freewoman


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freewoman

(ˈfriːˌwʊmən)
n, pl -women
1. a woman who is free or at liberty, esp one who is not a slave or serf
2. a woman who has been granted the freedom of a town, city, etc
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.freewoman - a person who is not a serf or a slave
citizen - a native or naturalized member of a state or other political community
freedman, freedwoman - a person who has been freed from slavery
References in periodicals archive ?
Bertha Coats was interested in many areas of welfare in the community but particularly with the wellbeing of children and she was recognised for this becoming a Freewoman of Paisley.
As examples of this marginalization: the magazine The New Freewoman lost all political feminist message once Pound transformed it into The Egoist (Frost 2003; 169); the anthology New American Poetry by Donald Allen included only four contemporary experimental women poets (Keller and Miller 2005; 84); Beat women participated in the edition of many avant-garde magazines but were eclipsed by their male co-editors (Friedman 1998: 231).
Writing in The Freewoman in 1912, Rebecca West--herself a supporter of women's suffrage--denounced with characteristic acerbity the increasing popularity of "degradations of the drama written by propagandists," complaining that "the public taste has already been so perverted that dislocated Suffrage speeches.
For it is written, that Abraham had two sons, the one by a bondmaid, the other by a freewoman.
And the anti-state feminist Dora Marsden edited three magazines here: The Freewoman, The New Freewoman, and The Egoist.
And now she is being offered another title - Tanni Grey-Thompson, Freewoman of Redcar and Cleveland.
Among the ancient privileges afforded to a Freeman or Freewoman is the right to bring goods into Dublin through the city gates without paying customs duties, pasture sheep on common ground within the city boundaries including St Stephen's Green, and vote in municipal and parliamentary elections.
In The Freewoman of 15 February 1912, a precocious Rebecca West reviewed Mrs Humphry Ward's avowedly pro-reformist novel, The Case of Richard Meynell, sympathetic to theological modernism in its social guise.
Her earliest writings in feminist publications such as The Freewoman and Time and 77de vituperatively advocate for equality between the sexes.
She was welcomed home to Calderdale by thousands as she was awarded the Honorary Freewoman of the Borough, the highest accolade the council can bestow.
She attacked British imperialism in Dora Marsden's Freewoman, denying the distinction between Britain's benevolent imperialism and malevolent imperia1ism.
Civic leaders in Brighton and Hove decided to make the Nobel Peace Prize-winner an honorary freewoman for her human rights record.