frankness


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frank 1

 (frăngk)
adj. frank·er, frank·est
1. Open and sincere in expression; straightforward: made several frank remarks about the quality of their work.
2. Clearly manifest; evident: frank enjoyment.
tr.v. franked, frank·ing, franks
1.
a. To put an official mark on (a piece of mail) so that it can be sent free of charge.
b. To send (mail) free of charge.
2. To place a stamp or mark on (a piece of mail) to show the payment of postage.
3. To enable (a person) to come and go freely.
n.
1.
a. A mark or signature placed on a piece of mail to indicate the right to send it free of charge.
b. The right to send mail free.
2. A franked piece of mail.

[Middle English, free, from Old French franc, from Late Latin Francus, Frank; see Frank.]

frank′ness n.
Synonyms: frank1, candid, forthright, outspoken, straightforward, open
These adjectives mean revealing or disposed to reveal one's thoughts freely and honestly. Frank implies directness, sometimes to the point of bluntness: "And yes, to be frank, the singing was atrocious" (Eileen Pollack).
Candid and forthright often suggest refusal to evade difficult or unpleasant issues: "Save, save, oh save me from the candid friend!" (George Canning)."He wanted his countrymen to know the truth, and he was forthright about the challenges they faced" (Sean Hannity).
Outspoken usually implies bold lack of reserve: "She is outspoken to the point of never holding back, on politics or much else" (Joseph Epstein).
Straightforward denotes directness of manner and expression: "George was a straightforward soul....'See here!' he said. 'Are you engaged to anybody?'" (Booth Tarkington).
Open suggests freedom from all trace of reserve or secretiveness: "I will be open and sincere with you" (Joseph Addison).

frank 2

 (frăngk)
n. Informal
A frankfurter.

Frank

 (frăngk)
n.
A member of one of the Germanic tribes of the Rhine region in the early Christian era, especially one of the Salian Franks who conquered Gaul about ad 500 and established an extensive empire that reached its greatest power in the ninth century.

[Middle English, from Old English Franca and Old French Franc, both from Late Latin Francus, of Germanic origin.]

frank•ness

(ˈfræŋk nɪs)

n.
plainness of speech; candor.
[1545–55]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.frankness - the quality of being honest and straightforward in attitude and speech
honestness, honesty - the quality of being honest
ingenuousness - openly straightforward or frank
2.frankness - the trait of being blunt and outspoken
communicativeness - the trait of being communicative
bluffness - good-natured frankness

frankness

noun outspokenness, openness, candour, truthfulness, plain speaking, bluntness, forthrightness, laying it on the line, ingenuousness, absence of reserve The reaction to his frankness was hostile.
Translations
őszinteség

frankness

[ˈfræŋknɪs] Nfranqueza f, sinceridad f

frankness

[ˈfræŋknɪs] nfranchise f

frankness

nOffenheit f; (of opinion also)Ehrlichkeit f; (of discussion also)Freimütigkeit f

frankness

[ˈfræŋknɪs] nfranchezza
References in classic literature ?
Her face was captivating by reason of a certain frankness of expression and a contradictory subtle play of features.
It would have been easy for him to get out of it; but his natural impulse was for frankness, and he remembered his old resolve to be frank, no matter what happened.
Likewise, though she spoke as before concerning her affairs, it was never with complete frankness.
The result, of course, was that the young girl who was the centre of this elaborate system of mystification remained the more inscrutable for her very frankness and assurance.
But I thought that was perhaps no more than a natural reserve accentuated by the verbose frankness of her husband.
They are rather helplessly frank, but not, I hope, with all their rather helpless frankness, offensively frank.
I hope that my frankness at least will make you my friend; for you are the only young man to whom I have hitherto spoken as I have done to you.
On the most profitable lie the course of events presently lays a destructive tax; whilst frankness invites frankness, puts the parties on a convenient footing and makes their business a friendship.
This child, to my memory, really lives in a setting of beauty and misery that no words can translate; there was a distinction all his own in every impulse he revealed; never was a small natural creature, to the uninitiated eye all frankness and freedom, a more ingenious, a more extraordinary little gentleman.
But they would have been improved by some share of his frankness and warmth; and her visit was long enough to detract something from their first admiration, by shewing that, though perfectly well-bred, she was reserved, cold, and had nothing to say for herself beyond the most common-place inquiry or remark.
He was evidently satisfied with the frankness of my story, which I told in concise sentences enough, for I felt horribly weak; and when it was finished he reverted at once to the topic of Natural History and his own biological studies.
Certainly the ablest men that ever were, have had all an openness, and frankness, of dealing; and a name of certainty and veracity; but then they were like horses well managed; for they could tell passing well, when to stop or turn; and at such times, when they thought the case indeed required dissimulation, if then they used it, it came to pass that the former opinion, spread abroad, of their good faith and clearness of dealing, made them almost invisible.