freewoman


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freewoman

(ˈfriːˌwʊmən)
n, pl -women
1. a woman who is free or at liberty, esp one who is not a slave or serf
2. a woman who has been granted the freedom of a town, city, etc
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.freewoman - a person who is not a serf or a slave
citizen - a native or naturalized member of a state or other political community
freedman, freedwoman - a person who has been freed from slavery
References in periodicals archive ?
And the anti-state feminist Dora Marsden edited three magazines here: The Freewoman, The New Freewoman, and The Egoist.
And now she is being offered another title - Tanni Grey-Thompson, Freewoman of Redcar and Cleveland.
Among the ancient privileges afforded to a Freeman or Freewoman is the right to bring goods into Dublin through the city gates without paying customs duties, pasture sheep on common ground within the city boundaries including St Stephen's Green, and vote in municipal and parliamentary elections.
She was welcomed home to Calderdale by thousands as she was awarded the Honorary Freewoman of the Borough, the highest accolade the council can bestow.
She attacked British imperialism in Dora Marsden's Freewoman, denying the distinction between Britain's benevolent imperialism and malevolent imperia1ism.
Civic leaders in Brighton and Hove decided to make the Nobel Peace Prize-winner an honorary freewoman for her human rights record.
24) Backus argued that the Gospel, the freewoman, established a covenant of grace, which abolished works.
The book pays special attention to Pound's attempts to participate in--and re-conceptualize --literary reviews he came across, including Poetry in Chicago, The New Freewoman (later Egoist), BLAST, the New Age, and the Little Review in New York.
Abandoning a theatrical career, West began writing for journals such as The New Freewoman and The Clarion, and was adopted by literary lights such as Ford Madox Ford, who admired her keen intelligence and astringent style.
Mayor Angela Lupton said she was "thrilled that the First Lady would become the first Freewoman of Galway".
117-23 for a discussion of the Fabian women and the proposals in the Freewoman.
Our understanding of what women envisioned is enhanced by Betterton's discussion of Olive Shreiner's influence among suffrage supporters and of letters between two working women who were active in the Women's Freedom League and in the Freewoman Circle.