frisson


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fris·son

 (frē-sōN′)
n. pl. fris·sons (-sōNz′, -sōN′)
A moment of intense excitement; a shudder: The story's ending arouses a frisson of terror.

[French, from Old French fricons, pl. of fricon, a trembling, from Vulgar Latin *frīctiō, *frīctiōn-, from Latin frīgēre, to be cold.]

frisson

(frisɔ̃)
n
a shudder or shiver; thrill
[C18 (but in common use only from C20): literally: shiver]

fris•son

(friˈsõʊ̃)

n.
a passing sensation of excitement; thrill.
[1770–80; < French: shiver, shudder, Old French friçons (pl.) < Late Latin frictiōnem, acc. of frictiō shiver (taken as derivative of frīgēre to be cold), Latin: massage, friction]

frisson

A French word meaning a shiver, used to mean a thrill or sensation of excitement or fear.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.frisson - an almost pleasurable sensation of frightfrisson - an almost pleasurable sensation of fright; "a frisson of surprise shot through him"
fear, fearfulness, fright - an emotion experienced in anticipation of some specific pain or danger (usually accompanied by a desire to flee or fight)
Translations

frisson

[ˈfriːsɒn] N [of horror, fear] → repelús m; [of excitement] → escalofrío m

frisson

[ˈfriːsɒn frisɔ̃] (literary) nfrisson m

frisson

n (= thrill)Schauer m
References in periodicals archive ?
This automatic/associative frisson constituted the whole content of the films, which accordingly got pretty tedious.
But the alligator adds a genuine frisson, and the package looks like giving Prendiville another popular hit.
An up-tempo first movement revealed flickering colour, playfulness and even lushness, subtle climaxes yielded just the right frisson and the finale's tension was brilliantly managed.
I can only imagine the frisson at the Beverly Hills opening.
The combination of mandolin with McLaughlin's electric guitar added a frisson of tension and, dare I say it, generational competition, each player exchanging ever-faster licks in an orgy of sliding notes.
The scenes between Hershey and Campbell suffer from a curious lack of frisson.
Sophie Calle is a storyteller who insinuates herself into the lives of her (at times unwilling, at times unwitting) subjects; the frisson derives from her intense engagement.
This frisson disappears in the oil paintings, which are larger and less luminous and thus not so ineffably risque.
The inclusion of O Salutaris Hostia and O Sapientiae by the modern Swedish composer Jennefelt, though seemingly out of context, added a frisson of daring and a touch of spice to an impressive concert performance.
Romantic frisson is provided by Dice (Max Beesley), a presumably hip club DJ who thrusts Billie on her road to stardom.
The mismatched couple, whose edgy intellectual relationship was what gave ``Lambs'' the special frisson that lifted it light-years above the average serial-killer thriller, weren't even in the same hemisphere together until past the novel's halfway point.
While there is some crucial investigation of the brief going on here--some frisson in the adjacency of these projects now--it is dampened by the homogeneity with which each project is presented, the examlike rigor with which the format is enforced.