friar


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fri·ar

 (frī′ər)
n. Abbr. Fr.
A member of a usually mendicant Roman Catholic order.

[Middle English frere, from Old French, from Latin frāter, brother; see bhrāter- in Indo-European roots.]

fri′ar·ly adj.

friar

(ˈfraɪə)
n
(Christian Churches, other) a member of any of various chiefly mendicant religious orders of the Roman Catholic Church, the main orders being Black Friars (Dominicans), Grey Friars (Franciscans), White Friars (Carmelites), and Austin Friars (Augustinians). See also Black Friar, Grey Friar, White Friar, Augustinian
[C13 frere, from Old French: brother, from Latin frāter brother]
ˈfriarly adj

fri•ar

(ˈfraɪ ər)

n.
a man who is a member of one of the mendicant religious orders founded in the Middle Ages, as the Carmelites, Franciscans, or Dominicans.
[1250–1300; Middle English frier, frere brother < Old French frere < Latin frāter brother]
fri′ar•ly, adj.
monk, friar - A monk stays in a monastery; a friar does not.
See also related terms for monk.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.friar - a male member of a religious order that originally relied solely on almsfriar - a male member of a religious order that originally relied solely on alms
religious - a member of a religious order who is bound by vows of poverty and chastity and obedience
Carmelite, White Friar - a Roman Catholic friar wearing the white cloak of the Carmelite order; mendicant preachers
Black Friar, Blackfriar, Dominican, friar preacher - a Roman Catholic friar wearing the black mantle of the Dominican order
Franciscan, Grey Friar - a Roman Catholic friar wearing the grey habit of the Franciscan order
Augustinian - a Roman Catholic friar or monk belonging to one of the Augustinian monastic orders

friar

noun monk, brother, religious, prior, abbot He is a travelling Franciscan friar.
Translations

friar

[ˈfraɪəʳ] Nfraile m; (before name) → fray m
black friardominico m
grey friarfranciscano m
white friarcarmelita m

friar

[ˈfraɪər] nmoine m, frère m

friar

nMönch m; Friar JohnBruder John; Black FriarsDominikaner pl; Grey FriarsFranziskaner pl; White FriarsKarmeliter pl

friar

[ˈfraɪəʳ] nfrate m
References in classic literature ?
Or, to the unread, unsophisticated Protestant of the Middle American States, why does the passing mention of a White Friar or a White Nun, evoke such an eyeless statue in the soul?
The high and mighty Emperor of the East doth at this moment put money in the palm of a holy begging friar -- one, two, three pieces, and they be all of silver.
Well, say, Joe, you can be Friar Tuck or Much the miller's son, and lam me with a quarter-staff; or I'll be the Sheriff of Nottingham and you be Robin Hood a little while and kill me.
You'd be as bald as a friar on the top of your head in twelve months, but for me.
I mean the meeting of the King with Friar Tuck at the cell of that buxom hermit.
No soft words with me, for I know you, lying rabble," said Don Quixote, and without waiting for a reply he spurred Rocinante and with levelled lance charged the first friar with such fury and determination, that, if the friar had not flung himself off the mule, he would have brought him to the ground against his will, and sore wounded, if not killed outright.
The friar took Robin Hood on his back, Deep water he did bestride, And spake neither good word nor bad, Till he came at the other side.
He said nothing at the time, but communed within himself in this wise: "Yon is no friar of orders gray, and also, I wot, no honest yeoman goeth about in priest's garb, nor doth a thief go so for nought.
But the good friar shook his head, and bumped himself down on a very hard stone,--at which, no doubt, approving angels were gratified.
That evening and thereafter for a week they gave the Chapins the official history, as one gives it to lodgers, of Friars Pardon the house and its five farms.
But although Robin fought against the clergy, the friars and monks who did wrong, he did not fight against religion.
Scholars, Cardinals, ARCHBISHOP OF RHEIMS, Bishops, Monks, Friars, Soldiers, and Attendants.