frankincense


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Related to frankincense: frankincense oil

frank·in·cense

 (frăng′kĭn-sĕns′)
n.
An aromatic gum resin obtained from African and Asian trees of the genus Boswellia, used as incense and in perfumes.

[Middle English frank encens, from Old French franc encens : franc, free, pure; see frank1 + encens, incense; see incense2.]

frankincense

(ˈfræŋkɪnˌsɛns)
n
(Elements & Compounds) an aromatic gum resin obtained from trees of the burseraceous genus Boswellia, which occur in Asia and Africa. Also called: olibanum
[C14: from Old French franc free, pure + encens incense1; see frank]

frank•in•cense

(ˈfræŋ kɪnˌsɛns)

n.
an aromatic gum resin from various Asian and African trees of the genus Boswellia, bursera family, used chiefly as an incense and in perfumery.
[1350–1400; Middle English]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.frankincense - an aromatic gum resin obtained from various Arabian or East African treesfrankincense - an aromatic gum resin obtained from various Arabian or East African trees; formerly valued for worship and for embalming and fumigation
gum - any of various substances (soluble in water) that exude from certain plants; they are gelatinous when moist but harden on drying
Translations

frankincense

[ˈfræŋkɪnsens] Nincienso m

frankincense

[ˈfræŋkɪnsɛns] nencens m

frankincense

nWeihrauch m

frankincense

[ˈfræŋkɪŋˌsɛns] nincenso
References in classic literature ?
The Turks use it in cooking, and also carry it to Mecca, for the same purpose that frankincense is carried to St.
He saw that there was no mood of the mind that had not its counterpart in the sensuous life, and set himself to discover their true relations, wondering what there was in frankincense that made one mystical, and in ambergris that stirred one's passions, and in violets that woke the memory of dead romances, and in musk that troubled the brain, and in champak that stained the imagination; and seeking often to elaborate a real psychology of perfumes, and to estimate the several influences of sweet-smelling roots and scented, pollen-laden flowers; of aromatic balms and of dark and fragrant woods; of spikenard, that sickens; of hovenia, that makes men mad; and of aloes, that are said to be able to expel melancholy from the soul.
Now, therefore, I say battle with your pride and beat it; cherish not your anger for ever; the might and majesty of heaven are more than ours, but even heaven may be appeased; and if a man has sinned he prays the gods, and reconciles them to himself by his piteous cries and by frankincense, with drink-offerings and the savour of burnt sacrifice.
makes itself a nest of frankincense, and myrrh, and other spices,
His relation to men is angelic; his memory is myrrh to them; his presence, frankincense and flowers.
His lips are sweet as honey, and his breath is like frankincense.
A CROW caught in a snare prayed to Apollo to release him, making a vow to offer some frankincense at his shrine.
The words which express our faith and piety are not definite; yet they are significant and fragrant like frankincense to superior natures.
involved himself in a discursive address from Mrs Sprodgkin, revolving around the result that she regarded tea and sugar in the light of myrrh and frankincense, and considered bread and butter identical with locusts and wild honey.
Our models show that within 50 years populations of Boswellia will be decimated, and the declining populations mean frankincense production is doomed.
Frankincense and More: The Biography of Barry Hills By Robin Oakley Published by the Racing Post pounds 12.
WATCHDOG BBC1 8pm This new series sees Anne Robinson (above) return to host an extended version of the consumer investigation show, alongside Matt Allwright and Anita Rani THE FRANKINCENSE TRAIL BBC2 8pm Kate Humble (above) crosses the Red Sea to Egypt as she follows the frankincense trade route of the Pharaohs.