fricative

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Related to Fricatives: Affricates

fric·a·tive

 (frĭk′ə-tĭv)
n.
A consonant, such as f or s in English, produced by the forcing of breath through a constricted passage. Also called spirant.
adj.
Of, relating to, or being a fricative consonant.

[New Latin fricātīvus, from Latin fricātus, past participle of fricāre, to rub.]

fricative

(ˈfrɪkətɪv)
n
(Phonetics & Phonology) a continuant consonant produced by partial occlusion of the airstream, such as (f) or (z)
adj
(Phonetics & Phonology) relating to or denoting a fricative
[C19: from New Latin fricātivus, from Latin fricāre to rub]

fric•a•tive

(ˈfrɪk ə tɪv)
n.
1. a consonant sound, as (th), (v), or (h), characterized by audible friction produced by forcing the breath through a constricted or partially obstructed passage in the vocal tract.
adj.
2. of or pertaining to a fricative.
[1855–60; < Latin fricāt(us), past participle of fricāre; see friction]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.fricative - a continuant consonant produced by breath moving against a narrowing of the vocal tract
continuant, continuant consonant - consonant articulated by constricting (but not closing) the vocal tract
sibilant, sibilant consonant - a consonant characterized by a hissing sound (like s or sh)
Adj.1.fricative - of speech sounds produced by forcing air through a constricted passage (as `f', `s', `z', or `th' in both `thin' and `then')
soft - (of speech sounds); produced with the back of the tongue raised toward the hard palate; characterized by a hissing or hushing sound (as `s' and `sh')
Translations
frikativa
frikativstrujniktjesnačnik
frikativa

fricative

[ˈfrɪkətɪv]
A. ADJfricativo
B. Nfricativa f

fricative

adjReibe-; fricative consonantReibelaut m
nReibelaut m

fricative

[ˈfrɪkətɪv] n (Ling) → fricativa
References in periodicals archive ?
Voiceless fricatives connect the articulatory process with the air.
To cater for the audiometric characteristics of presbycusis (5), we were careful to ensure that the speech material contained a phonemic repertoire that included different points of articulation, emphasizing fricatives, which have lower peak acoustic energy and a wider frequency spectrum (20).
The authors chose to depict short stops and fricatives in phonetic transcription as voiceless.
Variation in the pronunciation of the Spanish voiceless fricatives is basically related to the presence of the /s-9/ merger or split, to the pronunciation of /s/, and to the pronunciation of /x/.
In contrast to stops, fricatives are not dependent on context in which they occur because of the distinguished features that a fricative bears.
Harvey isolates these features, in particular those demonstrating sound-changes in the pronunciation of Old Irish, such as that which brought voicing to previously unvoiced palatal fricatives (94-96).
He had learned his lines, practiced his accent (plosive P's and B's, nasal M's and N's, palatalized fricatives, tongue tap dancing on the roof of his mouth) and a ballet of hand gestures that, he was rehearsed, either signified a) haggling; b) how-should-I-know-do-I-look-like-a-Rothschild/Einstein/Marx; or c) there-could-be-a-moron-under-that-rock-too.
6 other distinctive vowels); with PerceOcl, it is possible to evaluate the identification of stops, from 30 minimal pairs (6 stops x 5); with PerceFric, it is possible to evaluate the identification of fricatives, considering 30 contrasting pairs (6 fricatives x 5) and; finally, with PerceSon, it is possible to evaluate the identification of the sonorants, from 42 contrasting pairs (7 sonorants (3 nasals and 4 liquids) x 6).
To measure MPT, the elderly was requested to perform a deep breath in and then sustain for as long as possible the vowels /a/, /i/, /u/ and the fricatives /s/ and /z/.
Part 1 of the handbook--The History of English Pronunciation--opens with a chapter by Jeremy Smith, in which he illustrates the process of historical phonology with three case studies: voiced and voiceless fricatives as examples of the development of new phonemic categories, the relation between digraphs and diphthongs, and the causes and consequences of the Great Vowel Shift.
Consonants with a lower error frequency are fricatives (with some omission errors), affricates and nasals.
Stops include phonemes such as /p/, /t/ and /k/, and fricatives include phonemes such as /m/, /n/, /q/ ('ng') and /l/.