frieze


Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
click for a larger image
frieze1
Ionic order entablature
A. cornice
B. frieze
C. architrave
D. entablature

frieze 1

 (frēz)
n. Architecture
1. A plain or decorated horizontal part of an entablature between the architrave and cornice.
2. A decorative horizontal band, as along the upper part of a wall in a room.

[French frise, from Medieval Latin frisium, frigium, embroidery, from Latin Phrygium (opus), Phrygian (work), from Phrygia.]

frieze 2

 (frēz)
n.
1. A coarse, shaggy woolen cloth with an uncut nap.
2. A dense, low-pile surface, as in carpeting, resembling such cloth. In both senses also called frisé.

[Middle English frise, from Old French, from Medieval Latin (pannī) frīsiī, woolen (garments), from pl. of Frīsius, Frisian.]

frieze

(friːz)
n
1. (Architecture) architect
a. the horizontal band between the architrave and cornice of a classical entablature, esp one that is decorated with sculpture
b. the upper part of the wall of a room, below the cornice, esp one that is decorated
2. (Art Terms) any ornamental band or strip on a wall
[C16: from French frise, perhaps from Medieval Latin frisium, changed from Latin Phrygium Phrygian (work), from Phrygia Phrygia, famous for embroidery in gold]

frieze

(friːz)
n
(Textiles) a heavy woollen fabric with a long nap, used for coats, etc
[C15: from Old French frise, from Middle Dutch friese, vriese, perhaps from Vriese Frisian]

frieze1

(friz)

n.
1. the part of an entablature in classical architecture between the architrave and the cornice, often decorated with sculpture in low relief.
2. a decorative, often carved band, as near the top of a wall or piece of furniture.
[1555–65; < Middle French frise]

frieze2

(friz)

n.
1. a heavy, napped woolen cloth for coats.
2. a heavy fabric with uncut pile loops, made of wool, mohair, cotton, or synthetic fibers.
[1350–1400; Middle English frise < Old French; see frieze1]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.frieze - an architectural ornament consisting of a horizontal sculptured band between the architrave and the cornicefrieze - an architectural ornament consisting of a horizontal sculptured band between the architrave and the cornice
architectural ornament - (architecture) something added to a building to improve its appearance
entablature - (architecture) the structure consisting of the part of a classical temple above the columns between a capital and the roof
2.frieze - a heavy woolen fabric with a long nap
cloth, fabric, textile, material - artifact made by weaving or felting or knitting or crocheting natural or synthetic fibers; "the fabric in the curtains was light and semitransparent"; "woven cloth originated in Mesopotamia around 5000 BC"; "she measured off enough material for a dress"
Translations
إِفْريز
vlys
frise
myndræma
frizas
frīze
vlys
duvar süsüfriz

frieze

[friːz] N (Archit) → friso m; (= painting) → fresco m

frieze

[ˈfriːz] nfrise f, bordure f

frieze

1
n (Archit: = picture) → Fries m; (= thin band)Zierstreifen m

frieze

2
n (Tex) → Fries m

frieze

[friːz] n (Archit) → fregio

frieze

(friːz) noun
a narrow strip around the walls of a room, building etc near the top, usually decorated with pictures, carving etc. The walls were decorated with a frieze of horses.
References in classic literature ?
They have used a horizontal breadth for a frieze, and that adds wonderfully to the confusion.
Each put on a coarse straw bonnet, with strings of coloured calico, and a cloak of grey frieze.
At the same moment he noticed a pair of stockings, round the tops of which one of the daintiest artists in the land had wrought an exquisite little frieze.
On a slope to Gertrude's right hand, Sallust's House, with its cinnamon-colored walls and yellow frieze, gave a foreign air to the otherwise very English landscape.
It was, in its way, a very charming room, with its high panelled wainscoting of olive-stained oak, its cream-coloured frieze and ceiling of raised plasterwork, and its brickdust felt carpet strewn with silk, long-fringed Persian rugs.
The traveller, a man of middle age, wrapped in a gray frieze cloak, quickened his pace when he had reached the outskirts of the town, for a gloomy extent of nearly four miles lay between him and his home.
That Cheyne boy's the biggest nuisance aboard," said a man in a frieze overcoat, shutting the door with a bang.
But not the Parthenon, not the frieze of Phidias at any price; and here comes the victoria.
Holmes bent over this grotesque frieze for some minutes, and then suddenly sprang to his feet with an exclamation of surprise and dismay.
Soldiers were continually rushing backwards and forwards near it, and he saw two of them and a man in a frieze coat dragging burning beams into another yard across the street, while others carried bundles of hay.
A vine wanders along the whole side of the house, a pleasant strip of green like a frieze, between the two stories.
After so much self-colour and self-denial, Margaret viewed with relief the sumptuous dado, the frieze, the gilded wall-paper, amid whose foliage parrots sang.