrankovat
åbenhjertigfrankere
bérmentesítnyiltőszinte
hreinskilinn
frankuoti
apzīmogotatklātsvaļsirdīgs
ofrankovať
odkritosrčen
damgalamakdürüstsamimî

Frank

1 [fræŋk] N (Hist) → franco/a m/f

frank

1 [fræŋk] ADJ (franker (compar) (frankest (superl))) → franco
to be frank (with you)para serte franco, sinceramente

frank

2 [fræŋk] VT [+ letter] → franquear

frank

[ˈfræŋk]
adj
[person] → franc(franche)
to be frank → pour être franc, franchement
[discussion, assessment] → franc(franche)
vt [+ letter] → affranchir

Frank

n (Hist) → Franke m, → Fränkin f

frank

1
adj (+er) personoffen; opinion alsoehrlich; comment, discussion alsofreimütig; to be frank with somebodyehrlich or offen mit or zu jdm sein; he wasn’t very frank about iter äußerte sich nicht sehr offen dazu; to be (perfectly) frank (with you)um (ganz) ehrlich zu sein

frank

2
vt letterfrankieren; (= postmark) letterstempeln

frank

1 [fræŋk] adj (-er (comp) (-est (superl))) → franco/a, sincero/a, aperto/a

frank

2 [fræŋk] vt (letter) → affrancare

frank

(frӕŋk) adjective
saying or showing openly what is in one's mind; honest. a frank person; a frank reply.
verb
to mark a letter by machine to show that postage has been paid.
ˈfrankly adverb

frank

a. obvio-a, rel. a una condición fisica presente.
References in classic literature ?
she had been so simply taught that there was no nonsense in her head, and at fifteen she was as innocent and frank as any child.
It was impossible not to admire his frank, manly faith.
Pontellier's club, and she was frank enough to tell Edna so.
The crown of France shall never degrade the lance to the distaff'," said Montcalm, dryly, and with a little hauteur; but instantly adding, with his former frank and easy air: "as all the nobler qualities are hereditary, I can easily credit you; though, as I said before, courage has its limits, and humanity must not be forgotten.
said Jessie, with an alarming frank laugh of relief, that was, however, as frankly reflected in the boyishly appreciative eyes of the young men.
Nevertheless, whether or no it were entirely owing to the inauspicious commencement of their acquaintance, she still acted under a certain reserve, which was by no means customary to her frank and genial nature.
Thou knowest," said Hester -- for, depressed as she was, she could not endure this last quiet stab at the token of her shame -- "thou knowest that I was frank with thee.
In spite of this timidity-- which the child herself, in the oddest way in the world, had been perfectly frank and brave about, allowing it, without a sign of uncomfortable consciousness, with the deep, sweet serenity indeed of one of Raphael's holy infants, to be discussed, to be imputed to her, and to determine us-- I feel quite sure she would presently like me.
He therefore held his peace on that head, but otherwise was quite frank and confidential with him, so that the two quickly concocted a little plan for both circumventing and satirizing the Captain, without his at all dreaming of distrusting their sincerity.
The boy was twelve years old, a tall, frank, good-tempered lad; and little Dorothy (Dolly they called her) was her mother over again, at eight years old.
he said, in the fulness of his heart, as the frank, boyish face was lost to his view.
The traveler Burton says of it--"Your MORALE improves; you become frank and cordial, hospitable and single-minded.