fresco


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fres·co

 (frĕs′kō)
n. pl. fres·coes or fres·cos
1. The art of painting on fresh, moist plaster with pigments dissolved in water.
2. A painting executed in this way.
tr.v. fres·coed, fres·co·ing, fres·coes
To paint in fresco.

[Italian, fresh (plaster), of Germanic origin.]

fres′co·er, fres′co·ist n.

fresco

(ˈfrɛskəʊ)
n, pl -coes or -cos
1. (Art Terms) a very durable method of wall-painting using watercolours on wet plaster or, less properly, dry plaster (fresco secco), with a less durable result
2. (Art Terms) a painting done in this way
[C16: from Italian: fresh plaster, coolness, from fresco (adj) fresh, cool, of Germanic origin]

fres•co

(ˈfrɛs koʊ)

n., pl. -coes, -cos,
n.
1. the art or technique of painting on a moist plaster surface with colors ground up in water or a limewater mixture.
2. a picture or design so painted.
v.t.
3. to paint in fresco.
[1590–1600; < Italian: cool, fresh (< Germanic)]

fresco

The technique of painting on moist lime plaster with colors ground in water or a limewater mixture. The paint and plaster bond chemically to become permanent.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.fresco - a mural done with watercolors on wet plasterfresco - a mural done with watercolors on wet plaster
mural, wall painting - a painting that is applied to a wall surface
2.fresco - a durable method of painting on a wall by using watercolors on wet plaster
painting - creating a picture with paints; "he studied painting and sculpture for many years"
Verb1.fresco - paint onto wet plaster on a wall
artistic creation, artistic production, art - the creation of beautiful or significant things; "art does not need to be innovative to be good"; "I was never any good at art"; "he said that architecture is the art of wasting space beautifully"
paint - make a painting; "he painted all day in the garden"; "He painted a painting of the garden"
Translations
رَسْم جِدار مائي
freska
freskokalkmaleri
freskó
freska, mynd
freska
freska
freska
fresk

fresco

[ˈfreskəʊ] N (frescoes or frescos (pl)) → fresco m

fresco

[ˈfrɛskəʊ] nfresque f

fresco

n (= technique)Freskomalerei f; (= painting)Fresko(gemälde) nt

fresco

[ˈfrɛskəʊ] naffresco

fresco

(ˈfreskəu) plural ˈfresco(e)s noun
a picture painted on a wall while the plaster is still wet.
References in classic literature ?
John's head as a boy--painted in fresco on a brick.
The walls, painted in fresco, represented a flowery trellis.
It is only in accordance with general principles of human nature that the "bloofer lady" should be the popular role at these al fresco performances.
The chamber from which our specimen was taken, was said to be very rich in such illustrations; the walls being completely covered with fresco paintings and bas-reliefs, while statues, vases, and Mosaic work of rich patterns, indicated the vast wealth of the deceased.
He was referring to the fresco of the "Ascension of St.
She dared not question William; he was inscrutable; he never seemed even to follow the other couple with curiosity when they separated, as they frequently did, to name a plant, or examine a fresco.
These forms are more agreeable to the fancy and imagination than fresco paintings or other the most expensive furniture.
I ran to the door, but I sauntered through it, to plant myself before a Pompeiian fresco in the corridor; and there were the two attendants still gossiping outside the further door; nor did they hear the dull crash which I heard even as I watched them out of the corner of each eye.
Then I caught the faint reflection of my own face in the casing of the fresco, and it frightened me into some semblance of myself as Raffles joined me with his hands in his pockets.
Bronze chandeliers with many globes depended from the low, slightly vaulted ceiling, and the fresco paintings ran flat and dull all round the walls without windows, representing scenes of the chase and of outdoor revelry in mediaeval costumes.
To make it fair, Ruskin had relit the seven lamps of architecture, and written the seven labours of Hercules; for these windows through a whole youth Burne Jones had worshipped painted glass at Oxford, and to breathe romance into these frescos had Rossetti been born, and Dante born again.
It contains celebrated frescos designed or painted by Raphael, which most persons think it worth while to visit.