fraternity


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fra·ter·ni·ty

 (frə-tûr′nĭ-tē)
n. pl. fra·ter·ni·ties
1. A body of people associated for a common purpose or interest, such as a guild.
2. A group of people joined by similar backgrounds, occupations, interests, or tastes: the fraternity of bird watchers.
3. A social organization at a college or university, traditionally consisting of male students and designated by Greek letters.
4. Roman Catholic Church A sodality.
5. The quality or condition of being brothers; brotherliness.

[Middle English fraternite, from Old French, from Latin frāternitās, from frāternus, fraternal; see fraternal.]

fraternity

(frəˈtɜːnɪtɪ)
n, pl -ties
1. a body of people united in interests, aims, etc: the teaching fraternity. Gender-neutral form: community
2. brotherhood
3. (Education) US and Canadian a secret society joined by male students, usually functioning as a social club

fra•ter•ni•ty

(frəˈtɜr nɪ ti)

n., pl. -ties.
1. a local or national social organization of male students usu. with secret initiation and rites and a name composed of Greek letters.
2. a group of persons associated by or as if by ties of brotherhood.
3. any group or class of persons having common purposes or interests.
4. an organization of laymen for religious or charitable purposes; sodality.
5. the quality or state of being brotherly; brotherhood.
[1300–50; Middle English < Latin]

fraternity

a fellowship or association of men, as for a benevolent or charitable purpose or at a college.
See also: Society

Fraternity

 a group of men joined by a common interest or organized for religious purposes, 1330. See also brotherhood, fellowship, guild.
Examples: fraternity of couriers, 1838; of free masons, 1851; of goldsmiths, 1870; of mercers, 1483; of vagabonds, 1561.

fraternity

An organization of male students at a college or university, primarily for social activities.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.fraternity - a social club for male undergraduatesfraternity - a social club for male undergraduates
gild, guild, social club, society, club, lodge, order - a formal association of people with similar interests; "he joined a golf club"; "they formed a small lunch society"; "men from the fraternal order will staff the soup kitchen today"
chapter - a local branch of some fraternity or association; "he joined the Atlanta chapter"
2.fraternity - people engaged in a particular occupation; "the medical fraternity"
social class, socio-economic class, stratum, class - people having the same social, economic, or educational status; "the working class"; "an emerging professional class"
brother - a male person who is a fellow member (of a fraternity or religion or other group); "none of his brothers would betray him"
sodalist - a member of a sodality

fraternity

noun
1. companionship, fellowship, brotherhood, kinship, camaraderie, comradeship He needs the fraternity of others.
2. circle, company, set, order, clan, guild the spread of stolen guns among the criminal fraternity
3. brotherhood, club, union, society, league, association, sodality He joined a college fraternity.

fraternity

noun
A group of people united in a relationship and having some interest, activity, or purpose in common:
Translations
أخَويَّه رهبانيَّهجَماعَه أخويّه، رابِطَهجَمعِيَّة مِن الطُّلّاب الذُّكور
bratrstvochlapecký studentský spolekprofesespolečenství
broderskabgruppestand
veljeskuntaveljeys
bratstvo
diákklubtestvériesség
bræîralag, félagasamtökfélagssamtök karlmanna; bræîralag
fraternitate
chlapčenský študentský spolok
birlikcemiyetdernekerkek öğrenciler derneğikardeşlik derneği

fraternity

[frəˈtɜːnɪtɪ] N
1. (= comradeship) → fraternidad f
2. (US) (Univ) → círculo m estudiantil
3. (= organization) → hermandad f
the criminal fraternityel mundo del hampa
the yachting fraternitylos aficionados a la vela SORORITY/FRATERNITY

fraternity

[frəˈtɜːrnɪti] n
(= friendship and support) → fraternité f
(= social group) → confrérie f, communauté f
the sailing fraternity → la confrérie des marins
(US) (in university) association d'étudiants sélective

fraternity

n
no plBrüderlichkeit f
(= community)Vereinigung f, → Zunft f; (Eccl) → Bruderschaft f; (US Univ) → Verbindung f; the legal/medical/teaching fraternitydie Juristen pl/Mediziner pl/Lehrer pl; the hunting/sailing fraternitydie Jagd-/Segelfans pl; the criminal fraternitydie Kriminellen pl, → die Unterwelt ? also sorority

fraternity

[frəˈtɜːnɪtɪ] nfraternità; (club) → associazione f; (spirit) → fratellanza (Am) (Univ) associazione studentesca maschile

fraternal

(frəˈtəːnl) adjective
of or like a brother. a fraternal greeting.
fraˈternally adverb
fraˈternityplural fraˈternities noun
1. a company of people who regard each other as equals, eg monks.
2. a company of people with the same interest, job etc. the banking fraternity.
3. (American) a society of male students in various universities.
References in classic literature ?
Not surely her cousin Hepzibah's, who had no taste nor spirits for the lady-like employment of cultivating flowers, and--with her recluse habits, and tendency to shelter herself within the dismal shadow of the house--would hardly have come forth under the speck of open sky to weed and hoe among the fraternity of beans and squashes.
Our grand master is still to be named; for like royal kings of old times, we find the headwaters of our fraternity in nothing short of the great gods themselves.
It would not do, Ostrinski explained, for the proletariat of one nation to achieve the victory, for that nation would be crushed by the military power of the others; and so the Socialist movement was a world movement, an organization of all mankind to establish liberty and fraternity.
I have a woman's heart, but not where you are concerned; for you I have only a comrade's constancy; a fellow-soldier's frankness, fidelity, fraternity, if you like; a neophyte's respect and submission to his hierophant: nothing more--don't fear.
Every town-gate and village taxing-house had its band of citizen- patriots, with their national muskets in a most explosive state of readiness, who stopped all comers and goers, cross-questioned them, inspected their papers, looked for their names in lists of their own, turned them back, or sent them on, or stopped them and laid them in hold, as their capricious judgment or fancy deemed best for the dawning Republic One and Indivisible, of Liberty, Equality, Fraternity, or Death.
But as the stockfish was highly salted, and the ale reasonably powerful, the jaws of the brethren were too anxiously employed to admit of their making much use of their ears; nor do we read of any of the fraternity, who was tempted to speculate upon the mysterious hints of their Superior, except Father Diggory, who was severely afflicted by the toothache, so that be could only eat on one side of his jaws.
This artist is much encouraged and esteemed by the whole fraternity.
I do not understand it," said Don Quixote; but one of the guards said to him, "Sir, to sing under suffering means with the non sancta fraternity to confess under torture; they put this sinner to the torture and he confessed his crime, which was being a cuatrero, that is a cattle-stealer, and on his confession they sentenced him to six years in the galleys, besides two bundred lashes that he has already had on the back; and he is always dejected and downcast because the other thieves that were left behind and that march here ill-treat, and snub, and jeer, and despise him for confessing and not having spirit enough to say nay; for, say they, 'nay' has no more letters in it than
It was a mysterious fraternity born of the smoke and dan- ger of death.
And do you think your power as great with the fraternity as monsieur le cure told me it was just now?
Her name was Hannah and her husband's Matthew; two homely names, yet well enough adapted to the simple pair, who seemed strangely out of place among the whimsical fraternity whose wits had been set agog by the Great Carbuncle.
A fourth requested, in the name of the whole medical fraternity, that Cotton Mather would confine his attention to people's souls, and leave the physicians to take care of their bodies.