fraud


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fraud

 (frôd)
n.
1. A deception practiced in order to induce another to give up possession of property or surrender a right.
2. A piece of trickery; a trick.
3.
a. One that defrauds; a cheat.
b. One who assumes a false pose; an impostor.

[Middle English fraude, from Old French, from Latin fraus, fraud-.]

fraud

(frɔːd)
n
1. deliberate deception, trickery, or cheating intended to gain an advantage
2. an act or instance of such deception
3. something false or spurious: his explanation was a fraud.
4. informal a person who acts in a false or deceitful way
[C14: from Old French fraude, from Latin fraus deception]

fraud

(frɔd)

n.
1. deceit or trickery perpetrated for profit or to gain some unfair or dishonest advantage.
2. a particular instance of such deceit or trickery: mail fraud; election frauds.
3. something that is not what it pretends.
4. a deceitful person; impostor.
[1300–50; Middle English fraude < Old French < Latin fraud-, s. of fraus deceit, injury]
syn: See deceit.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.fraud - intentional deception resulting in injury to another person
crime, criminal offence, criminal offense, law-breaking, offense, offence - (criminal law) an act punishable by law; usually considered an evil act; "a long record of crimes"
barratry - (maritime law) a fraudulent breach of duty by the master of a ship that injures the owner of the ship or its cargo; includes every breach of trust such as stealing or sinking or deserting the ship or embezzling the cargo
identity theft - the co-option of another person's personal information (e.g., name, Social Security number, credit card number, passport) without that person's knowledge and the fraudulent use of such knowledge
mail fraud - use of the mails to defraud someone
election fraud - misrepresentation or alteration of the true results of an election
constructive fraud, legal fraud - comprises all acts or omissions or concealments involving breach of equitable or legal duty or trust or confidence
collateral fraud, extrinsic fraud - fraud that prevents a party from knowing their rights or from having a fair opportunity of presenting them at trial
fraud in fact, positive fraud - actual deceit; concealing something or making a false representation with an evil intent to cause injury to another
fraud in the factum - fraud that arises from a disparity between the instrument intended to be executed and the instrument actually executed; e.g., leading someone to sign the wrong contract
fraud in the inducement - fraud which intentionally causes a person to execute and instrument or make an agreement or render a judgment; e.g., misleading someone about the true facts
intrinsic fraud - fraud (as by use of forged documents or false claims or perjury) that misleads a court or jury and induces a finding for the one perpetrating the fraud
swindle, cheat, rig - the act of swindling by some fraudulent scheme; "that book is a fraud"
2.fraud - a person who makes deceitful pretensesfraud - a person who makes deceitful pretenses
beguiler, cheater, deceiver, trickster, slicker, cheat - someone who leads you to believe something that is not true
name dropper - someone who pretends that famous people are his/her friends
ringer - a contestant entered in a competition under false pretenses
3.fraud - something intended to deceive; deliberate trickery intended to gain an advantage
chicanery, wile, shenanigan, trickery, guile, chicane - the use of tricks to deceive someone (usually to extract money from them)
goldbrick - anything that is supposed to be valuable but turns out to be worthless

fraud

noun
2. scam, craft, cheat, sting (informal), deception (slang), artifice, humbug, canard, stratagems, chicane a fraud involving pension and social security claims
3. hoax, trick, cheat, con (informal), deception, sham, spoof (informal), prank, swindle, ruse, practical joke, joke, fast one (informal), imposture He never wrote the letter; it was a fraud.
4. (Informal) impostor, cheat, fake, bluffer, sham, hoax, hoaxer, forgery, counterfeit, pretender, charlatan, quack, fraudster, swindler, mountebank, grifter (slang, chiefly U.S. & Canad.), double-dealer, phoney or phony (informal) He believes many psychics are frauds.

