frigid


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frig·id

 (frĭj′ĭd)
adj.
1. Extremely cold. See Synonyms at cold.
2. Lacking warmth of feeling.
3. Stiff and formal in manner: a frigid refusal to a request.
4. Showing little or no enthusiasm: Scientists gave the new theory a frigid reception.
5. Often Offensive Lacking sexual desire or unwilling to engage in sexual activity. Used especially of women.

[Latin frīgidus, cold, from frīgus, the cold.]

fri·gid′i·ty (frĭ-jĭd′ĭ-tē), frig′id·ness n.
frig′id·ly adv.

frigid

(ˈfrɪdʒɪd)
adj
1. formal or stiff in behaviour or temperament; lacking in affection or warmth
2. (esp of a woman)
a. lacking sexual responsiveness
b. averse to sexual intercourse or unable to achieve orgasm during intercourse
3. characterized by physical coldness: a frigid zone.
[C15: from Latin frigidus cold, from frīgēre to be cold, freeze; related to Latin frīgus frost]
friˈgidity, ˈfrigidness n
ˈfrigidly adv

frig•id

(ˈfrɪdʒ ɪd)

adj.
1. very cold in temperature: a frigid climate.
2.
a. without warmth of feeling; without ardor or enthusiasm: a frigid reaction to the proposed law.
b. stiff or formal: a polite but frigid welcome.
3. (of a woman)
a. unable to experience an orgasm or sexual excitement during sexual intercourse.
b. unresponsive to sexual advances or stimuli.
[1590–1600; < Latin frīgidus]
fri•gid′i•ty, n.
frig′id•ness, n.
frig′id•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.frigid - sexually unresponsive; "was cold to his advances"; "a frigid woman"
unloving - not giving or reciprocating affection
2.frigid - extremely cold; "an arctic climate"; "a frigid day"; "gelid waters of the North Atlantic"; "glacial winds"; "icy hands"; "polar weather"
cold - having a low or inadequate temperature or feeling a sensation of coldness or having been made cold by e.g. ice or refrigeration; "a cold climate"; "a cold room"; "dinner has gotten cold"; "cold fingers"; "if you are cold, turn up the heat"; "a cold beer"
3.frigid - devoid of warmth and cordiality; expressive of unfriendliness or disdain; "a frigid greeting"; "got a frosty reception"; "a frozen look on their faces"; "a glacial handshake"; "icy stare"; "wintry smile"
cold - extended meanings; especially of psychological coldness; without human warmth or emotion; "a cold unfriendly nod"; "a cold and unaffectionate person"; "a cold impersonal manner"; "cold logic"; "the concert left me cold"

frigid

adjective
1. freezing, cold, frozen, icy, chill, arctic, Siberian, frosty, cool, glacial, wintry, gelid, frost-bound, hyperboreal The water was too frigid to allow him to remain submerged.
freezing hot, warm, stifling, sweltering
2. sexually unresponsive, cold, distant, unfeeling, passionless, undemonstrative My husband says I am frigid.

frigid

adjective
1. Very cold:
Archaic: frore.
Idiom: bitter cold.
2. Lacking all friendliness and warmth:
3. Deficient in or lacking sexual desire:
Translations
بارد الشُّعورمُتَجَمِّد
chladnýledový
bidende koldkøliguvenlig
kuldalegurmjög kaldur
frigidiškumasļšalo
aukstsbezkaislīgsdzedrsledainspolārs
frigidný

frigid

[ˈfrɪdʒɪd] ADJ
1. (sexually) → frígido
2. (= unfriendly) [atmosphere, look etc] → frío, glacial

frigid

[ˈfrɪdʒɪd] adj [woman] → frigide

frigid

adj
(sexually) → frigide
(form: = cold) place, air, night, weathereiskalt; temperature, silence, stareeisig; atmosphere, manner, smilefrostig

frigid

[ˈfrɪdʒɪd] adj (atmosphere, look) → glaciale (Psych) → frigido/a

frigid

(ˈfridʒid) adjective
1. cold and unemotional. He behaves in a frigid manner.
2. frozen. the frigid zones of the world (= the Arctic and Antarctic).
ˈfrigidly adverb
friˈgidity noun

frig·id

a. frígido-a.

frigid

adj (ant) con deseo sexual disminuido (dicho de una mujer), frígida (ant)
References in classic literature ?
But an unlucky allusion to his previous remarks on Kearney's attentions to Jessie, and a querulous regret that he had permitted a disruption of their social intimacy, brought such an ominous and frigid opposition, not only from Christie, but even the frivolous Jessie herself, that Carr sank back in a crushed and terrified silence.
This savage was the only person present who seemed to notice my entrance; because he was the only one who could not read, and, therefore, was not reading those frigid inscriptions on the wall.
I impute it, though, to their naturally unctuous natures, being rendered still more unctuous by the nature of their vocation, and especially by their pursuing their game in those frigid Polar Seas, on the very coasts of that Esquimaux country where the convivial natives pledge each other in bumpers of train oil.
Often, as she read, her voice faltered, and sometimes failed her altogether, when she would stop, with an air of frigid composure, till she had mastered herself.
I saw her in a black gown and widow's cap; frigid, perhaps, but not uncivil: a model of elderly English respectability.
That my papa was too partial, I know; still, on such a point as the frigid coldness which has ever subsisted between Mr.
He was at home again, incognito and rich; presently he could enter his father's house by means of the pass-key, which he had piously preserved through all his wanderings; he would throw down the borrowed money; there would be a reconciliation, the details of which he frequently arranged; and he saw himself, during the next month, made welcome in many stately houses at many frigid dinner-parties, taking his share in the conversation with the freedom of the man and the traveller, and laying down the law upon finance with the authority of the successful investor.
By no means," replied the count in the most frigid tones; "Ali has many faults mixed with most excellent qualities.
At breakfast time, eating nothing myself, I presided with such frigid dignity that the two mates were only too glad to escape from the cabin as soon as decency permitted; and all the time the dual working of my mind distracted me al- most to the point of insanity.
Your Byron would have worshipped her, and you--you cold, frigid islander
His manner at these moments was frigid and abstract; his eyes were vacant in expression; while his voice, usually a rich tenor, rose into a treble which would have sounded petulantly but for the deliberateness and entire distinctness of the enunciation.
Frigid and yet friendly, frank yet cautious, shrewd yet credulous, positive yet skeptical, confident yet shy, extremely intelligent and extremely good-humored, there was something vaguely defiant in its concessions, and something profoundly reassuring in its reserve.