fricative


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Related to fricative: Voiced fricative

fric·a·tive

 (frĭk′ə-tĭv)
n.
A consonant, such as f or s in English, produced by the forcing of breath through a constricted passage. Also called spirant.
adj.
Of, relating to, or being a fricative consonant.

[New Latin fricātīvus, from Latin fricātus, past participle of fricāre, to rub.]

fricative

(ˈfrɪkətɪv)
n
(Phonetics & Phonology) a continuant consonant produced by partial occlusion of the airstream, such as (f) or (z)
adj
(Phonetics & Phonology) relating to or denoting a fricative
[C19: from New Latin fricātivus, from Latin fricāre to rub]

fric•a•tive

(ˈfrɪk ə tɪv)
n.
1. a consonant sound, as (th), (v), or (h), characterized by audible friction produced by forcing the breath through a constricted or partially obstructed passage in the vocal tract.
adj.
2. of or pertaining to a fricative.
[1855–60; < Latin fricāt(us), past participle of fricāre; see friction]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.fricative - a continuant consonant produced by breath moving against a narrowing of the vocal tract
continuant, continuant consonant - consonant articulated by constricting (but not closing) the vocal tract
sibilant, sibilant consonant - a consonant characterized by a hissing sound (like s or sh)
Adj.1.fricative - of speech sounds produced by forcing air through a constricted passage (as `f', `s', `z', or `th' in both `thin' and `then')
soft - (of speech sounds); produced with the back of the tongue raised toward the hard palate; characterized by a hissing or hushing sound (as `s' and `sh')
Translations
frikativa
frikativstrujniktjesnačnik
frikativa

fricative

[ˈfrɪkətɪv]
A. ADJfricativo
B. Nfricativa f

fricative

adjReibe-; fricative consonantReibelaut m
nReibelaut m

fricative

[ˈfrɪkətɪv] n (Ling) → fricativa
References in periodicals archive ?
When such subjects get HAs that increase access to high-frequency cues, acclimatization implies, by definition [1], increased use of high-frequency speech cues and improved recognition of high-frequency phonemes, like plosive and fricative consonants.
Regarding the fricative sounds s, sh, f, z and h, another area of disputation, Blevins correctly notes that `very few Australian languages have fricative phonemes'.
The paper discusses the geographical distribution of the monophthongisation of (1) the diphthong [ei] (< [e:c]) before the palatal fricative [c] (i.
At the same time it should be mentioned that Laszlo Honti has recently considered it possible to suppose in case of congruity of the Finnic-Permic *s and the Ugric and Samoyedic *t the descent of both these sounds from an earlier common source--a voiceless dental fricative [theta] (e.
This article examines stop assibilations--defined here as processes that convert a (coronal) stop to a sibilant affricate or fricative before high vocoids, e.
He states the following: "the affricated dalet has a tendency to assimilate," (38) to which a footnote is appended on [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] that begins with the following sentence: "Given these cases of a fricative dalet .
For Toqabaqita, orthographic f represents a voiceless bilabial fricative, gw a voiced labial-velar stop, kw a voiceless labialvelar stop, ng a velar nasal, q a glottal stop, r an apical trill, and th a voiceless interdental fricative.
In the north of the Russian language area, the closest phones to Finnic h are the velar voiced stop [g] and velar voiceless fricative [[chi]] along with their palatalized counterparts, as well as the velar voiced fricative [[gamma]] (allophones of /g/).
Another claim made by Gerritsen is that Nhanda has the fricative sounds s (as in `sun'), sh (as in `shoe'), f (as in `fun'), z (as in `zoo'), and h (as in `hot') and that these are a result of Dutch influence.
Section B, which discusses the post-Conquest period (933-1012) contains the accounts of Early Middle English changes of consonants in word initial position (word-initial fricative voicing, cluster simplification and the rise of the pronoun scho), further, simplification of consonant clusters in other positions, as well as changes being continuations of the earlier processes.
A stronger tendency to reduce intervocalic s to a glottal fricative seems to be shown by later Middle Indic (Apabhramga) in grammatical morphemes.
Apart from the better-known vox, attested in the general language for the 13th, 14th and the 16th century, showing the initial original voiceless fricative becoming voiced, where the original status was restored again later in Standard English in contrast to the female form vixen, the OED (1989) attests foxe in the general language between the 13th and the 17th century.