frigate


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Related to frigate: frigate birds

frig·ate

 (frĭg′ĭt)
n.
1. A warship that is smaller than a destroyer and used primarily for escort duty.
2. A high-speed, medium-sized sailing war vessel of the 1600s, 1700s, and 1800s.
3. Obsolete A fast, light vessel, such as a sailboat.

[French frégate, from Italian fregata.]

frigate

(ˈfrɪɡɪt)
n
1. (Nautical Terms) a medium-sized square-rigged warship of the 18th and 19th centuries
2. (Nautical Terms)
a. Brit a warship larger than a corvette and smaller than a destroyer
b. US (formerly) a warship larger than a destroyer and smaller than a cruiser
c. US a small escort vessel
[C16: from French frégate, from Italian fregata, of unknown origin]

frig•ate

(ˈfrɪg ɪt)

n.
1. a fast naval vessel of the late 18th and early 19th centuries, generally having a lofty ship rig and being heavily armed on one or two decks.
2. a modern warship.
[1575–85; < Middle French frégate < Italian fregata, Sicilian fragata]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.frigate - a medium size square-rigged warship of the 18th and 19th centuriesfrigate - a medium size square-rigged warship of the 18th and 19th centuries
combat ship, war vessel, warship - a government ship that is available for waging war
2.frigate - a United States warship larger than a destroyer and smaller than a cruiser
guided missile frigate - a frigate that carries guided missiles
combat ship, war vessel, warship - a government ship that is available for waging war
Translations

frigate

[ˈfrɪgɪt] N (Naut) → fragata f

frigate

[ˈfrɪgət] n (modern)frégate f

frigate

n (Naut) → Fregatte f

frigate

[ˈfrɪgɪt] n (Naut) → fregata
References in classic literature ?
There was the story of Doffue Martling, a large blue-bearded Dutchman, who had nearly taken a British frigate with an old iron nine-pounder from a mud breastwork, only that his gun burst at the sixth discharge.
Where unrecorded names and navies rust, and untold hopes and anchors rot; where in her murderous hold this frigate earth is ballasted with bones of millions of the drowned; there, in that awful water-land, there was thy most familiar home.
On one of them was painted by some very poor hand the Rape of Helen, when the bold guest carried her off from Menelaus, and on the other was the story of Dido and AEneas, she on a high tower, as though she were making signals with a half sheet to her fugitive guest who was out at sea flying in a frigate or brigantine.
A frigate of great speed, the Abraham Lincoln, was put in commission as soon as possible.
Why, in the first place, his yacht is not a ship, but a bird, and he would beat any frigate three knots in every nine; and if he were to throw himself on the coast, why, is he not certain of finding friends everywhere?
The captain of a frigate in the harbor, and two or three civil officers under the Crown, were also there.
Soon after this," said Grandfather, "Sir William Phips quarrelled with the captain of an English frigate, and also with the collector of Boston.
Frigate Chesapeake was killed on June 1, 1813, as his ship was captured by H.
And for a good quarter of a mile, from the dockyard gate to the farthest corner, where the old housed-in hulk, the President (drill-ship, then, of the Naval Reserve), used to lie with her frigate side rubbing against the stone of the quay, above all these hulls, ready and unready, a hundred and fifty lofty masts, more or less, held out the web of their rigging like an immense net, in whose close mesh, black against the sky, the heavy yards seemed to be entangled and suspended.
He joined the crew of the American frigate United States, which reached Boston, stopping on the way at one of the Peruvian ports, in October of 1844.
The commodore having received from a high official source assurance of the deep interest which the government took in the enterprise, sent directions to Captain Hull, at that time cruising off the harbor, in the frigate Constitution, to afford the Tonquin the required protection when she should put to sea.
He had been several years at sea, and had, in the course of those removals to which all midshipmen are liable, and especially such midshipmen as every captain wishes to get rid of, been six months on board Captain Frederick Wentworth's frigate, the Laconia; and from the Laconia he had, under the influence of his captain, written the only two letters which his father and mother had ever received from him during the whole of his absence; that is to say, the only two disinterested letters; all the rest had been mere applications for money.