freezing


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freeze

 (frēz)
v. froze (frōz), fro·zen (frō′zən), freez·ing, freez·es
v.intr.
1.
a. To pass from the liquid to the solid state by loss of heat.
b. To acquire a surface or coat of ice from cold: The lake froze over in January. Bridges freeze before the adjacent roads.
2. To become clogged or jammed because of the formation of ice: The pipes froze in the basement.
3. To be at that degree of temperature at which ice forms: It may freeze tonight.
4. To be killed or harmed by cold or frost: They almost froze to death. Mulch keeps garden plants from freezing.
5. To be or feel uncomfortably cold: Aren't you freezing without a coat?
6.
a. To become fixed, stuck, or attached by or as if by frost: The lock froze up with rust.
b. To stop functioning properly, usually temporarily: My computer screen froze when I opened the infected program.
7.
a. To become motionless or immobile, as from surprise or attentiveness: I heard a sound and froze in my tracks.
b. To become unable to act or speak, as from fear: froze in front of the audience.
8. To become rigid and inflexible; solidify: an opinion that froze into dogma.
v.tr.
1.
a. To convert into ice.
b. To cause ice to form upon.
c. To cause to congeal or stiffen from extreme cold: winter cold that froze the ground.
2. To preserve (foods, for example) by subjecting to freezing temperatures.
3. To damage, kill, or make inoperative by cold or by the formation of ice.
4. To make very cold; chill.
5. To immobilize, as with fear or shock.
6. To chill with an icy or formal manner: froze me with one look.
7. To stop the motion or progress of: The negotiations were frozen by the refusal of either side to compromise; froze the video in order to discuss the composition of the frame.
8.
a. To fix (prices or wages, for example) at a given or current level.
b. To prohibit further manufacture or use of.
c. To prevent or restrict the exchange, withdrawal, liquidation, or granting of by governmental action: freeze investment loans during a depression; froze foreign assets held by US banks.
9. To anesthetize by chilling.
10. Sports To keep possession of (a ball or puck) so as to deny an opponent the opportunity to score.
n.
1.
a. The act of freezing.
b. The state of being frozen.
2. A spell of cold weather; a frost.
3. A restriction that forbids a quantity from rising above a given or current level: a freeze on city jobs; a proposed freeze on the production of nuclear weapons.
Phrasal Verb:
freeze out
To shut out or exclude, as by cold or unfriendly treatment: The others tried to freeze me out of the conversation.
Idiom:
freeze (someone's) blood
To affect with terror or dread; horrify: a scream that froze my blood.

[Middle English fresen, from Old English frēosan; see preus- in Indo-European roots.]

freez′a·ble adj.
Word History: Describing the landscape of Hell in Book II of Paradise Lost, Milton depicts "a frozen Continent ... beat with perpetual storms ... the parching Air Burns frore, and cold performs th' effect of Fire." It is evident from these lines that frore has some relationship to frozen, but what exactly is it? The Modern English paradigm for the verb freeze is freeze, froze, frozen, with a z throughout. However, in Old English, the principal parts were frēosan, frēas, froren. The r in the past participle froren is from a prehistoric s that became r by Verner's Law, a sound shift that changed s in certain positions into r. (The effects of Verner's Law can also be seen in such Modern English pairs as was and were, and lose and (love-)lorn.) During the Middle English period, a new past participle frosen was created using the s from the first two principal parts; this survives as frozen nowadays. The older participle, spelled froren or frore in Middle English, lived on as a poetic word for "cold," but well before Milton's day it had become archaic in the standard language.

freezing

(ˈfriːzɪŋ)
adj
informal extremely cold

freezing

Change of state from liquid to solid.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.freezing - the withdrawal of heat to change something from a liquid to a solidfreezing - the withdrawal of heat to change something from a liquid to a solid
chilling, cooling, temperature reduction - the process of becoming cooler; a falling temperature
freeze-drying, lyophilisation, lyophilization - a method of drying food or blood plasma or pharmaceuticals or tissue without destroying their physical structure; material is frozen and then warmed in a vacuum so that the ice sublimes
icing, frost - the formation of frost or ice on a surface
phase change, phase transition, physical change, state change - a change from one state (solid or liquid or gas) to another without a change in chemical composition

freezing

adjective
1. icy, biting, bitter, raw, chill, chilled, penetrating, arctic, numbing, polar, Siberian, frosty, glacial, wintry, parky (Brit. informal), cold as ice, frost-bound, cutting a freezing January afternoon
2. frozen, chilled, numb, chilly, very cold, shivery, benumbed, frozen to the marrow You must be freezing!

