fritz


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fritz

 (frĭts)
n. Informal
A condition in which something does not work properly: Our television is on the fritz.

[Perhaps from German Fritz, diminutive of the name Friedrich.]

fritz

(frɪts)
n
on the fritz (of an appliance, etc) broken or malfunctioning
vb (intr)
(of an appliance, etc) to become broken or start malfunctioning

fritz

(frɪts)

n. Idiom.
on the fritz, Informal. not in working order: Our TV went on the fritz last night.
[1900–05, Amer.; of obscure orig.]
References in classic literature ?
The younger men quiz him, it seems, call him Old Fritz, Lager Beer, Ursa Major, and make all manner of jokes on his name.
Quite indifferent students of German can read Fritz Reuter's charming platt-Deutch tales with some little facility because many of the words are English.
Monsieur Le Quoi has come out with only one cap; Old Fritz would not stay to finish the bottle; and Mr.
And Fritz, my old friend, this is a kind compliment, indeed, for seventy to pay to five-and-forty.
I still retain an almost verbatim report of the interview in which he demonstrated the true facts of the case to Monsieur Dubugue of the Paris police, and Fritz von Waldbaum, the well-known specialist of Dantzig, both of whom had wasted their energies upon what proved to be side-issues.
As for my affections, battered and exhausted as they ought to have been in many literary passions, they never went out with fresher enjoyment than they did to the charming story of 'L'Ami Fritz,' which, when I merely name it, breathes the spring sun and air about me, and fills my senses with the beauty and sweetness of cherry blossoms.
Hauptmann Fritz Schneider trudged wearily through the somber aisles of the dark forest.
It was enough for Hauptmann Fritz Schneider to know that he was lost in the African wilderness and that he had at hand human beings less powerful than he who could be made to suffer by torture.
It will go well indeed with Herr Hauptmann Fritz Schneider if he brings in the famous Tarzan of the Apes as a prisoner of war.
As the sun sank slowly behind the towering forests of the west, he turned slowly away upon the still-distinct trail of Hauptmann Fritz Schneider and his blood-stained company.
Max and Fritz were at the door, listening with wonder to Mrs.
So Becky bowed Jos out of her little garret with as much grace as if it was a palace of which she did the honours; and that heavy gentleman having disappeared down the stairs, Max and Fritz came out of their hole, pipe in mouth, and she amused herself by mimicking Jos to them as she munched her cold bread and sausage and took draughts of her favourite brandy-and-water.