frivolous


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friv·o·lous

 (frĭv′ə-ləs)
adj.
1. Unworthy of serious attention; trivial: a frivolous novel.
2. Inappropriately silly: a frivolous purchase.

[Middle English, probably from Latin frīvolus, of little value, probably from friāre, to crumble.]

friv′o·lous·ly adv.
friv′o·lous·ness n.

frivolous

(ˈfrɪvələs)
adj
1. not serious or sensible in content, attitude, or behaviour; silly: a frivolous remark.
2. unworthy of serious or sensible treatment; unimportant: frivolous details.
[C15: from Latin frīvolus silly, worthless]
ˈfrivolously adv
ˈfrivolousness, frivolity n

friv•o•lous

(ˈfrɪv ə ləs)

adj.
1. characterized by lack of seriousness or sense: frivolous conduct.
2. (of a person) given to trifling or undue levity.
3. of little or no weight, worth, or importance; not worthy of serious notice: a frivolous suggestion.
[1425–75; late Middle English < Latin frīvolus worthless, trifling]
friv′o•lous•ly, adv.
friv′o•lous•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.frivolous - not serious in content or attitude or behavior; "a frivolous novel"; "a frivolous remark"; "a frivolous young woman"
superficial - concerned with or comprehending only what is apparent or obvious; not deep or penetrating emotionally or intellectually; "superficial similarities"; "a superficial mind"; "his thinking was superficial and fuzzy"; "superficial knowledge"; "the superficial report didn't give the true picture"; "only superficial differences"
serious - concerned with work or important matters rather than play or trivialities; "a serious student of history"; "a serious attempt to learn to ski"; "gave me a serious look"; "a serious young man"; "are you serious or joking?"; "Don't be so serious!"

frivolous

adjective
1. flippant, foolish, dizzy, superficial, silly, flip (informal), juvenile, idle, childish, giddy, puerile, flighty, ill-considered, empty-headed, light-hearted, nonserious, light-minded, ditzy or ditsy (slang) I was a bit too frivolous to be a doctor.
flippant serious, earnest, responsible, practical, mature, sensible, solemn
2. trivial, petty, trifling, unimportant, light, minor, shallow, pointless, extravagant, peripheral, niggling, paltry, impractical, nickel-and-dime (U.S. slang), footling (informal) wasting money on frivolous projects
trivial important, serious, vital

frivolous

adjective
Translations
غَيْر جَدّي، طائِش
lehkovážnýpovrchní
overfladisk
léttúîugur, alvörulaus
tuštybė
fri-volsvieglprātīgs

frivolous

[ˈfrɪvələs] ADJfrívolo

frivolous

[ˈfrɪvələs] adjfrivole

frivolous

adj person, attitude, remarkfrivol, leichtfertig; clothes, appearance, writer, scientistunseriös; object, activityalbern; I spend a lot of money on frivolous thingsich gebe viel Geld für unwichtige Dinge aus; the frivolous stories of the tabloidsdie belanglosen Berichte in den Boulevardzeitungen

frivolous

[ˈfrɪvələs] adjfrivolo/a

frivolous

(ˈfrivələs) adjective
not serious; playful. He wasted his time on frivolous pleasures.
ˈfrivolously adverb
ˈfrivolousness noun
friˈvolity (-ˈvo-) nounplural friˈvolities
1. frivolousness. The frivolity of his behaviour.
2. a frivolous action or thought. I have no time for frivolities.

frivolous

a. frívolo-a; tonto-a; vano-a.
References in classic literature ?
Aunt woke up and, being more good-natured after her nap, told me to read a bit and show what frivolous work I preferred to the worthy and instructive Belsham.
But an unlucky allusion to his previous remarks on Kearney's attentions to Jessie, and a querulous regret that he had permitted a disruption of their social intimacy, brought such an ominous and frigid opposition, not only from Christie, but even the frivolous Jessie herself, that Carr sank back in a crushed and terrified silence.
And then Schliemann went on to outline some of the wastes of competition: the losses of industrial warfare; the ceaseless worry and friction; the vices--such as drink, for instance, the use of which had nearly doubled in twenty years, as a consequence of the intensification of the economic struggle; the idle and unproductive members of the community, the frivolous rich and the pauperized poor; the law and the whole machinery of repression; the wastes of social ostentation, the milliners and tailors, the hairdressers, dancing masters, chefs and lackeys.
I was a champion, it was true, but not the champion of the frivolous black arts, I was the champion of hard unsentimental common-sense and reason.
If he could act so, and be so heedless and so frivolous at such a time, and actually seem to glory in it, after all I had done for him, I would have cut my hand off before I would let him see that I was wounded.
He dropped gradually back into his old frivolous and easygoing ways and conditions of feeling and manner of speech, and no familiar of his could have detected anything in him that differentiated him from the weak and careless Tom of other days.
There is no school in all our land where the young ladies do not feel obliged to close their compositions with a sermon; and you will find that the sermon of the most frivolous and the least religious girl in the school is always the longest and the most relentlessly pious.
The youthful infatuation of nineteen would naturally blind him to every thing but her beauty and good nature; but the four succeeding years--years, which if rationally spent, give such improvement to the understanding, must have opened his eyes to her defects of education, while the same period of time, spent on her side in inferior society and more frivolous pursuits, had perhaps robbed her of that simplicity which might once have given an interesting character to her beauty.
I hardly know where I found the hardihood thus to open a conversation with a stranger; the step was contrary to my nature and habits: but I think her occupation touched a chord of sympathy somewhere; for I too liked reading, though of a frivolous and childish kind; I could not digest or comprehend the serious or substantial.
They DO live more in earnest, more in themselves, and less in surface, change, and frivolous external things.
Yet, for all that, one could not be insensible to the exotic race and distinction of that frivolous town petticoat, daintily disporting itself there among its country cousins, like a queen among milkmaids.
Jefferson Smilash (a step upon which she resolved the day after the storm), her imagination invested the pleasing emotion with a sacredness which, to her, set it far apart and distinct from the frivolous fancies of which Henry and Augustus had been the subject, and she the confidant.