freezing

adjective
Very cold:
Archaic: frore.
Idiom: bitter cold.
Translations
بَارِدٌ جِداًبارد جدا، مُجَمِّد
ledovýmrazivý
frysendeiskold
jäätävän kylmä
leden
hideg: nagyon hideg
ískaldur
凍るような
혹한의
iskall
เย็นเฉียบ
çok soğukdondurucu
lạnh giá

freezing

[ˈfriːzɪŋ]
A. ADJglacial, helado
I'm freezingestoy helado
it's freezing in hereaquí se congela uno, aquí hace un frío que pela
B. ADV it's freezing coldhace un frío horrible or que pela
C. N
1. (also freezing point) → punto m de congelación
five degrees below freezingcinco grados bajo cero
2. (= deep freezing) → (ultra)congelación f
3. (fig) [of prices, wages, assets] → congelación f
D. CPD freezing fog Nniebla f helada

freezing

[ˈfriːzɪŋ]
adj
[room, building] → glacial(e); [day] → glacial(e)
It's freezing outside → Il gèle dehors.
[person] → gelé(e); [hands, feet] → gelé(e)
I'm freezing! → Je suis gelé!
Your hands are freezing cold → Tu as les mains gelées.
[water] (= very cold) → gelé(e)
n
3 degrees below freezing → 3 degrés au-dessous de zérofreezing point npoint m de congélation
below freezing point → au-dessous de zéro

freezing

adj
(lit: = below zero) temperatureunter null; freezing conditionsTemperaturen plunter null; freezing weatherFrostwetter nt; freezing rainEisregen m; in freezing fogbei Frost und Nebel
(= extremely cold)eiskalt, eisig kalt; windeisig; in the freezing coldbei klirrender Kälte; it’s freezing (cold)es ist eiskalt or eisig kalt; I’m freezingmir ist eiskalt; my hands/feet are freezingmeine Hände/Füße sind eiskalt, ich habe eiskalte Hände/Füße
n
(Cook) → Einfrieren nt
(= freezing point)der Gefrierpunkt; above/below freezingüber/unter null, über/unter dem Gefrierpunkt; to rise above freezingüber null or über den Gefrierpunkt steigen; to fall below freezingunter null or unter den Gefrierpunkt fallen

freezing

[ˈfriːzɪŋ]
1. n (also freezing point) → punto di congelamento
5 degrees below freezing → 5 gradi sotto zero
2. adj (room, weather) → gelido/a
I'm freezing → sono congelato

freeze

(friːz) past tense froze (frəuz) : past participle frozen (ˈfrəuzn) verb
1. to make into or become ice. It's so cold that the river has frozen over.
2. (of weather) to be at or below freezing-point. If it freezes again tonight all my plants will die.
3. to make or be very cold. If you had stayed out all night in the snow you might have frozen to death (= died of exposure to cold).
4. to make (food) very cold in order to preserve it. You can freeze the rest of that food and eat it later.
5. to make or become stiff, still or unable to move (with fear etc). She froze when she heard the strange noise.
6. to fix prices, wages etc at a certain level. If the situation does not improve, wages will be frozen again.
noun
a period of very cold weather when temperatures are below freezing-point. How long do you think the freeze will last?
ˈfreezer noun
a cabinet for keeping food at, or bringing it down to, a temperature below freezing-point.
ˈfreezing adjective
very cold. This room's freezing.
ˈfrozen adjective
ˈfreezing-point noun
the temperature at which a liquid becomes solid. The freezing-point of water is 0 centigrade.
freeze up
to stop moving or functioning because of extreme cold. The car engine froze up.

freezing

بَارِدٌ جِداً mrazivý frysende eiskalt παγερός congelado jäätävän kylmä glacé leden gelido 凍るような 혹한의 ijskoud iskald mrożący gelado ледяной iskall เย็นเฉียบ dondurucu lạnh giá 冰冻的

freez·ing

n. congelación;
___ pointpunto de ___.
References in classic literature ?
One hundred and twenty-nine on the thermometer constitutes a very hot day, yet such a temperature is but ninety-seven degrees above freezing.
They feared their half-famished horses would soon share his fate, for there seemed scarce blood enough left in their veins to withstand the freezing cold.
Indeed, during the sojourn of Captain Bonneville in this neighborhood, which was in the heart of winter, he found the weather, with the exception of a few cold and stormy days, generally mild and pleasant, freezing a little at night but invariably thawing with the morning's sun-resembling the spring weather in the middle parts of the United States.
Tarwater, stoking the fire, would sometimes ask Liverpool, beating now one released hand and now the other as he fought for circulation where he steered in the freezing stern-sheets.
Aouda, cosily packed in furs and cloaks, was sheltered as much as possible from the attacks of the freezing wind.
The pond had in the meanwhile skimmed over in the shadiest and shallowest coves, some days or even weeks before the general freezing.
But the cold was too intense to allow us to do so, for I am convinced that at this great altitude the thermometer cannot have marked less than fourteen or fifteen degrees below freezing point.
And the preservative-adverse have an ally in the frozen aisle, since freezing is a way to preserve foods, so some frozen products contain few or no added preservatives.
2 : to be uncomfortably cold <It's freezing in here.
But with engineering resins such as these, there's a greater risk of freezing off the die than with less sensitive commodity resins like polyethylene, polypropylene, or polystyrene.
One of the managers knew of our new freezing technology.
Outlining basic procedures before and after freezing that enhance and optimise the quality and texture of frozen foods, the Handbook of Frozen Foods contains more than 1700 current references for further exploration of the topic, tables and examples illustrating the effect of various chemical and biochemical reactions on the quality of frozen food systems; methods to select the most appropriate packaging materials for frozen foods; practical guidelines to ensure the safety of frozen food products, and strategies to reduce the deterioration rate of frozen foods.