frivolity

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Related to frivolities: concluded, adhered, surpassed

fri·vol·i·ty

 (frĭ-vŏl′ĭ-tē)
n. pl. fri·vol·i·ties
1. The quality or condition of being frivolous.
2. A frivolous act or thing.

fri•vol•i•ty

(frɪˈvɒl ɪ ti)

n., pl. -ties.
1. the quality or state of being frivolous.
2. a frivolous act or thing.
[1790–1800; < French]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.frivolity - the trait of being frivolous; not serious or sensible
trait - a distinguishing feature of your personal nature
giddiness, silliness - an impulsive scatterbrained manner
levity - a manner lacking seriousness
playfulness, fun - a disposition to find (or make) causes for amusement; "her playfulness surprised me"; "he was fun to be with"
serious-mindedness, earnestness, seriousness, sincerity - the trait of being serious; "a lack of solemnity is not necessarily a lack of seriousness"- Robert Rice
2.frivolity - something of little value or significance
small beer, trivia, triviality, trifle - something of small importance
3.frivolity - acting like a clown or buffoonfrivolity - acting like a clown or buffoon  
foolery, tomfoolery, lunacy, craziness, folly, indulgence - foolish or senseless behavior
schtick, schtik, shtick, shtik - (Yiddish) a prank or piece of clowning; "his shtik made us laugh"

frivolity

frivolity

noun
Something or things that are unimportant:
Translations
طَيْش، عدم جَدِّيَّه، اسْتِهْتارعَبَث، تُرَّهَه، تَوافِه
pošetilostpovrchnost
pjankpjankethed
hégómi, einskisverîur hluturléttúî, alvöruleysi
pochabosť
avarelikgönül eğlendirmehavailikhoppalık

frivolity

[frɪˈvɒlɪtɪ] N (gen) → frivolidad f

frivolity

[frɪˈvɒlɪti] nfrivolité f

frivolity

nFrivolität f; (of appearance, writer)unseriöse Art

frivolity

[frɪˈvɒlɪtɪ] nfrivolezza

frivolous

(ˈfrivələs) adjective
not serious; playful. He wasted his time on frivolous pleasures.
ˈfrivolously adverb
ˈfrivolousness noun
friˈvolity (-ˈvo-) nounplural friˈvolities
1. frivolousness. The frivolity of his behaviour.
2. a frivolous action or thought. I have no time for frivolities.
References in classic literature ?
All those frivolities of summer, the light and shadow, the living mask of green that trembled over everything, they were lies, and this is what was underneath.
Those who live on the frivolities of mankind, or, what is the same thing, their luxuries, have two sets of victims to plunder--the consumer, and the real producer, or the operative.
In that case, monsieur will be able to aid me in finding out what was mademoiselle's reason for making me sit before her sofa one mortal hour, listening to the most copious and fluent dissertation on the merest frivolities.
But this superadded consciousness, wearying and annoying enough when it urged on me the trivial experience of indifferent people, became an intense pain and grief when it seemed to be opening to me the souls of those who were in a close relation to me--when the rational talk, the graceful attentions, the wittily-turned phrases, and the kindly deeds, which used to make the web of their characters, were seen as if thrust asunder by a microscopic vision, that showed all the intermediate frivolities, all the suppressed egoism, all the struggling chaos of puerilities, meanness, vague capricious memories, and indolent make-shift thoughts, from which human words and deeds emerge like leaflets covering a fermenting heap.
He wondered a little that she did not enter into these frivolities with his own zest.
The first Saturday night of any other pleasure excursion might have been devoted to whist and dancing; but I submit it to the unprejudiced mind if it would have been in good taste for us to engage in such frivolities, considering what we had gone through and the frame of mind we were in.
Mr Nickleby glanced at these frivolities with great contempt, and gave a double knock, which, having been thrice repeated, was answered by a servant girl with an uncommonly dirty face.
Her time was past, she said, for such frivolities, and she offered the instrument for the breakfast cap of which Saxon had made so good a success.
It is no imputation upon him to say he has not, because young men who have plunged deeply into the frivolities and conventionalities of society, very seldom have.