fraud

noun
1. An act of cheating:
Informal: flimflam.
Slang: gyp.
Translations
تَزْوِيرخِداع، إحْتيال، غِشخَدّاع، غَشّاش، مُزَوِّر
podvodpodvodník
bedragerbedragerisnydsvindler
petos
prevara
sviksvikari, loddari
詐欺
사기
apgavikiškaiapgavikiškas
krāpniekskrāpšana
goljufponeverba
bedrägeri
การโกง
lừa đảo

fraud

[frɔːd]
A. N
1. (Jur) → fraude m
2. (= trickery) → estafa f; (= trick, con) → engaño m, timo m
3. (= person) → impostor(a) m/f, farsante mf
B. CPD fraud squad Nbrigada f de delitos económicos, brigada f anticorrupción

fraud

[ˈfrɔːd]
n
(= crime) → fraude f
He was jailed for fraud → On l'a mis en prison pour fraude.
(= impostor) → imposteur m
He's not a real doctor, he's a fraud → Ce n'est pas un vrai médecin, c'est un imposteur.
(= charlatan) → imposteur m
modif [charge, investigation] → pour fraude
a fraud case → une affaire de fraudeFraud Squad fraud squad nservice m de la répression des fraudes

fraud

n
(no pl: = trickery) → Betrug m; (= trick)Schwindel m, → Betrug m; fraudsBetrügereien pl
(= fraudulent person)Betrüger(in) m(f), → Schwindler(in) m(f); (feigning illness) → Simulant(in) m(f); (= fraudulent thing)(reiner) Schwindel, fauler Zauber (inf); the whole thing was a frauddas ganze war (ein einziger) Schwindel or reiner Schwindel

fraud

[frɔːd] n (Law) → frode f; (trickery, trick) → truffa; (person) → imbroglione/a, impostore/a

fraud

(froːd) noun
1. (an act of) dishonesty. He was sent to prison for fraud.
2. a person who pretends to be something that he isn't. That man is not a famous writer, he's a fraud.
ˈfraudulent (-djulənt) , ((American) -dʒulənt) adjective
dishonest or intending to deceive. fraudulent behaviour.
ˈfraudulently adverb
ˈfraudulence noun

fraud

تَزْوِير podvod snyd Betrug απάτη fraude petos fraude prevara frode 詐欺 사기 fraude bedrageri oszustwo fraude мошенничество bedrägeri การโกง dolandırıcılık lừa đảo 欺诈行为
References in classic literature ?
Let others- the young- yield afresh to that fraud, but we know life, our life is finished
It may also be brought about by fraud in two different ways, either when the people, being at first deceived, willingly consent to an alteration in their government, and are afterwards obliged by force to abide by it: as, for instance, when the four hundred imposed upon the people by telling them that the king of Persia would supply them with money for the war against the Lacedaemonians; and after they had been guilty of this falsity, they endeavoured to keep possession of the supreme power; or when they are at first persuaded and afterwards consent to be governed: and by one of these methods which I have mentioned are all revolutions in governments brought about.
The Sheep, fearing some fraud was intended, excused herself, saying, "The Wolf is accustomed to seize what he wants and to run off; and you, too, can quickly outstrip me in your rapid flight.
AN eminent Justice of the Supreme Court of Patagascar was accused of having obtained his appointment by fraud.
The unhappy girl committed suicide on discovering the fraud to which she had been subjected.
But it warn't no use; he stormed right along, and said any man that pretended to be an Englishman and couldn't imitate the lingo no better than what he did was a fraud and a liar.
Gentlemen, I have no hesitation in telling you that it was the fact of Tchebaroff's intervention that made me suspect a fraud.
The principal duty of a judge, is to suppress force and fraud; whereof force is the more pernicious, when it is open, and fraud, when it is close and disguised.
This Jellia dared not tell, having been threatened with death by the witch if she confessed the fraud.
The Sun was sunk, and after him the Starr Of HESPERUS, whose Office is to bring Twilight upon the Earth, short Arbiter Twixt Day and Night, and now from end to end Nights Hemisphere had veild the Horizon round: When SATAN who late fled before the threats Of GABRIEL out of EDEN, now improv'd In meditated fraud and malice, bent On mans destruction, maugre what might hap Of heavier on himself, fearless return'd.
It is the peculiar province, for instance, of a court of equity to relieve against what are called hard bargains: these are contracts in which, though there may have been no direct fraud or deceit, sufficient to invalidate them in a court of law, yet there may have been some undue and unconscionable advantage taken of the necessities or misfortunes of one of the parties, which a court of equity would not tolerate.
With that speech, Dick consoled himself for his imposture; she was not deceived so grossly after all; and then if a fraud, was not the fraud piety itself?