freshet

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Related to freshets: freshers

fresh·et

 (frĕsh′ĭt)
n.
1. A sudden overflow of a stream resulting from a heavy rain or a thaw.
2. A stream of fresh water that empties into a body of salt water.

freshet

(ˈfrɛʃɪt)
n
1. (Physical Geography) the sudden overflowing of a river caused by heavy rain or melting snow
2. (Physical Geography) a stream of fresh water emptying into the sea

fresh•et

(ˈfrɛʃ ɪt)

n.
1. a sudden rise in the level of a stream or a flooding caused by heavy rains or the rapid melting of snow and ice.
2. a freshwater stream flowing into the sea.
[1590–1600]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.freshet - the occurrence of a water flow resulting from sudden rain or melting snowfreshet - the occurrence of a water flow resulting from sudden rain or melting snow
flow, flowing - the motion characteristic of fluids (liquids or gases)

freshet

noun
An abundant, usually overwhelming flow or fall, as of a river or rain:
Chiefly British: spate.
Translations
References in classic literature ?
Ere long, the Malagazeri, the chief tributary of Lake Tanganayika, was seen winding between heavy thickets of verdure, offering an asylum to many water-courses that spring from the torrents formed in the season of freshets, or from ponds hollowed in the clayey soil.
Some of these, what of the wear and tear of freshets and of being stranded long summers on sand-bars, were seasoned and dry and without branches.
While we sat in the kitchen waiting for the cookies to bake or the taffy to cool, Nina used to coax Antonia to tell her stories--about the calf that broke its leg, or how Yulka saved her little turkeys from drowning in the freshet, or about old Christmases and weddings in Bohemia.
They engaged him; but straightway upon the ship's getting out of sight of land, his insanity broke out in a freshet.
She was so mad she couldn't get the words out fast enough, and she gushed them out in one everlasting freshet.
Sparkling in the sunshine, gleaming under the summer moon, cold and gray beneath a November sky, trickling over the dam in some burning July drought, swollen with turbulent power in some April freshet, how many young eyes gazed into the mystery and majesty of the falls along that river, and how many young hearts dreamed out their futures leaning over the bridge rail, seeing "the vision splendid" reflected there and often, too, watching it fade into "the light of common day.
A small table of rock which projected over the precipice on one side of the stream, and was drenched by the spray of the fall, sustained a huge trunk of a tree which must have been deposited there by some heavy freshet.
The rise of the Missouri does not generally take place until the month of May or June: the present swelling of the river must have been caused by a freshet in some of its more southern branches.
He loosed his arm from the python's neck and went down the gorge like a log in a freshet, paddling toward the far bank, where he found slack-water, and laughing aloud from sheer happiness.
Never have I known such a thrill of sensuous joy as came with that freshet of life.
He spake no dream; for, as his words had end, Our Saviour, lifting up his eyes, beheld, In ample space under the broadest shade, A table richly spread in regal mode, With dishes piled and meats of noblest sort And savour--beasts of chase, or fowl of game, In pastry built, or from the spit, or boiled, Grisamber-steamed; all fish, from sea or shore, Freshet or purling brook, of shell or fin, And exquisitest name, for which was drained Pontus, and Lucrine bay, and Afric coast.
Let us settle ourselves, and work and wedge our feet downward through the mud and slush of opinion, and prejudice, and tradition, and delusion, and appearance, that alluvion which covers the globe, through Paris and London, through New York and Boston and Concord, through Church and State, through poetry and philosophy and religion, till we come to a hard bottom and rocks in place, which we can call reality, and say, This is, and no mistake; and then begin, having a point d'appui, below freshet and frost and fire, a place where you might found a wall or a state, or set a lamp-post safely, or perhaps a gauge, not a Nilometer, but a Realometer, that future ages might know how deep a freshet of shams and appearances had gathered from time to time.