fricative

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Related to Fricatives: Affricates

fric·a·tive

 (frĭk′ə-tĭv)
n.
A consonant, such as f or s in English, produced by the forcing of breath through a constricted passage. Also called spirant.
adj.
Of, relating to, or being a fricative consonant.

[New Latin fricātīvus, from Latin fricātus, past participle of fricāre, to rub.]

fricative

(ˈfrɪkətɪv)
n
(Phonetics & Phonology) a continuant consonant produced by partial occlusion of the airstream, such as (f) or (z)
adj
(Phonetics & Phonology) relating to or denoting a fricative
[C19: from New Latin fricātivus, from Latin fricāre to rub]

fric•a•tive

(ˈfrɪk ə tɪv)
n.
1. a consonant sound, as (th), (v), or (h), characterized by audible friction produced by forcing the breath through a constricted or partially obstructed passage in the vocal tract.
adj.
2. of or pertaining to a fricative.
[1855–60; < Latin fricāt(us), past participle of fricāre; see friction]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.fricative - a continuant consonant produced by breath moving against a narrowing of the vocal tract
continuant, continuant consonant - consonant articulated by constricting (but not closing) the vocal tract
sibilant, sibilant consonant - a consonant characterized by a hissing sound (like s or sh)
Adj.1.fricative - of speech sounds produced by forcing air through a constricted passage (as `f', `s', `z', or `th' in both `thin' and `then')
soft - (of speech sounds); produced with the back of the tongue raised toward the hard palate; characterized by a hissing or hushing sound (as `s' and `sh')
Translations
frikativa
frikativstrujniktjesnačnik
frikativa

fricative

[ˈfrɪkətɪv]
A. ADJfricativo
B. Nfricativa f

fricative

adjReibe-; fricative consonantReibelaut m
nReibelaut m

fricative

[ˈfrɪkətɪv] n (Ling) → fricativa
References in periodicals archive ?
Proto-Kurux-Malto loses these fricatives as part of the PDr innovation, clearly separating it from Brahui.
Some specific subjects addressed include Middle English, the elimination of velar fricatives, secondary agent constructions from a diachronic perspective, and J.
The major explicit pronunciation and grammatical difficulties faced by AE learners (such as voiced and unvoiced phonemes, double or triple consonants, fricatives, affricates, nasal phonemes, past tense, plurals and auxiliary verbs) are taught through songs and rhymes at the back of each book and in a separate song and rhyme resource.
Among the universally acknowledged 'pitfalls' in the pronunciation of English are the interdental fricatives [[theta]] and [[eth]], two highly marked phonemes that are rare in the languages of the world.
For this, I will record the production of alveolar plosives and fricatives in both French and English and will study the correlation between acoustic and articulatory events.
Kurath, Hans 1956 "The loss of long consonants and the rise of voiced fricatives in Middle English", Language 32/3: 435-445.
For example, Frauenfelder and Peeters (1990), conducted four different studies to compare the perception of the final fricatives /s/ and /sh/ in monosyllabic versus trisyllabic words.
These low-intensity fricatives showed additional impairment in ONH subjects that likely reflects age-related reductions in high-frequency hearing sensitivity.
c) Fricatives like /s/ and /h/ cannot occur in the final position.
lips would form dentals, gutturals, labials, and sibilants, imitated perhaps on the electric organ, hands and eyes and mouths doing what no spoken language could ever displace, moving ineluctably toward the climactic fricatives.
This line refers to their tactile perception when walking in the sun beams and shadows under the plane-trees: the sense of softness derived from such perception is acutely suggested by such fricatives.
1975, On the Correlation of Stops and Fricatives in a Phonological System.